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INDEX TO VOL. C..

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ARNOLD, Matthew : his “ Culture and Anarchy" re. Tyndale, Bishop Bale, and others, 37, 38; our
viewed, 100 seg. See Man.

early printers chiefly occupied with works in the

vernacular, 38; translations from the classica
CARIST, Dr. Hanna's Life of, 167; success of the 39, and their influence on the language, 40

two earlier volumes, 168; Dr. Young's “ Christ of Shakespeare's dramatic works, ib., 44, 45
History," ib. ; the problem as to the religious sig- changes affecting the language during the perio
vificance of the life of Christ, one of historical of the Revolution,-English literature after th
philosophy, 169; the idea of rewriting the life of Restoration, 40 ; fashionable Gallicisms, 41, 42
Jesus a modern conception, ib. ; Socrates and literature of Queen Anne's reign, 42; alleged re
Christ, 170; psychological and critical study of finement of the language, 43; Dryden, and h
the Gospels, 171; early efforts—Jeremy Taylor, criticism of the Elizabethan dramatists, 43,45
ib.; Hess, Herder, Paulus, 172; Schleiermacher, Addison and bis writings, 45; his criticism
Hase, ib.; Strauss's “Life of Jesus," 170, 173 ; Milton's language, 46,47; and protest against n
his treatment of the supernatural, ib. ; the mythi- ologisms, 47; Alexander Pope, 48; Johnson, an
cal theory, 174 ; the works of Neander, 175, and his criticism of Shakespeare, 48, 49; Dryden
Renan, 175, 176 ; the latter replied to by Edmond version of “Troilus and Cressida,” 49, 50 ; infil
de Pressensé, 176, 177 ; Ellicott's Bampton Lec- ence of the events in the latter half of the eig
tures, 177; Dr. Kitto's Illustrations --work of teenth century on the literature of the nineteent
Rev. Isaac Williams, -and Ecce Homo, 177, 178; 50,-exuberance of original poetic genius, ib
prerequisites to an adequate biography, 178; char- contrast between the close of the sixteenth a
acteristics of Dr. Hanna's work, 178, 179; the that of the eighteenth century, 50, 51; exparsi
influence of Nature on Christ, 179 ; Dean Stanley, of social and political interests, and its intellect
ib. ; break and sequences in the Evangelical nar- al effect, 51 ; the work of reflective expansion
ratives, 179, 180; the soundings of moral evidence our native vocabulary, 52.
in Dr. Hanna's work, 180 ; indirect signs of the European Morals, -History of, by W. E. H. Lec
supernatural in Christ's life, 181 ; its consistent 202; object of the work, ib.; apparent incons
harmony shown, contrary to Renan, De Wette, tencies in it, 202, 203; moral condition of
Paulus, 181, 182; instances of Christ's unparalleled Roman Empire, 204; mortifying result of
assumptions, if only human, 182, 183; the Great teachings of Pagan philosophy, ib.; contenti-
Commission, 184 ; problems underlying the nar- between the Stoics and the Epicureans, 205;
rative, 184, 185 ; the nature of our Lord's resur- Aluence of the conquests of Alexander, ib.;
rection body, 185; the fundamental feature which dogma of universal brotherhood, 206; Christi
distinguishes this life from those by Strauss and ity in the Empire, ib.; position of women ur
Renan, 186 ; the question of the miraculous, its influence, ib.; success and ultimate triump
187 ; the natural and supernatural, ib.; the eg- Christianity, how accounted for, 207; two of
gential nature of a miracle, 188 ; the Ideal real- most important human causes——(1.) Doctrin
ized in One Human Life, 189.

future life, 207, 208; (2.) Formation of a str

character, 208, 209; Constantine the Great,
DANISH Literature ; see Holberg.

the progress of moral ideas and practice in

first ages of Christianity, 210; excesses and
EARLY History of Man: His antiquity-Ancient versions of its real force, ib.; misapprehensio:

