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ARLY in the morning of Saturday, December 22, 1923, our offices and stock rooms at 609
Mission Street, San Francisco, were totally destroyed by fire. It was rather a left handed
Christmas present but we refuse to be downhearted. We saved all our ledgers and most of our
correspondence and records.

We wish to take this opportunity to thank the California School Book Depository for
their courtesy and generosity in allowing us to share temporarily their splendid quarters at 149
New Montgomery Street. Nearly every publisher in San Francisco very generously offered
us every courtesy and assistance and invited us to make their offices our temporary headquar-
ters. We wish we could have accepted them all, but it was bad enough to have our wits
scattered without scattering our employees. We thank you all just the same. Don't tell us the
Christmas Spirit is dead. We know better.

Every order received since the fire has been given prompt telegraphic attention and filled. immediately from one of our western depositories or one of our eastern branches.

We have secured permanent quarters at 350 MISSION STREET, commodious, conveniently located, beautiful. In two or three weeks we shall be able to give prompt and careful attention to all orders-the sort of service you have learned to expect from us. We had some stock in the warehouse and our new stock, wired for immediately after the fire, is beginning to come in already.

We shall have ample stock for the opening of school and college, so don't hesitate to send in your order.

Come and see us. We should be "all fixed up" and ready to receive visitors by the time this issue of Overland Monthly reaches you. You will find us comfortably settled in spacious, light offices, with the largest stock in the West.

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
By T. C. Morehouse

Evidently the old Mother was quite good enough for the whole family-to her bewilderment. "I heard of a fine dressmaker-Imogene was always saying how much younger I'd look if I dressed in style. I did it to please her and you dear. Do let me get off these tight slippers!"

"Thanks be, you're not obliged to wear any of these duds," Father said, fervently, and carried Mother away to the old easy chair. "Now we'll really get down to living again."

That night Imogene wrote happily in her dairy:

"Anyway, Mother likes the new things. But never, never, NEVER Will I try to make anybody over. Unless, of course, they ask me to. And even then I'll first count ten. I've found out that to meddle with other people's affairs is most always to bungle.

P. S.-I don't like surprises. Father says he doesn't either."

(Continued from page 92) greeting on the fly leaf. Thus are the laureates of California and Oregon united.

Ruth Fargo, the successful writer of short stories, has had two poems pub

lished recently: one in Independent Wo-
man and another, "Prescience" in Prog-
ress, organ of Child Conservation
League of America.

A very interesting session of the Salem
Writers' League was recently enter-
tained at Mrs. Franklin's home, where
Mrs. C. V. Barton read for criticism
a realistic story woven around the burn-
ing of the flax plant at the penitentiary.

It was a coincidence that another mem-
ber, Mrs. J. C. Nelson, also presented
a story founded on the same theme.
Poems were given by Edna Garfield,
Prof. Peck and Mr. De Spain.

The Writers' Club of Willamette
University is under the guidance of
Prof. Williston of the Department of
English Literature. The students sub-
mit anonymous productions for criticism
and discussion and much interest is
aroused and progress made.

J. K. Gill recently had a very attractive display window of Anthony Euwer's new book of poems, "By Scarlet Torch and Blade." What James Whitcomb Riley is to Indiana Anthony Euwer is to Oregon, and he is also rapidly winning national fame as a poet, artist and lecturer.

Much interest is awakened in the competition for the prize poem to be written for the dedication of the statue

of The Circuit Rider which R. A. Booth is presenting to Oregon. It will be unveiled in February. The sculptor is Prof. Fairbanks of University of Oregon, and Mr. Booth thus honors his father, a minister of early Oregon times.

California has gained a member of the Oregon Writers' League, Miss Ariel Dunn, well known as a writer for trade journals. She goes to Los Angeles to edit three periodicals. Our President, Anne Shannon Monroe, has also gone to Santa Barbara to spend the winter where she writes that she is getting a working knowledge of how "movies are built." Her many admirers are waiting longingly for the appearance of her novel. Sweet and comforting was the philosophy in her article, "The Music Under the Noise" in Good Housekeeping for December.

Marguerite Norris Davis has written a sympathetic sketch of "Our Own" Samuel Lancaster, creator of the famous Columbia River Highway, for St. Nicholas.

