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Page.
The Swedes and Spirit-drinking

137
The Druggist's Hand-book of Practical Receipts 114
The British Journal of Homeopathy

144
The Anti-Shaving Movement

121
The Philosophy of Epidemic Cholera

166
The Vantage Ground of Truth

146
Tracts on Homöopathy

166
The History of Medicine

247, 273
The Love of Truth

151
The Advantages of Homeopathy to the Phy-
sician

154
Truth

158
The Mesmeric Guide for Family Use

166
The Physician's Censure

214
The New Medical Registration and Reform Bill 219
The Price of Health

261
The Water-cure

279
Water! by John Gibbs, Esq. 155, 180, 207, 224
Water Treatment of Scarlet Fever

254
Wearing Glasses

20
Worms in the Eye

108
Vincent Priessnitz

193

: -
Vegetarianism

246

-

-

Page.
Grape cure

47
Gymnasium in the Hospital for children at Paris 119
Hydrophobia produced by cold

96
Homeopathy is not a novelty

168
Insanity and Spiritual Manifestations

48
Illegal sale of Chicory

71
Idiosyncracy

96
Isn't it Murder?-

284
Liberty

216
Monomania

96
Medicine among the Egyptians

119
Medical Vainglory

168
Medical Precepts of Marsilius Ficinus

167
Mental Distress from Want

216
Medicine of the Hindoos

239
New House-regulation at Berlin

72
Oảe to Health

168
Palpitation of the heart cured by Soda-water 23
Prussian Medical Men

48
Poisoning by Tincture of Aconite

120
Potatoes

119
Praise of Health

167
Pulse of various Animals

284
Remarkable preservation of a Dog

71
Remedial Virtues of Ray-broth; Oil of Condor;

Oil of Rattlesnake; Oil of Scorpions ; Turtle
Broth; Viper's Flesh

95
Riotous living a cause of disease

216
Short-sightedness

23
Singular case of Hydrophobia

24
Sanitary State of Bengal

47
Sympathy between the Stomach and Skin 47
Sanitary Condition of Demerara

47
Statistics of Pythisis

119
Superstitious Practices

168
The Pulse
Treatment of Febrile and other diseases by ap-
plications to the Skin

48
The blessings of Mercury

45
The Mesopodium, or Saddle-stick

47
The Smoke Nuisance in the Metropolis

70
Thought accompanied by muscular power 95
The Beard Movement

120
True Philosophers

168
Tutela Sanitatis

167
The Voice

167
The Profession of Physic

167
The Mind in Suspense

216
The Longevity of Trees

240
The Sense of Smell

283
Town and Village Greens

281
Use of Stupefying Agents in Surgical Opera-

tions, and Hydropathy among the Ancient
Chinese

71
Value of Oatmeal as Food

239
Woollen Felt Spread with Soap or Adhesive
Plaster a preventive of Bed-sores

95
Why we should read?

168

Gleanings on Health Topics.
Advantages of Wearing Mustachios

24
Ague in new-born Children

48
Active determination of blood to the head
A Hint

96
Aneurism Produced by Fright

95
A Woman Walking against Time

120
An Orthodox Physician

167
Æsculapius

239
Anger

239
Chewing Grass

24
Case of Constipation cured

48
Cases Illustrative of the Morbid effects of heat 46
Case of partial turning white of the hair in one
night

72
Character of Allopathists

71
Comfort for Cigar Smokers

216
Cure of Dizziness and Weariness

240
Carbonaceous food and active exercise

240
Composition of different milks

239
Death from Excessive Vomiting

24
Deformed feet amongst the humbler classes 23
Death from passing a Probang,

47
Detection by the nid of Magnetism of Needles

Embedded near the surface of the body 72
Death from Hæmorrhage from Lancing the Gums 69
Death by Horseradish

96
Dialogue between a Patient and a Doctor 280
Diseases of the Stomach

282

42

95
168
240

Enormous corpulence
Experience
Education
Female Physicians
Feeding children on flesh
Fatal Prize-fight
Fire-side Reading

24
47
120
284

THE

JOURNAL OF HEALTH:

