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BY THE SAME AUTHOR

THE GREAT FUR COMPANY. Two vols. Crown 8vo. 185.

"The interest of the narrative is maintained to the end, and on laying down the book the reader feels that the main facts and outlines of North-Eastern development have very definitely impressed themselves on his mind. To say this, is to say that Mr. Beckles Willson has known how to surmount one of the greatest difficulties of Colonial history and has made his subject generally attractive."-Times.

"In the singular mixture of exploration, dominion, commerce, and adventure, extending over two centuries, there is to be read a story of national development and of a slowly extending civilization, which can scarcely be matched in any other part of the world."-Edinburgh Review.

"From beginning to end, the book is worth reading.

It is well written, clearly arranged, and fortified with many documents. To romance there succeeds a record of practical endeavour and efficient organization and . . . we refer our readers to Mr. Willson's book with perfect confidence."-Spectator.

THE TENTH

ISLAND. Second and Revised

Edition, February, 1901.

"Turns the theme of a hundred dull blue-books into a living nineteenth-century romance. It is a vivid, almost pathetic picture of a sturdy British community fighting for the breath of freedom."-Daily Chronicle.

"The social life and commercial characteristics of an island, which, considering its geographical position as a steppingstone between the Old World and the New, is strangely isolated, are admirably set before us in these pages.". Standard.

"As full of variety, of sympathy, of light and shade, of touches of character, and of fascination, as even the most interesting among novels."-Daily Mail.

THE STORY OF LOST ENGLAND.

LORD STRATHCONA: THE STORY OF HIS LIFE.

LEDGER AND SWORD: A HISTORY OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY.

[Shortly.

THE NEW AMERICA

A STUDY OF

THE IMPERIAL REPUBLIC

BY

BECKLES WILLSON

"If you have an Empire you will have an Emperor, not perhaps in the
Old World form of a man crowned and sceptred, yet in the shape of a
centralized and practically autocratic power."-GOLDWIN SMITH.

"Continual sweeping changes cannot but be disastrous; but where
needs shift rapidly as they do here, where we often live in one year what
Europe does in ten, we need reapplication of established principles to changed
conditions."-THEODORE ROOSEVELT, September 22nd, 1902.

̓Αλλὰ μην, ἦν δ ̓ ἐγὼ εἰς ἰχανὸς γενόμενος, πόλιν ἔχων πειθομένην
ταύτ ̓ ἐπιτελέσαι τὰ νῦν ἀπιστουμένα.---PLATO, Rep. VI.

LONDON: CHAPMAN & HALL, LD.

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Reclass 5-13-30 TIE.N

PREFACE

In these pages it will be my aim to point out broadly some of the new conditions and tendencies which appear to me to prevail in the United States of America, in its external and domestic politics, in its commerce, its society, its literature.

Commentaries on conditions which pertained a decade or two ago bear an almost ludicrous disparity to the facts of 1902; and no recent writer has been more keenly conscious of this embarrassing mutability than Mr. Bryce, who declared, in the opening chapter of his "American Commonwealth," that "America changes so fast that every few years a new crop of books is needed to describe the new face which things have put on, the new problems that have appeared, the new ideas germinating among the people, the new and unexpected developments for evil as well as for good of which her established institutions have been found capable."

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