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RICHARD CLAY AND SONS, LIMITED) BRUNSWICK ST., STAMFORD ST., S. E.,

AND BUNGAY, SUFFOLK.

CONTENTS

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AUTHOR

PAGE
AFLALO, F. G..
Diana of the Highways

355
BAERLEIN, Henry
In a Field .

188

Italy's Policy and her Position in Europe . 11

BARKER, J. Ellis

Anglo-German Differences and Sir Edward

Grey

447

BATTINE, Captain Cecil . . Ş Russian Ascendancy in Europe and Asia 437

How to Postpone an Anglo-German War . 1049

BAUMANN, A. A.

s Is a Tory Revival Possible? .

217

The Tory Party and State Socialism

801
Binyon, Laurence .
Thunder on the Downs

1112

BLATHWAYT, Raymond

England's Taste in Literature.

160

England, Germany, and Common Sense . 147

Aspects of the Religious Question in

BROOKS, Sydney

Ireland

380

Mr. Roosevelt's Reappearance

730
Sir Horace Plunkett and his Work

1011
BURKE, H. Lardner

Trial by Jury in our African Colonies 67
CALLICOT, T. C.
The Philosophy of Clothes

520

CAMPBELL, Spencer

The Peril Afloat .

747

CHILDERS, Erskine

JThe Home Rule Bill

866

COURTNEY, W. L. .

Sappho and Aspasia

479

CROZIER, Dr. J. Beattie The Government of India Problem

91.
DAVIDSON, Ethel Goddard The Passing of Findabair

758
ELLIS, S. M.
George Meredith and his Relatives

625
Escort, T. H. S.
Literature and Journalism

115
GALSWORTHY, John
Vague Thoughts on Art

279

GARDINER, A. G.

The Prospects of the Government

496

(The

Russian Consul-General and the

GELBERG, S.

Russian Jews

543

GEBOTHWOHL, Prof. Maurice. {The English and French Attitudes towards

| Poetry

940

GORDON, Sir Home, Bart. . The Real Meaning of this Cricket Season . 1143

928

GRIBBLE, Francis

| Talma and Pauline Bonaparte .

| The Secret of Marceline Desbordes-Valmore 1070

GRITTEN, W. G. Howard Revolution or the Unionist Party ?

895

HAMILTON, Angus .

The Mishmi Mission

553

(God's Funeral . .

397

HARDY, Thomas, O.M.

The Convergence of the Twain

981

HEWLETT, Maurice

Lai of Gobertz

848

HEYKING, Baron

Anglo-Russian Progress

107

The Deathknell of the National Service
Scheme

52 -

HURD, Archibald

The New Naval Crisis and the Oversea

Dominions

613

The German Menace to our Sea Supremacy 785–

INGRAM, T. A. .

The National Insurance Act.

40

JARINTZOFF, Mme.
The Past of the Russian Cossacks

172
JERROLD, Laurence

French “Patriots” and English “Liberals” 226
LAWTON, Frederick
Albert Besnard

1059
LILLY, W. S.
Substitutes for Christianity

716

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AUTHOR

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PAGE

131
The Reichstag Election
LONG, R. C. ..
The New Reichstag and the Old Policy

641

The Foreign Office Autocracy

1

Low, Sidney

The Most Christian Powers .

414

Anti-Strike Legislation in Australasia 585

MACDONALD, John F.

The Life Story of Madame Steinheil 958

MACHRAY, Robert

The Fate of Persia .

291

Maud, Constance E.

Abdul Baha

707

MELVILLE, Lewis

William Cobbett

675

MINCHIN, H. C.

Browning and Wordsworth

813

NEVINSON, H. W.

Qualis Artifex ! ”

1150

Noyes, Alfred

For the Centenary of Robert Browning . 811

OYLER, Philip

Colour Meanings of some British Birds

and Quadrupeds

368

PAULL, H. M.

John Gay

1095

POLLOCK, John .

The Censorship

880

POUND, Ezra

Canzone : Of Angels

277

REES, Sir J. D., K.C.I.E. The Coronation Concessions in India

303

Ross, Patrick' H. W.

The Whirligig of Men .

323

ROWLANDS, E. Bowen

Our State Prison System

835

SAMUEL, H. B..

August Strindberg

1117

SEIPPEL, Paul

M.- Roman Rolland's “Jean Christophe 661

Prince Proletariat

264

SICHEL, Walter .

1 The Strike and the Stricken.

825

| The Sikhs' Struggle against Strangulation . 82

SINGH, Saint Nihal

The Net Result of the King's Indian Tour. 529

SMITH, F. E., M.P.

Recent Developments of Education Policy

400

SPERO, David

The Future of the English Rabbinate 316

| Advantages and Defects of the Copyright

THRING, G. Herbert .