Egypt, 272, 274; China, 274 ; the “mother- volved in the charge brought against Christia
tribe" of the Indo-Europeans, ib. ; archæology, as to its discouragement of patriotism, 210,
276, 277 ; Primitive state, 277 ; definition of ci- the toleration of the Roman government, 215
vilisation, 278 ; the grouping of men in societies, exemplified while conquering and triumphant,
278, 281; Sir George Grey's hypothesis, 281; and under reverses, 213; persecution of the
progress in arts and sciences, 282; language- tians, ib. ; the full effect of Christian princip
its origin, 282, 283 ; systems of religion, 283, 284; domestic life under the Empire, unrecorded,
method of studing early bistory, 286 ; inequali- the history of European morals leaves no imp
ties of development, 286, 288 ; symbols of law ment on the claim of Christianity to be divine

and ceremony, 288, 289 ; summary, 290.
English language, revolutions in its history, 34 ; GEOLOGICAL Time, 215; trade-unionism in sc

the great creative period of English literature that 216; Hooker on Lyell, ib. ; use of matben
of the Reformation, 35 ; contrast between it and 217; the anonymous writer in the Pall Ma
the productive epoch of our literature, ib. ; spirit zette, ib.; the grand question in geology,
of nationality expressed, 36 ; reign of Henry the Uniformitarian school, ib.; Dr. Hooker
VIII., ib. ; influence of the Reformation on our dress, 219; place assigned to mathematics
language, 37 ;-through translations of works by controversy, ib.; resistance to planets' me
Continental Reformers, ib.; and by the controver- 220; resistance offered by the tides to the
sies it provoked-Sir Thomas More and William rotation, ib.; tidal reaction on the moon, 221

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this bears on the speculations of geologists, ib.; for the Moral Philosophy Chair in Edinburgh,
argument from earth's figure, 222; the Uniformi- 259; election to tbat of Civil History, ib.; his
tarian hypothesis disproved, 222, 223 ; examina- marriage, and its influence on his character and
tion of Professor Huxley's Address, 223 seq.; subsequent career, 259, 260; researches in Phre-
British popular geology, 225; Sir W. Thomson's nology, 260 ; Mr. Carlyle's reminiscences of him,
Reply, 226; periods required by Uniformitarians, 260, 261; bis first appearance as a critic, in 1829,
227; general survey of the subject, 228 seq.; in Edinburgh Review, 261,262; subsequent con-
Thomson's three arguments, 228, 231 ; answer to tributions to that Journal, 262; contest for the
Huxley's charge of inconsistency, 231, 232; the Chair of Logic in 1836, 263,264; opening of the
reasoning in Thomson's arguments strictly cu- class, 264; description of the class-room, 265 ;

mulative, 232; triumph of scientific truth, 232, 233. sketch by Professor Baynes, 265, 266; remini-
Germany, Reconstruction of, 133; the battle of scences by Dr. Cairns, 266; work of the class,

