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SPECIAL COMMUNICATION.

It will be seen that the Institute must no longer be consilcred as a London Society supported only by Members resident in the Metropolis ; recent experience amply proves that its organization can be made useful to NIembers living even far beyond the limits of the United Kingilom, and that in not a few instances these, by contributions to the Joional, by making the Institute known, d'c., greatly enhance the value of its proceedings.

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HE following Members and Associates joined during 1878 :--30

foreign and colonial, 57 country, 14 resident in London. Those adverse influences, which have affected every interest and Society, have prevented this addition raising the total strength of the Institute above 750.

New arrangements have been carried into effect, securing the greater usefulness of the “ Journal of Transactions

to country and foreign members, and affording them facilities for expressing their opinions on the papers brought before the Institute prior

to the appearance in the Journal. From the above figures it will be seen that the Institute is now making the initiatory efforts to extend itself to Amerie: and all the Colonies (see 1878 Report, paras. 2 and 16 ; also Prefice vol. XII.).

The success that has already attended these initiutory efforts, and the correspondence received, has proved the importance of the object sought, and which can now be carried out if the Society continues to be maintained in it thorough state of efficiency; this, however, depends on the STEADY SUPPORT OF ALL, and their cooperation in raising the strength of the Institute by introducing new members and associates.

The published list of distinguished men (among whom are four American and other authors) who have prepared papers this year shows that the Institute maintains its position.

FINANCE.-- The early payment of the 1878 subscriptions was a valuable item towards the success of the year's work. The expenses did not exceed the receipts. Salaries were 57. The audit, by two specially qualified unofficial members, was as thorough as usual. The Institute's ordinary work was supplemented by the following

ADDITIONAL WORK. LECTURES.--In many places, it home and abron, the įrapers in the jonrnal continue to be used both by members and non-members, as the basis of lectures, and several letters have been received commending them as "being just what was needed," &e.; one most active and popular lecturing member writes “ Without then I should be unable to give my lectures." The works in the Library are also utilized by members giving public lectures, and every effort is male that the Organization of the Institute shall be made is useful as possible to such ; one of whom recently writes: “ Had it not been for the publications of the Institute I should never have read a paper on such it subject.” (The audience, among whom were 300 clergymen, requested the publicativni of this lecture.)

TAE PEOPLE's Edition is much used by lecturers, and its popularity is very encouraging. The Sp.cial Fund has to a considerable extent enabled the Society to carry out the second proposal in the last Report, in communicating in regard to the Society's work with leading men in the United States, and in every British possession throughout the world.* It has also enalled them to reply to the communications from the Australian colonies pressing the great necessity for a brief effective reply to Matthew Arnold's last work, which had become very popular in those colonies. Professor Lias' “Reply”—which was so arranged as to supply the want and bring the Society's objects before its readers - Was sent to almost every minister and several of the laity throughout the whole of the Australian colonies (including New Zcalanı). A special request from India, where it was urged that Straus' works were fait becoming very popular, was met by a People's Edition of the Rer. Preb. Row's “Reply" being similarly got up, and almost as extensively circulated throughout the three Presidencies.-The Institute has songht to make all these communications as effective as possible.

The republication in America of some of the Institute's Papers continues, and cannot be without il good effect.

THE BOOKSELLER AGENTS continue to sell the People's Editions, especially to members of artisans' clubs, and others.

THE NEWSPAPER PRESS generally has been commuuicated with, and the Institute and its objects are indebted to it, both in England, in many of the colonies, and especially in the United States.

It will interest many to know that one of the Society's members resident in the southern hemisphere, is now founding a fellowship and two scholarships (of £200 a year in all) in one of our home universities, for the purpose of promoting the same object which the Institute was founded to carry out. It is not often that the value of a society's main object is so emphatically recognized.

The increasing favour with which the Institute is regarded is evidenced in various ways, and its good relations with scientific men and leading scientific societies continue.

F. PETRIE, Hon. Sar. VICTORIA IXSTITUTE, Or, Philosophical Society of Great Britain,

7, Adelphi Terrace, London, II.C.

* Bishop Cotterill's paper (specially arranged so as to bring the Institute's ohjects before its readers) was used in doing this. In revaril to this paper (vol. XII., p. 312), which has attracted much ittention, Canon Cook, the editor of the Speaker's Commentary, sars,

* It deals with the deepest questions in a way that will carry conviction into the minds of candid and perplexed inquirers, and shake deeply-rooted prejudices which bave lony obscured intellects of liigh order." Thie author's correspondence in regard to this paper "shows that it has reached readers in every part of the worll,"

BINDING.

MEMBERS are entitled to have the parts of

Vol. XII. bound free of cost, and the Covers gratis.

ASSOCIATES can have the Parts of Vol. XII. bound for 2s. 2d., or the Covers for 1s.

The Parts of previous Volumes can be bound for Members for 1s. each ; for Associates, for 2s. 2d.

Covers for previous Volumes may be had by Members or Associates at 1s. each.

MEMBERS AND ASSOCIATES hauing, all of the N'olumes of Series II. (Wols. 7 to 12) can complete that series at 108 bd. per kound

volume.

VICTORIA INSTITUTE,

7, ADELPHI TERRACE.

JOURNAL OF

THE TRANSACTIONS

OF

THE VICTORIA INSTITUTE,

OR

Philosophical Society of Great Britain. .

EDITED BY THE HONORARY SECRETARY,

,

CAPTAIN F. W. H. PETRIE, F.R.S.L., F.G.S., &c.

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(Published for the Institute)
HARDWICKE & BOGUE, 192, PICCADILLY, W.

STANFORD, CHARING CROSS.
EDINBURGH, J. THIN. DUBLIN, G. HERBERT.

PARIS, GALIGNANI & CO.

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CONTENTS-N0. XLIX.

JOURNAL OF TRANSACTIONS.

Page

1

MEETING, APRIL 1, 1878 ...

MODERN GEOGENIES EXAMINED IN THEIR BEARING ON THE ANTIQUITY

OF MAN. BY THE REV. PROFESSOR BIRKS, M.A....

2

DISCUSSION ON THE ABOVE

28

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, MAY 31, 1878 ...

40

THE ANNUAL ADDRESS. BY THE REV. PRINCIPAL RIGG, D.D.

50

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