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roguish Miss Molly said, with a laugh, as she stamped it, and wrote the postmark plain as plain could be.

And so he did. For, not quite a week later, a letter came in the mail to Polly—a great, white letter, with a picture in one corner, that made Polly's father open his eyes.

"Why, it's the State's arms," said he. "What under the sun - "

But I think he suspected. Oh! how red Polly's cheeks were, and how her small fingers trembled when she tore open her letter. It was printed so that she could read it herself, all but the long words:

"DEAR MISS POLLY:-Your letter received. I am very sorry you were so ill as not to be able to eat any Thanksgiving dinner. It was quite too bad. I hereby appoint a special Thanksgiving Day for you next Thursday, December 9th,- which I trust may be kept with due form. Your friend and well-wisher, ANDREW COLBURN."

"Oh! oh! oh!" cried Polly, hopping on one foot; "will you, mother? O mother! will you? I wrote to him myself. Oh! I'm so glad."

"Did you ever! "cried Polly's mother. "Why, Polly Pinkham !” But Polly's father slapped his knee, and laughed.

"Good for Governor Colburn! I'll vote for him as long as he wants a vote. And Polly shall have a special Thanksgiving worth telling of, so she shall." So she did have the very best she ever remembered.

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Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet,

Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat;

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THANKSGIVING VERSE.

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HANKS be to God! to whom earth owes
Sunshine and breeze,

The heath-clad hill, the vale's repose,
Streamlet and seas,

The snowdrop and the summer rose,
The many-voiced trees.

Thanks for the darkness that reveals

Night's starry dower;

And for the sable cloud that heals
Each fevered flower;

And for the rushing storm that peals
Our weakness and Thy power.

Thanks for the sweetly-lingering might
In music's tone;

For paths of knowledge, whose calm light
Is all thine own;

For thoughts that at the Infinite
Fold their bright wings alone.

Once more the liberal year laughs out
O'er richer stores than gems or gold;
Once more with harvest song and shout
Is nature's bloodless triumph told.
Our common mother rests and sings
Like Ruth, among her garnered sheaves;
Her lap is full of goodly things,

Her brow is bright with autumn leaves.

O favors every year made new!

O gifts with rain and sunshine sent! The bounty overruns our due,

The fullness shames our discontent.

We shut our eyes, the flowers bloom on;

We murmur, but the corn ears fill;

We choose the shadow, but the sun

That casts it shines behind us still.- Whittier.

Praise to God, immortal praise,

For the love that crowns our days;
Bounteous source of every joy,

Let thy praise our tongues employ;

All to thee, our God, we owe

Source whence all our blessings flow.

Ah! on Thanksgiving Day, when from East and from

West,

From North and from South come the pilgrim and guest, When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board

The old broken links of affection restored,

When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more, But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled benor Birth,

When two strong men stand face to face, tho' they come from the ends of the earth!-Rudyard Kipling.

fore,

What moistens the lips and what brightens the eyeWhat calls back the past, like the rich pumpkin-pie?

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The well-trained soldier is he who listens to the word of command and intelligently executes it. Neither does the public ask you as individual teachers to decide on the course of instruction for your several school rooms. It provides the channels through which this information must come. Your work is to intelligently follow the word of command and to train your pupils to do the same in the positions they may fill in life. So many parents allow their children to govern themselves that many-in fact, the most of the childrenmust learn after they go out into the world that they cannot command if they cannot obey. A poor private makes an indifferent commanding officer. The boy who does not obey his parents, who fails to do the work at school as directed, is not apt to work for his employer with any degree of satisfaction or to obey the laws of the State with very much enthusiasm.

The teacher who assumes the responsibility of the profession should know by a careful study of the law

governing, what the rights and duties of the profession are. A teacher who knows he is right goes forward with the law to assist him. When he is wrong the law must be against him. Opening and closing school for your convenience when the law sets the time, teaching on holidays when you have no authority in the schoolroom, laying the course of study aside because it may not suit your convenience, are lessons that show your pupils how you obey the laws made for your government. Can a teacher who ignores the plainest. provisions of law train pupils to be law-abiding citizens? Can such teachers complain when pupils follow their example and ignore the rules made for their government? It seems to me that if there ever was a time when teachers and parents should put forth their united efforts to train the children into a feeling of respect for law and to teach them to remove from high places those who do not obey its provisions, that time is now.

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The true end of education, of whatever kind, we must set steadily before us. "There are some who wish to know that they may know; this is a base curiosity. There are some who wish to know that they may be known; this is base vanity. There are some who wish to sell their knowledge; this is base covetousness. There are some who wish to know that they may edify; this is charity: and those who wish to be edified, and this is heavenly prudence."-Archbishop Farrar.

The new book, "Spanish In Spanish," by Professor Luis Duque, should be in the hands of euery progressive teacher of languages. It is the most practical and scientific method yet introduced. Circulars or copies for examination will be sent on request to the Whitaker & Ray Company, 723 Market street, San Francisco.

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Santa Clara College.

HE SANTA CLARA COLLEGE, conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, and situated in the best part of the Santa Clara valley, Santa Clara county, Cal., is now better equipped than ever to accommodate a large number of students, and give them a good education in scholarship, morals, and religion, at the same time supplying them with every convenience for health and comfort.

This college, founded in March, 1851, in the old mission of Santa Clara, is established for the purpose of giving to all who enter a liberal and Christian edu

nasiums and playrooms are well provided with chess, checkers, etc.

In the buildings are eighteen classrooms and two study-halls, all large and well ventilated; a chemical laboratory; a science lecture-room; a philosophical cabinet; a museum, which contains a collection of 4,000 specimens of natural curiosities; a room for the Literary Congress, divided into two branches-the Philathletic Senate and House of Philhistorians; nine libraries-five located in various departments, for the special needs of the professors and the various grades

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cation. On April 28, 1855, it was chartered with all the rights and privileges of a university.

The entrance of the college is through a three-storied building, which has a central fourth story. The hall opens on a wide interior garden, surrounded by long verandas, where grow exotic trees and plants.

The entire grounds of the college are four blocks square. On these grounds are erected the various buildings devoted to the different departments, the principal ones being the Scientific Building and the Exhibition Hall. The latter is 113 by 143 feet and 76 feet high, with a stage 38 feet deep, where the students practice the art of elocution. Here are often given. public entertainments by the Dramatic Society, which is composed of members of the student body. The hall can accommodate 3,000 spectators. There is also a chapel for the students.

Large and beautiful playgrounds four acres in extent give opportunity for healthful exercise, and the gym

of students; a banking and commercial department, with offices or houses representing every kind of important business, with telegraph, post office, etc.; a room furnished as a courtroom, to hold meetings as a tribunal of commerce; a complete school of design, mechanical and architectural, as well as artistic; a printing office, furnished with all the necessary materials for job printing; two large dormitories; a large dining-room, with tables seating fourteen students.

Music in all its branches is taught, and bands and orchestras are formed to render operatic and classical music.

In the summer season an artificial swimming pond, 160 by 120 feet, near the old mission orchard, gives to the students all the benefits and pleasures of bathing. Warm baths are in the college building.

There is also an infirmary of twenty private rooms, neatly furnished, with a well-stocked apothecary-shop adjoining. A good doctor is in attendance.

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