Sadowa, and its results, ib. ; exceptional position 266,267; courtesy to his students, and the gener-
of Germany amongst her neighbours from the al effect and value of his teaching, 267; influence
first dawn of her history, 133, 134; the French of his writings in America--passage from a pa-
Revolution, 134; history of the Confederation per by Professor Porter, 268; his edition of
of the Rhine, 135 ; its contract with France, Reid's Works, ib.; honours conferred on him
ib. ; the battle of Jena, ib. ; the history of from abroad, ib.; small recognition of his claims
Prussia between 1807 and 1813 the turning in his own country, 269 ; struck by paralysis in
point in the history of Germany, 135,136 ; 1814, ib.; the pensiou, 270; Sir William in his
the war of liberation, ib.; Prussia and Aus- latter days, 270,271; his edition of Dugald Stew-
tria, 136,137; Prussia at the Vienna Congress, art's Works, 271; unfinished literary labours,
137; King Frederick-William ill., 138; neither 271,272; last years, illness, and death, 272.
freedom nor union for Germany gained at Vienna, Holberg, Ludvig,--the father of modern Danish
ib.; Baron von Stein, ib. ; Act of the Germanic literature, 233; no national literature before him,
Confederation, 139,-its distinctive character, ib.; 233,234; parentage, 234; visit to Holland, ib.;
the Frankfort Diet, 139,140; policies of Austria visits England, and studies at Oxford, 234,235 ;
and Prussia subsequent to the Final Act of 1820, returns to Copenhagen and lectures on his trav-
140 ; Germany's political professors, 140,141; the els, 235; publishes his first work, ib.; his visit to
“Staatenbund," 141, and the “Bundesstaat," ib. ; Rome, and return to Copenhagen, where he is
the discussions of 1848-49 in the Frankfort Par- appointed Professor of Latin and Rhetoric, 236;
liament, 142; the crown of Germany offered to period of literary activity, 236, 237; his illness
the King of Prussia, but declined, 143,144 ; the and death, 237,238; his simple mode of life, 238 ;
new Confederacy proposed by Prussia, 144 ; Aus- distinctive features of his genius, ib.; his desire to
tria summons the Diet to meet at Frankfort, ib.; found a national literature, 239; his strength as a
the subsequent conflict, 145, 146; the Italian war moralist, and his weakness, 239, 240 ; his influence
gives the signal for the resuscitation of the Ger- on the language, 240,241 ; his three principal
man question, 146; the campaign of 1859, 147; works~"Peder Paars," 241; "Niels Klim,"
the attitude of the several governments interested 242, and the Comedies, 243; comparison between
in the solution of the German question, 147,148; Holberg and Molière, 244; translations, from one
incidents of the political campaign between the of his comedies, “Erasmus Montanus," 244,249 ;
Great Germans and the Little Germans, 148, 149 ; charges brought against his comedies, 249, 250;
the programme of reform issued by the Wurz- the "Epistles," 250; influence of his works on
burg Coalition, 149; replies of Austria and Prus- the minds of his contemporaries, 250,251.
sia, 150; formation of the Bismarck ministry at Hudson's Bay Company, The : origin, history, and
Berlin, 150,151, and the legacies bequeathed to present condition of the Red River Settlement, 83,
him by his predecessors, 151,152; the two lines 84; Sebastian Cabot-Henry Hudson-Prince Ru-
of policy taken up by him, 152 ; aspect of the con- pert, 84; nature of the Company's title, 84, 85;
flict with the Würzburg Coalition at this time, Parliament petitioned in 1690, by the traders, 85 ;
153 ; eventful conversation between Bismarck the Company's failure, 86; the first legislative in-
and the Austrian Minister at Berlin, 153,154 ; in- quiry into its affairs, ib.; the North-West Fur Com-
terview between the Emperor of Austria and the pany, 87; rivalry and warfare between the Com-
King of Prussia, 154; a Congress of Sovereigns panies, and their subsequent amalgamation, ib.;
'proposed shortly afterwards by Austria, ib., de- the Charter of the Company denounced as illegal
clined by Prussia, ib.; the Austrian programme, -opinion of counsel as to its validity, ib. ; Lord
155,156; reply of the Prussian cabinet, 157 ; in- Brougham's opinion, 88; Right Hon. Edward
dependent action of the two great Powers, 158; Ellice, ib. ; misgovernment of Red River Settle-
the controversy interrupted by the death of the ment, and grievances of the settlers, 88, 89; the
King of Denmark, ib.; subsequent events till the Hudson's Bay dispute, 90; the Company's preten-
battle of Sadowa, ib. ; reconstructed Germany, sions, ib.; the portion of territory styled the
158,160 ; examination of the North German Con- Fertile Belt, ib.; the character of the country
stitution, 162,166.

misrepresented by the Company's officials, ib. seq.;