Mable Holmes Parsons is writing some thought-stimulating book reviews for the Oregon Journal's "Book and Writers' Page." Her versatility is apparent when it is known that she is a popular Professor of Literature in the U. of O., a writer of beautiful lyrics, an author of many literary studies.

(Continued from page 49) ANNICE CALLAND is with us again in a desert poem of typical charm. HONORIA TUOMEY is another of Overland's valued contributors who is with us after a silence of some time. Her research into the romantic history of the period of Russian occupation of California has given her widespread fame.

MADEFREY ODHNER is one of San Francisco's young business men. Poetry is an avocation.

JAMES CLYDE BAILEY is a name which various magazines-some thirtyfive of them have printed his verse, stories and other material-have spread broadcast. His verse is a product of the last two years.

ETHELYN BOURNE BORLAND, TORREY CONNOR, NANCY BUCKLEY, ALBERTA WING COLWELL these are all familiar names to Overland readers of verse.

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A POETS' DINNER!

The California Writers' Club of California, an organization made up of professional writers of novels, stories, poetry and drama, makes the interesting. announcement that a "Poets' Dinner" is to be given on February 12.

The guests of honor are to be California's well-loved Ina Coolbrith, Poet Laureate, and Miss Jessie Rittenhouse. There will be many other nationally known poets, visiting and resident, at the dinner and it promises to be a memorable affair.

In view of the fact that the committee in charge cannot get in touch with all visiting and resident celebrities in person, it has been decided to depart from usual custom and issue a general invitation to all poets and writers to be present, whether they are members of the club or not. Reservations should be made through the secretary of the club not later than February 10, with check enclosed at $1.00 a plate.

The dinner will be held at 6:30 Tuesday evening, February 12, in Berkeley, at the Varsity Candy Shop, corner of Bancroft Way and Telegraph Ave. For reservations address Mrs. James C. Bennett, Secretary California. Writers' Club, 388 Fairmount Ave., Oakland, California.

BEAUTIFUL HOMES

"HAVE

AVE NOTHING IN YOUR HOME THAT YOU DO NOT KNOW TO BE USEFUL, OR BELIEVE TO BE BEAUTIFUL," SAID WILLIAM MORRIS, THE MASTER CRAFTSMAN. IT IS THE GOLDEN RULE FOR FURNISHING ARTISTIC HOMES.

MACEY SECTIONAL BOOKCASES ARE ADAPTED TO THIS IDEA. THEY POSSESS THE BEAUTY OF THE OLD MASTER DESIGNS, BUT ADD THE PRACTICAL ADVANTAGE OF BEING SECTIONAL. THEY MAY BE BUILT UP AND ADDED TO, RE-ARRANGED, TAKEN APART OR EASILY MOVED ABOUT. THEY ARE DESIGNED NEVER TO LOSE THEIR SYMMETRY AND CHARM NO MATTER WHAT THE ARRANGEMENT.

MACEY BOOKCASES DO NOT LOOK SECTIONAL -BUT THEY ARE

Catalogue No. 222 J. M. J. will give full information Write to us.

C. F. WEBER & COMPANY

985 MARKET STREET

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA

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Marshaling the Telephone Forces

In the simple act of lifting the telephone receiver from its hook every subscriber becomes the marshal of an army. At his service, as he needs them, a quarter of a million men and women are organized in the Bell System. One skilled corps of the telephone army moves to place him in talking connection with his neighbor in the next block, in the next state or across the continent. Another highly trained corps is on duty to keep the wires in condition to vibrate with his words. Still others are developing better apparatus and methods, manufacturing and adding new equipment, and installing new telephones to increase the subscriber's realm of command.

The terrain of the telephone army is the whole United States, dotted with 14,000,000 instruments, all within range of the subscriber's telephone voice. Even in the remote places this army provides equipment and supplies. Its methods of operation are constantly being improved, that each user may talk to his friends with increased efficiency. Millions of money are spent in its permanent works. Yet its costs of operation are studiously held to the minimum, that the subscriber may continue to receive the cheapest as well as the best telephone service in the world.

The permanent objective of the Bell System army is to meet the telephone needs of the nation—a hopeless task were not its command unified, its equipment adequately maintained and its personnel trained in the latest developments of telephone art.

TELEGRAPH CO

COMPANIES

AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY AND ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

BELL SYSTEM

One Policy, One System, Universal Service

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