Act,, 1911

1132

THURSTON, E. Temple

The Antagonists

566, 769, 968, 1160
TWEEDIE, Mrs. Alec .
Eugenics

854

WARWICK, The Countess of The Great State and the Countryside 427

The Internal Situation in Turkey and the

WOODS, H. Charles

Effect of the War upon it.

334

912

The Insurance Bill in the Commons. Auditor Tantum .

28
A Leader, II. Variag

191
The Turn of the Tide. Curio

205
Strikes. G.

235
The Naval and Economical Triumph of the Dreadnought Policy, 1905–12.
Excubitor

248

Said Pasha, H,

347

American Problems. An American Exile

463
The Unionist Programme. Curio

599
The Leader of the Opposition. Auditor Tantum

634
Repeal or Home Rule? An Outsider

688

Lord Kitchener in Egypt

507

Isolation or Entanglement? Democritus

983
Baron Marschall and Anglo-German Differences. Politicus

995
Why Ulster Distrusts Roman Catholicism

1022
Shorter Speeches in Parliament. Auditor Tantum

1037
The New Spirit in Belgium. Y.

1084

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SOME of us have been pointing out for some years past that the control of Parliament and the electorate over the acts of the Executive Government has been steadily weakening during the past few decades. The proposition, indeed, has become one of the commonplaces of politics; and it is hardly necessary to labour the point that in this age of what is supposed to be democracy the nation is rather less the master in its own house than it was in the periods of aristocratic and oligarchic rule. Our most vital transactions are nianaged for ús benind closed doors by that secret committee called the Cabinet, which is supposed to be, but in a great many essential matters is not, responsible to the nation through the House of Commons.

Of how little effective value this theoretic Ministerial responsibility to Parliament may be we have examples daily. Take perhaps the most striking case of all—that of the transfer of the capital of India from Calcutta to Delhi, and the re-partition of Bengal. No more impressive change in the administrative system of one-fifth of the population of the world can be conceived; no act has ever been done in the whole course of the English domination of Southern Asia which may have more momentous results. If the people of the United Kingdom were really responsible for the destinies of the three hundred millions of Asiatics who owe allegiance to the Imperial Crown, it might be imagined that a transaction of such grave import and far-reaching consequences would have been taken only after deliberate and minute consideration by the representatives of the electorate. But, as a matter of fact, Parliament and the electorate have had no more to do with the matter than the German Reichstag or the Russian Duma. This mighty stroke of policy is only communicated to the House of Commons when it has become a fait accompli, and is, in fact, irrevocable; for everybody knows that after the fiat has gone forth from the mouth of the

VOL. XCI. N.S.

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King-Emperor himself at the Imperial Durbar, it cannot be traversed or set aside. The thing is done for good or evil. I am not here considering whether the evil or the good predominates in this epoch-marking innovation; but it is obvious that the ex post facto debates at Westminster can have no more effect than if they were to be held at the Oxford or Cambridge Union. It was an act of autocracy as unlimited as if it had proceeded from the Dragon Throne of China ten years ago, or from the Yildiz Kiosk before the establishment of the Turkish Constitution.

And the autocrats were a little group of statesmen and Ministers settling the whole matter in secret conclave and by the exchange of secret dispatches. It had all been arranged between Lord Hardinge and Lord Crewe, with the concurrence, one may suppose, of Mr. Asquith and Lord Morley. Whether even the Cabinet as a whole approved of the policy or was consulted about it we do not krow, for in these days there is an inner council within the Cabinet itself; and not all the twenty Ministers have any real.cognisance .of the acts. for which they are in theory collectively responsible: The: Ministerial responsibility is here even more shadowy than usual. It is true papers have been presented to Parliament, and in due course it will be open to the Opposition to criticise them ; but as the edict has been sent forth to India through the lips of the King himself it would not be possible to reverse it without inflicting a blow upon the prestige and authority of the Crown, which could not be contemplated. We may be told that the Ministers who advised the Crown to take this action may be censured or punished if their policy does not meet with the approval of the House of Commons. That, as things stand, is quite meaningless; or if the proposition has any practical significance, it would imply that at the worst Lord Crewe might be driven from office by a vote of censure, which would, however, be resisted by the whole strength of the Ministerial party and its majority. In any case, since the Declaration of Delhi must be carried out, there would be little satisfaction in terminating the political career of an amiable nobleman, of whose personality the great majority of the electors have only the vaguest consciousness.

But to turn more particularly to the management of foreign affairs. Here the Executive autocracy has been steadily growing, and the control of Parliament and the nation has diminished in an equal ratio. Ninety years ago Canning wrote a dispatch to Sir Henry Wellesley, the British Ambassador at Vienna, in which he pointed out that the shaping of English foreign policy

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