Sir Goorge Simpson's paradox, 91 ; expeditions to
HAMILTON, Sir William,—Memoir of, 251 ; birth and explore the country, 91, 92; route to the Rocky

parentage, 252; early studies, 253; at Glasgow Mountains, 92; testimony of the independent ex-
and Oxford Universities, 253,254; intimate plorers, Lord Milton and Dr. Cheadle, ib.; change
friends, 254 ; Mr. Christie's Oxford reminiscences, of opinion indicated in the Company's last pros-
254, 255; additional particulars by Mr. Traill, 255, pectus, 98; the Company and the Stock-Ex-
266; final examination for his degree at Oxford, change, ib.; agitation in the Dominion of Canada
256; studies for the Scottish Bar, and passes as as to the acquisition of the Company's territory,
advocate, ib.; adjudged heir-male to Sir Robert 94; Canadian forests, ib.; definition of the foot.
Hamilton of Preston, ib.; the patrimonial estate, ing on which the Company was to stand in rela-
ib. ; notice of his ancestors, ib.; career at the Bar, tion to the Dominion, 95; Mr. Gladstone's propo-
257; his merits unrecognised, 257,258; life in sitions, 95, 96; the “Rupert's Land Act, 1868,"
Edinburgh, 1813 to 1820-anecdote of this period 96 ; Colonial administration, 96, 97; desirability
given by Professor Baynes, 258,259; candidature of extinguishing the claims of the Company by

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an immediate payment in cash, 97; our imperial lums in England and Wales, Scotland, and Ireland,
policy, 98; Canada as a field for emigration, ib.; ib.; nature and causes of the increase, ib.; the
route to the East through the Dominion of Cana- numbers admitted into asylums during the last
da, 99; importance of having this controversy ten years, 65, 66; discharges and admissions une-
with the Hudson's Bay Company finally settled, qual 66, 67; private and pauper lunatics, ib.; dif-
ib.; probable issue of its settlement, ib.

ferent classes of the discharged, 67, 68; the cura-

ble and incurable, 68; the question as to the
INDIA, - Public Works in: want of roads, 119; ap- possibility of providing for some of the insane

plication of the term “ Public Works,” 120; the poor otherwise than in asylums, with probable ben-
means available for work-forced labour, ib.; efit, 69, 70; the Report of the Scotch Commis-
the idea of “Government" to a Hindu, ib. ; com- sioners on this question, 70; desirability of pro-
pulsory labour under the Mogul Shabs, 120, 121; viding for this class less pretentious buildings, 71;
peculiar position of the British Government in the additions in constant demand in County and
India, 121; its results-much writing, little work- District Asylums, 71, 72; remedies proposed : (1.)
ing, ib.; difficulties and drawbacks to the opera- transference to buildings intermediate in character
tions of the Public Works department, 121, 122 ; between work-houses and asylums, 73, 74; (2.)
responsibilities of the officers, 122; their work, transference to the workhouse, 74 ; condition of
122, 123; financial arrangements, 124; the the insane in workhouses, ib.—in England, 74,
American blockade and the supply of cotton, 75-in Scotland, ib.--and in Ireland, 76; (3.)
125; need of assistance for works in India, ib.; transference to private dwellings, ib.; state of
inducements to lay out money in improving pauper lunatics so disposed of at present, in Eng-
India, 125, 126, staff of the Department, 126 ; engi- land, 77-in Scotland, 78; seq.-- and in Ireland,
neering Colleges, ib.; labour and labourers in India, 79; results of the examination of the three propo-
127 ; Major Chesney's “Indian Polity," 127, 128 ; sed outlets for the chronic insane in asylums, 79,
State versus private enterprise, 128 ; operations 80; recent provisions of the law to keep down un
connected with irrigation, ib.; road-making hin- due accumulation in establishments, 80, 81 ; oth-
dered by the want of suitable materials, 129 ; er considerations affecting this question, 81; mad
railways, tramways, and bridges, 130; the con- houses and asylums, ib. ; reform in treatment of
tract system, ib. ; what is necessary to make the the insane, 82; importance of early treatment of
Public Works department really useful, 130, 131; the disease, ib.; the relations between menta
administration of the department, 131; copse- and bodily health, 83; importance of the whol
quences of the minute system of supervision at subject, ib.
present exercised, 132; the question of Russian
invasion, ib. ; importance and necessity of enlist- Man, Early History of; see Early,
ing on our side the interests and sympathies of Man's Chief End, -What is it ? 100; Mr. Arnold o
the people of India, 133.