1 Planthly Alaga inr.

PHYSICAL CONDITION OF THE RURAL POOR. It is a common remark that diseases, little attention to the complaints of the and more especially those of a nervous patients whom he will find there ascharacter, are daily multiplying among

sembled. He will then learn, perhaps us. Persons, somewhat advanced in age, to his amazement, that the tillers of assure us that cases of tic doloreux, the soil, whom he has been accustomed paralysis, nervousness, hysteria, and to envy as a rough, robust race, harthe like, which are now so common as

dened against the influences of wind to come within the pale of daily expe

and weather, and altogether exempt rience, were, in their younger days, com- from the nervous and dyspeptic ailments paratively rare ; and it is certain that which plague the life of the well-fed epilepsy and lunacy have become, in a sedentary citizen, are subject (it is true, manner, endemic among our rural po- in a less degree, but still subject) to the pulation, and to so frightful an extent, manifold Protean maladies which unthat an asylum for the lunatic and idiot natural habits, acting upon enervated is required for nearly every county; and constitutions, always generate. Someis, in fact, in the course of erection in body once asked, whether any one had very many counties of this happy and ever seen a dyspeptic plough-boy. Why, prosperous island. The stalwart pea- dyspeptic plough-boys may now be seen santry, who, in the glorious fields of in any village in England; and not only Cressy and Poictiers, fought and con- dyspeptic plough-boys, but hysterical quered armies, which infinitely outnum- dairymaids, nervous hedgers and ditchers, bered their own force, are dwindling and scrofulous rickety children, as plento mere ghosts of their former selves. tiful as blackberries. And it is by nb Their thews and sinews are shrinking means pleasant to reflect that these from their sturdy proportions—their lackadaisical maids and hypochondriacal frames are losing their hardihood, and bumpkins are the lineal descendants of their nerves are becoming as delicate as the heroes who, a mere handful in point those of a boarding-school Miss. The of numbers, overran the French terrireader who may be disposed to ridicule tories, and brought two kings captives these statements, and consider them a to the court of London. mere flourish of rhetoric, has only to Where are we to look for the cau se visit, on some consulting day, the dis- of this degeneracy? Why are English pensary of any country town, and pay a peasants in the days of Queen Victoria

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nary mortals.

but pale and ineffectual shadows of the in them in a worse shape than in ordipeasants under the feudal lords and wealthy abbots of the olden time? Again: the monastry was a proprietor Alas! it is not difficult to answer this that never died; its tenantry had to do question. So long as the men of the with a deathless landlord; its lands and soil, together with the soil itself, were

houses

never changed owners; its held in a manner to belong to the great tenants were liable to none of many proprietor-so long as he could claim uncertainties that other tenants were ; their services in peace and war, and dis- its oaks had never to tremble at the axe pose of their persons almost at his of the squandering heir; its manors had pleasure, the welfare of his peasants not to dread a change of lords; its was the continual object of the noble villagers had all been born and bred up lord's or reverend churchman's solici- under its eye and care ; their character tude. Not a single individual on the was, of necessity, a thing of great estate was allowed to feel the pressure value ; and, as such, would naturally be of want-no grinding labor was exacted an object of eat attention. A mo--and their amusements and exercises

nastery was the centre of a circle in the were duly and religiously observed. It country, naturally drawing, to it all that was the glory of the nobles to rear and were in need of relief, advice, and protrain a large body of stalwart and war

tection;

and containing a body of men like retainers; and it was the boast of or of women, having no cares of their the church that those under her rule own, and having wisdom to guide the were contented and prosperous. But inexperienced, and wealth to relieve the darker times were at hand. The robber distressed. king laid his hand upon the possessions The abbot and brethren had no object of the church (which included in land in amassing money; they did not desire nearly a third of the area of England), to accumulate large sums ; for, beyond and bribed the high nobility to aid and keeping in repair and beautifying their abet his purposes, by distributing among monastery, they had no occasion for them extensive tracts of the land which

money. They were not, therefore, he had purloined. This step imme- tempted to rack-rent their tenants, nor diately pauperised an immense propor

