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CONTENTS.

This Table of Contents, and the copious Index to the volume, wors
obligingly prepared by the Rev. G. F. WRIGHT, of Andover,

ARTICLE I.

THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION.

PAOR

Views and Definitions of Species.—How Darwin's differs from that

of Agassiz, and from the Common View.-Variation, its Causes
unknown.—Darwin's Genealogical Tree.-Darwin and Agassiz
agree in the Capital Facts.—Embryology.-Physical Connec-
tion of Species compatible with Intellectual Connection. How
to prove Transmutation.-Known Extent of Variation.-Cause
of Likeness unknown.- Artificial Selection.-Reversion.-In.
terbreeding.–Natural Selection.--Classification tentative.-
What Darwin assumes.-Argument stated.-How Natural Se-
lection works.- Where the Argument is weakest.–Objections.
-Morphology and Teleology harmonized.—Theory not athe-
istical.--Conceivable Modes of Relation of God to Nature

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ARTICLE II.

DESIGN versus NECESSITY-A DISCUSSION.

How Design in Nature can be shown.--Design not inconsistent

with Indirect Attainment

62

Part III.-Theories contrasted. -Early Arguments against Darwin-

ism.-Philosophical and Theological Objections.-Theory may

be theistic.--Final Cause not excluded.--Cause of Variation

unknown.-Three Views of Efficient Cause compatible with

Theism.—Agassiz's Objections of a Philosophical Nature.-

Minor Ohjections.--Conclusion

. 129

ARTICLE IV.

SPECIES AS TO VARIATION, GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION, AND SUCCESSION.

Alphonse De Candolle's Study of the Oak Genus.—Variability of

the Species.-Antiquity.--A Common Origin probable.-Dr.
Falconer on the Common Origin of Elephants.—Variation and
Natural Selection distinguished.-Saporta on the Gradation be-
tween the Vegetable Forms of the Cretaceous and the Tertiary.

-Hypothesis of Derivation more likely to be favored by Bot-

anists than by Zoologists.--Views of Agassiz respecting the

Origin, Dispersion, Variation, Characteristics, and Successive

Creation of Species contrasted with those of De Candolle and

others.-Definition of Species.—Whether its Essence is in the

Likeness or in the Genealogical Connection of the individuals

composing a Species

· 178
EVOLUTION AND THEOLOGY.

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Writings of Henslow, Hodges, and Le Conte examined.-Evolu-

tion and Design compatible.—The Admission of a System of

Nature, with Fixed Laws, concedes in Principle all that the

Doctrine of Evolution requires.—Hypotheses, Probabilities,

and Surmises, not to be decried by Theologians, who use them,

perhaps, more freely and loosely than Naturalists.—Theolo-

gians risk too much in the Defense of Untenable Outposts 252

.

ARTICLE VIII.

"

WHAT IS DARWINISM ?"

Dr. Hodge's Book with this Title criticised.—He declares that Dar.

winism is Atheism, yet its Founder a Theist.—Darwinism

Part II.—Do Species wear out, and, if not, why not?-Implication

of the Darwinian Theory that Species are unlimited in Exist-
ence.--Examination of an Opposite Doctrine maintained by
Naudin.-Evidence that Species may die out from Inherent
Causes only indirect and inferential from Arrangements to
secure Wide Breeding.-Physiological Import of Sexes.-
Doubtful whether Sexual Reproduction with Wide Breeding
is a Preventive or only a Palliative of Decrepitude in Species.
-Darwinian Hypothesis must suppose the Former

847

.

The Opposition between Morphology and Teleology reconciled by

Darwinism, and the Latter reinstated.---Character of the New
Teleology.-Purpose and Design distinguished.—Man has no
Monopoly of the Latter.-Inference of Design from Adap-
tation and Utility legitimate; also in Hume's Opinion irresisti-
ble.—The Principle of Design, taken with Specific Creation,
totally insufficient and largely inapplicable; but, taken with
the Doctrine of the Evolution of Species in Nature, applicable,
pertinent, and, moreover, necessary.--Illustratiors from Abor.
tive Organs, supposed Waste of Being, etc.—All Nature being
of a Piece, Design must either pervade or be absent from the
Whole.--Its Absence not to be inferred because the Events
take place in Nature.—Illustration of the Nature and Prov-
ince of Natural Selection.-It picks out, but does not origi.

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