“Culture and Anarchy," ib. ; the ideal of cultur
Irish Church Measure, 300; Lord Salisbury on the and its realization, 101; thesis to be proved,-

functions of the House of Lords, ib. ; his advice that culture prosecuted with a view to the enti
with regard to its present action, 301, 302; it is perfection of our manhood and the reflex glory o
more than a Senate, 302; the attainment of God, is the one absolute and untransferable end
equality between the confessions the present human existence, ib.; what are the essentials
problem, 303 ; policy of Gladstone and Bright, ib. ; human nature ? 101, 102; “man's chief end”
The Irish Church Bill and its object, 303, 304; its defined by the Westminster divines, 102, 103 ; to
character as passed by the House of Commons, educational schemes of so-called “practical mer
304, 305; examination of Mr. Disraeli's speech on vitiated by a fundamental flaw, 103, 104; tE
the second reading, 305, 306; the question of doctrine of culture not separative and exclusi
endowments, 307, 308; position of the Church as but intensely social, 104 ; a well-educated mi
contemplated by the Bill, 309; arrangements for sympathizes with other departments of study th
the employment of the surplus, 310; Maynooth those it is specially acquainted with, 105; id-
and the Regium Donum, ib.; tithes, ib. ; general of an educated life, 105, 106; the religious face
justice of the measure, 310, 311; present state of ty, 106, 107; the relation in wbich religious
Ireland, 311; effect of the large majorities in the ture stands to human perfection, 107; operat
House on the great body of the people, 311, 312; of the law of intellectual and moral habit, 1
the new Irish Lord Chancellor, 312; to what are three results of recognising the ideal, as here
the recent outrages in Ireland to be attributed ? fined, 108, 109; can this ideal be realized ? 1
313, 314 ; liberation of the Fenian prisoners, 315; obstacles and objections, 110, 111; summary
the banquet at Cork, 316; demonstrations against the laws of culture, 111, 112 ; Mr. Arnold's tea
the Bill in the North, ib.; amendments to be in- ing on this subject, 112; Hellenism and Hebrai
troduced in the House of Lords, 317; generosity 113 ; contrast between the two tendencies so
and justice, 318.

signated, 113, 114; Mr. Arnold's doctrine lays

much stress on thought, and indefinitely postpo
LANDOR, Walter Savage,-Forster's biography of, action, 114; his anticipations of the future so
290; birth and parentage, 291, 292; his way. what sad, 116; and why, his range

of cul
wardness as a boy, 292; at Rugby school, 293 ; unduly narrowed, 115, 116; his antagonisn.
his year at Oxford, 294 ; Dorothea Lyttleton, ib.; machinery,” 116; the austerity of his atti
becomes an author, 295 ; writes political articles towards his own generation, 117; his classi
--visit to Paris, 295, 296; residence at Bath- tion of British society, 118; “whence do
“Ianthe," 296 ; raid into Spain-purchase of come ?" " whither do we tend ?" 118, 119.
Llanthony, 296, 297 ; marriage with Julia Thuil. Milman's (Dean) " Annals of St. Paul's,” 52
lier, 297 ; settles at Florence till 1835, when he early life, and literary labours, 52, 53; car
returned to Bath, 297, 298; acquaintanceships editing of the “ Annals," 54; notices of
formed there--Forster, Dickens, Eliza Lynn, 298 ; Deans, ib.; and Bishops of London, 55; the
death at Florence, ib.; description of his person, mour and urbanity of his writings, ib. ; his
ib.; his love of children, 299; remarks on his compared with that of Gibbon, 56, 57; ch
genius, ib.