to demand from them more than that tion of the peasantry: for the church reasonable amount of service which was proverbially a good landlord, but would willingly be rendered. But, in the new proprietors of the soil were, in addition to this, the church was many instances, very bad landlords. resident landlord, and not only expended The ecclesiastical dignitaries let their the revenues, which she derived from lands at low rents for leases of long the land, upon the land, but exercised a terms of years, very generally on life constant and wholesome supervision leases, so that, says Hume, “The farmers upon those fixed to the land; exhorting regarded themselves as a species of and reclaiming the idle and profligate, proprietors, always taking care to renew and encouraging the sober and intheir leases before they expired.' Now dustrious. The church, as a landlord, landlords of this sort necessarily created, considered herself bound to watch over by slow degrees, men of property, and the bodies and souls of her tenants. It caused to exist a class of yeomen, real was the head of a great family, and h d yeomen, independent of the aristocracy. onerous duties to perform toward the Monasteries could possess no private inferior members. More than this : the property—they could save no money; church was the schoolmistress of the they could bequeath nothing. They district. She taught gratuitously the had a life interest in their estate, and no children of the indigent as of the more. They lived, received, and ex- opulent. She kept open house for the pended in common. Historians need wandering traveller ; she distributed not have told us they were easy land- alms to the poor at her gate. lords. They must have been such, But what happened when that lying unless human nature had exhibited itself 'buffoon drest in a king's robes, as

a

Luther politely called Henry the Eighth,

abodes the ministers of this false rerobbed the church of her fair acres, ligion, and seized for his own personal and bestowed them upon his sycophant use and benefit, its goods and chattels, courtiers ? Why, in the first place, the and revenues. But it was necessary to peasantry fell under the yoke of men implant among the people true religion, who had every interest in accumulating in place of that false one, whose priests riches—of men who had wives and he had ejected, and whose revenues he children, and nephews, and creditors, had appropriated-and in order to plant and concubines, hungry for money- and promote true religion, funds were of men, who immediately began to raise desirable ; but he had no funds—that is their rents, and to ruin their tenantry. to say, none to spare, for he wanted the The abbot, as landlord, had no interest revenues of the false religion for other except that the estate, during his life, purposes ; for his wife and his children, should be flourishing and well-con- and his pleasure. He desired to keep the ditioned. The noble cared not for the gold and silver and jewels of the candlecondition of the estate, where, fre- sticks shrines, that he might melt quently, he never resided; but wanted the former down into family plate, or money for the gaming table, his favorites, present the latter to my lord the and other matters which were out of the king's last new mistress, that she might reach of his predecessor. The abbot | whisper into the king's ear a favorable spent his income upon the estate; the word, when occasion served. In short, no noble, in too many instances, wasted his matter for what the money was wanted, means in the metropolis, or in foreign it could not be spared for the service of parts. The Abbot instructed the young religion. The funds must be raised in and ignorant; the noble allowed them a different manner, and what manner of to grow up as wild as the weeds by the raising funds could be more natural than hedge-side. The abbot lodged the to take rates from the substance of stranger, and distributed alms to the

the persons who were to imbibe from poor ;

the noble refused hospitality to the lips of the new preachers the eternal the former, and evicted the latter from truths of salvation ? And so it was his domain. The abbot considered his managed. With one hand, the nobles tenants as children, whose interests it plundered the old church of her inwas his duty to overlook and protect; herited property; and with the other, the noble regarded them as machines for they plundered the people to found and raising so many crops, which he might support a new church. "Bold, impudent, sell, and grow rich. But there was yet unscrupulous rapacity, characterised another reason for the general pauperism every one implicated in the transaction. which ensued upon the transfer of This was the commencement of the church lands to the laity. While the deterioration of the English peasantry. land belonged to the church, ecclesi- Transferred en masse from the protecastical buildings, and the ministers of tion of their beloved masters, to the religion, were supported by the rent of crushing yoke of, in many cases, arrothe land; but when the layman seized gant, merciless, absentee lords, who rethe property of the church, and drove cognised no reciprocal duties between out the ancient clergy to starve or beg, themselves and their dependents; they his natural piety would not permit him fell into a state of chronic pauperism, to leave the inhabitants of the district disgraceful to the country: and from that destitute of spiritual comfort, and he, time to this, matters have continued therefore, took care to provide ministers much the same. The modern proof the reformed creed-adding only the prietors of the soil esteem the children trifling stipulation that the new ministers of the soil an encumbrance which is should be supported by the farmers and only to be tolerated as long as it pays a peasants benefited by their presence. decent rent, and does not too much The layman, being conscientiously con- obstruct the improvements which they vinced that the old religion was false intend to carry out.

