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THE

AMERICAN

Journal of Education.

EDITED BY

HENRY BARNARD, LL.D.

VOLUME IV.

HARTFORD, F. C. BROWNELL.

LONDON: TRÜBNER & co., 12 PATERNOSTER ROW

1857.

ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by HENRY BARNARD,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Connecticut.

he year 1857, by

f Connecticut.

American Journal of Education.

No. X.-SEPTEMBER, 1857.

CONTENTS.

66

Table. Summary of American Institutions for the Blind in 1857.

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Preface......

Annotations. Sir William Cecil; advice to his son..

IX. LIFE AND EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM OF JOHN STURM..

175?

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XII. CULTIVATION OF THE REFLECTIVE FACULTIES. By William Russell..

199

XIII. LETTERS TO A Young TEACHER. By Gideon F. Thayer, ......

219

Reading....

219

XIV. INSTRUCTION IN DRAWING. By M. A. Dwight....

229

XV. CATECHISM ON METHODS OF TEACHING. Translated from the German, by Dr.

Hermann Wimmer......

233

1. Intuitional Instruction. By Diesterweg..

233

2. Reading. By Honcamp.....

234

3. Arithmetic. By Diesterweg.

237

4. Geometry. By Diesterweg...

239

5. Natural History. By Hintze...

240

6. Natural Philosophy. By Diesterweg.

242

7. Astronomy. By Diesterweg....

243

XVI. EDUCATIONAL MISCELLANY AND INTELLIGENCE..

245

GERMANY.—Communication by Dr. Wimmer..

245

PRUSSIA.— New Regulations from Common Schools.

245

Plan of Lessons prescribed for Gymnasia..

245

Reform of Normal Schools....

Educational Expenditures in 1856..

246

Educational Statistics in 1856..

246

Holstein.-Real School in Rendsburg..

250

HANOVER.-High School for girls in Hanover ..

250

Real Schools......

250

WEIMAR.-School Statistics

250

SAXONY.-Real Schools..

252

Examination of Teachers.

252

School of Modern Languages.

252

School of Forrestry at Tharand..

252

Teachers Mutual Aid Society...

252

Commercial Schools.....

252

Pestalozzian Association....

252

Royal Industrial School at Chemnitz..

252

Sunday School at Chemnitz....

256

Dr. Georgi of Dresden...

256

Burgher School at Leipsic......

256

Austria.—Employment of children in Exhibitions,

257

School Statistics......

257

BAVARIA.-Real School of Nuremberg..

257

School of History ....

257

FRANCE.-Public Schools in Paris..

257

FRANKFORT.--School Statistics..

257

BADEN.-Gymnasia and Real Schools...

257

HAMBURG.-Kindergarten.....

257

HESSE.-Normal School for Jewish Teachers...

258

ITEMS. General Assembly of German Teachers..

258

Scarcity of Teachers......

258

Expenses of a German Schoolmaster..

Expenses at Eton College in 1560..

259

XVII. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LITERATURE OF EDUCATION..

261

List of Books..

261

Extracts from Prof. Masson's Lecture. College and Self Education.

262

Scope of Education...

262

The School of the Family..

262

The School of Locality..

262

The School of Travel, Books and Friendship..

266

Educational Office of Colleges ..

Oral Teaching......

XVIII Notices of New Publications,

272

I. MEMOIR OF EDMUND DWIGHT:

BY FRANCIS BOWEN,

Professor of Moral Philosophy in Harvard College, Mass.

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The services of the late Edmund Dwight to the cause of common school education were numerous and important enough to earn for him the title of a great public benefactor. During his lifetime, they were but little known beyond the small circle of his intimate friends, and of those who were closely associated with him in his labors. It was his pleasure that it should be so. His taste was nice even to fastidiousness; and any public mention of what he had done, seemed to grate upon his feelings and to lessen in his opinion the efficiency of his work. The agency which is bruited abroad, appeared to him, partly by bringing the motives of the agent into suspicion, and partly by mingling personal considerations with the cause, to lose in force what it gained in notoriety. In reference to the workings of society and government, he was deeply convinced of the truth, that far the most important and beneficial results are produced by that part of the social machinery which is most quiet in its operations, and consequently attracts the least notice and remark. He made it a condition of his numerous benefactions to the cause of common schools, that his name should not be mentioned in connection with them; and

1 whatever of personal effort, of time and attention, he contributed to the same end, was in like manner studiously kept back from public observation and acknowledgment. During his lifetime, his friends respected his wishes in this particular; but death has removed the seal of secrecy, and the story of what he accomplished ought now to be told, in order to discharge a debt of gratitude from the public, and to set forth a useful example to others.

Other considerations impart interest to a notice of Mr. Dwight's life and character. He was an eminent member of a remarkable class of men,—the merchant princes of Boston during the last half century,-a class remarkable alike from the nature of the enterprises by which they acquired their wealth, from the high qualities of intellect and character which were manifested in their undertakings, and from the munificence of their public and private charities. He was the compeer and associate of the Eliots, the Appletons, the Lawrences, th: Perkinses, and other distinguished merchants, whose liberality, foresight, and public spirit have contributed so largely, not only to the

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