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this bears on the speculations of geologists, ib.; for the Moral Philosophy Chair in Edinburgh,
argument from earth’s figure, 222; the Uniformi- 259; election to that of Civil History, ib.; his
tarian hypothesis disproved, 222, 223; examina- marriage, and its influence on his character and
tion of Professor Huxley's Address, 223 seq.; subsequent career, 259,260; researches in Phre-
British popular geology, 225; Sir W. Thomson's nology, 260 ; Mr. Carlyle's reminiscences of him,
Reply, 226; periods required by Uniformitarians, 260, 261; his first appearance as a critic, in 1829,
227; general survey of the subject, 228 seq.; in Edinburgh Review, 261, 262; subsequent con-
Thomson's three arguments, 228, 231; answer to tributions to that Journal, 262; contest for the
Huxley's charge of inconsistency, 231, 232; the Chair of Logic in 1836, 263,264; opening of the
reasoning in Thomson's arguments strictly cu- class, 264; description of the class-room, 265;

mulative, 232; triumph of scientific truth, 232, 233, sketch by Professor Baynes, 265,266; remini.
Germany, Reconstruction of, 133; the battle of scences by Dr. Cairns, 266; work of the class,

Sadowa, and its results, ib. ; exceptional position 266,267; courtesy to his students, and the gener-
of Germany amongst her neighbours from the al effect and value of his teaching, 267; influence
first dawn of her history, 133, 134 ; the French of his writings in America--passage from a pa-
Revolution, 134; history of the Confederation per by Professor Porter, 268; his edition of
of the Rbine, 135; its contract with France, Reid's Works, ib.; honours conferred on him
ib. ; the battle of Jena, ib. ; the history of from abroad, ib.; small recognition of his claims
Prussia between 1807 and 1813 the turning in his own country, 269; struck by paralysis in
point in the history of Germany, 135, 136; 1844, ib.; the pension, 270 ; Sir William in his
the war of liberation, ib.; Prussia and Aus- latter days, 270,271; his edition of Dugald Stew-
tria, 136,137; Prussia at the Vienna Congress, art's Works, 271 ; unfinished literary labours,
187; King Frederick-William 111., 138; neither 271,272; last years, illness, and death, 272.
freedom nor union for Germany gained at Vienna, Holberg, Ludvig,--the father of modern Danish
ib.; Baron von Stein, ib. ; Act of the Germanic literature, 233; no national literature before him,
Confederation, 139,-its distinctive character, ib.; 233,234 ; parentage, 234; visit to Holland, ib. ;
the Frankfort Diet, 139,140; policies of Austria visits England, and studies at Oxford, 234,235 ;
and Prussia subsequent to the Final Act of 1820, returns to Copenhagen and lectures on his trav-
14N; Germany's political professors, 140,141; the els, 235 ; publishes his first work, ib.; his visit to
“Staatenbund," 141, and the “Bundesstaat," ib.; Rome, and return to Copenhagen, where he is
the discussions of 1848-49 in the Frankfort Par- appointed Professor of Latin and Rhetoric, 236;
liament, 142; the crown of Germany offered to period of literary activity, 236, 237; his illness
the King of Prussia, but declined, 143,144 ; the and death, 237,238 ; his simple mode of life, 238;
new Confederacy proposed by Prussia, 144 ; Aus- distinctive features of his genius, ib. ; his desire to
tria summons the Diet to meet at Frankfurt, ib.; found a national literature, 239; his strength as a
the subsequent conflict, 145, 146; the Italian war moralist, and his weakness, 239,240; his influence
gives the signal for the resuscitation of the Ger- on the language, 240, 241; his three principal
man question, 146; the campaign of 1869, 147; works~"Peder Paars, 241; “Niels Klim,"