Landlords hold and idolatrous, expelled from their the children born upon the land to be as

nary mortals.

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own,

but pale and ineffectual shadows of the in them in a worse shape than in ordi-
peasants under the feudal lords and
wealthy abbots of the olden time? Again: the monastry was a proprietor
Alas! it is not difficult to answer this that never died; its tenantry had to do
question. So long as the men of the with a deathless landlord; its lands and
soil, together with the soil itself, were houses never changed owners ; its
held in a manner to belong to the great

tenants were liable to none of many
proprietor-so long as he could claim uncertainties that other tenants were ;
their services in peace and war, and dis- its oaks had never to tremble at the axe
pose of their persons almost at his of the squandering heir; its manors had
pleasure, the welfare of his peasants not to dread a change of lords ; its
was the continual object of the noble villagers had all been born and bred up
lord's or reverend churchman's solici- under its eye and care; their character
tude. Not a single individual on the was, of necessity, a thing of great
estate was allowed to feel the pressure value; and, as such, would naturally be
of want—no grinding labor was exacted an object of great attention. A mo-
and their amusements and exercises nastery was the centre of a circle in the
were duly and religiously observed. It country, naturally drawing to it all that
was the glory of the nobles to rear and were in need of relief, advice, and pro-
train a large body of stalwart and war- tection; and containing a body of men
like retainers; and it was the boast of or of women, having no cares of their
the church that those under her rule and having wisdom to guide the
were contented and prosperous. But inexperienced, and wealth to relieve the
darker times were at hand. The robber distressed.
king laid his hand upon the possessions The abbot and brethren had no object
of the church (which included in land in amassing money; they did not desire
nearly a third of the area of England), to accumulate large sums ; for, beyond
and bribed the high nobility to aid and keeping in repair and beautifying their
abet his purposes, by distributing among monastery, they had no occasion for
them extensive tracts of the land which

money. They were not, therefore, he had purloined. This step imme- tempted to rack-rent their tenants, nor diately pauperised an immense propor- to demand from them more than that tion of the peasantry: for the church reasonable amount of service which was proverbially a good landlord, but would willingly be rendered. But, in the new proprietors of the soil were, in addition to this, the church was many instances, very bad landlords. resident landlord, and not only expended The ecclesiastical dignitaries let their the revenues, which she derived from lands at low rents for leases of long the land, upon the land, but exercised a terms of years, very generally on life constant and wholesome supervision leases, so that, says Hume, “The farmers upon those fixed to the land; exhorting regarded themselves as

a species of and reclaiming the idle and profligate, proprietors, always taking care to renew and encouraging the sober and intheir leases before they expired.' Now dustrious. The church, as a landlord, landlords of this sort necessarily created, considered herself bound to watch over by slow degrees, men of property, and the bodies and souls of her tenants. It caused to exist a class of yeomen, real was the head of a great family, and h d yeomen, independent of the aristocracy. onerous duties to perform toward the Monasteries could possess no private inferior members. More than this : the property—they could save no money; church was the schoolmistress of the they could bequeath nothing. They district. She taught gratuitously the had a life interest in their estate, and no children of the indigent as of the more. They lived, received, and ex- opulent. She kept open house for the pended in common. Historians need wandering traveller she distributed not have told us they were easy land- alms to the poor at her gate. lords.' They must have been such, But what happened when that 'lying unless human nature had exhibited itself buffoon drest in a king's robes, as

а

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