the attitude of the several governments interested 242, and the Comedies, 243; comparison between
in the solution of the German question, 147,148; Holberg and Molière, 244; translations, from one
incidents of the political campaign between the of his comedies, “Erasmus Montanus," 244,249 ;
Great Germans and the Little Germans, 148, 149; charges brought against his comedies, 249,250;
the programme of reform issued by the Wurz- the “ Epistles," 250; influence of his works on
burg Coalition, 149; replies of Austria and Prus- the minds of his coutemporarics, 250,251.
sia, 150; formation of the Bismarck ministry at Hudson's Bay Company, The: origin, history, and
Berlin, 150,151, and the legacies bequeathed to present condition of the Red River Settlement, 83,
him by his predecessors, 161,152; the two lines 84; Sebastian Cabot-Henry Hudson--Prince Ru-
of policy taken up by him, 182; aspect of the con- pert, 84; nature of the Company's title, 84, 85;
flict with the Würzburg Coalition at this time, Parliament petitioned in 1690, by the traders, 85 ;
153; eventful conversation between Bismarck the Company's failure, 86; the first legislative in-
and the Austrian Minister at Berlin, 153,154 ; in- quiry into its affairs, ib.; the North-West Fur Com-
terview between the Emperor of Austria and the pany, 87; rivalry and warfare between the Con-
King of Prussia, 154; a Congress of Sovereigns panies, and their subsequent amalgamation, ib.;
'proposed shortly afterwards by Austria, ib., de- the Charter of the Company denounced as illegal
clined by Prussia, ib.; the Austrian programme, -opinion of counsel as to its validity, ib. ; Lord
155,156; reply of the Prussian cabinet, 157; in- Brougham's opinion, 88; Right Hon. Edward
dependent action of the two great Powers, 158; Ellice, ib.; misgovernment of Red River Settle
the controversy interrupted by the death of the ment, and grievances of the settlers, 88, 89; the
King of Denmark, ib.; subsequent events till the Hudson's Bay dispute, 90; the Company's preten-
battle of Sadowa, ib. ; reconstructed Germany, sions, ib. ; the portion of territory styled the
158,160; examination of the North German Con- Fertile Belt, ib.; the character of the country
stitution, 162,166.

misrepresented by the Company's officials, ib. seq.;

Sir George Simpson's paradox, 91; expeditions to
HANILTON, Sir William,--Memoir of, 251; birth and explore the country, 91, 92; route to the Rocky

parentage, 252 ; early studies, 263; at Glasgow Mountains, 92; testimony of the independent ex-
and Oxford Universities, 253, 254; intimate plorers, Lord Milton and Dr. Cheadle, ib.; change
friends, 254 ; Mr. Christie's Oxford reminiscences, of opinion indicated in the Company's last pros-
254, 255; additional particulars by Mr. Traill, 255, pectus, 98; the Company and tlie StockEx-
256; final examination for his degree at Oxford, change, ib.; agitation in the Dominion of Canada
256, studies for the Scottish Bar, and passes as as to the acquisition of the Company's territory,
advocate, ib.; adjudged heir-male to Sir Robert 94; Canadian forests, ib.; definition of the foot.
Hamilton of Preston, ib. ; the patrimonial estate, ing on which the Company was to stand in rela-
ib. ; notice of his ancestors, ib.; career at the Bar, tion to the Dominion, 95 ; Mr. Gladstone's propo-
257; lis merits unrecognised, 257,258 ; life in sitions, 95, 96; the “Rupert's Land Act, 1868,"
Edinburgh, 1813 to 1820--anecdote of this period 96 ; Colonial administration, 96, 97; desirability
given by Professor Baynes, 258,259; candidature i of extinguishing the claims of the Company by

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