The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell: Volume 3, 1874-1879

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Cambridge University Press, 1990 - Всего страниц: 960
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This is a comprehensive edition of Maxwell's manuscript papers published virtually complete and largely for the first time.

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Содержание

VI
1
VII
31
VIII
381
XI
383
XIII
384
XV
387
XVII
391
XVIII
392
LXI
460
LXII
461
LXIII
462
LXIV
463
LXV
580
LXVI
582
LXVII
588
LXVIII
589

XIX
394
XX
395
XXIII
398
XXIV
400
XXVII
401
XXIX
408
XXXI
412
XXXIII
414
XXXIV
417
XXXV
419
XXXVI
421
XXXVII
425
XXXIX
431
XL
433
XLIII
435
XLIV
436
XLV
439
XLVIII
441
XLIX
444
L
446
LI
448
LII
449
LV
450
LVIII
452
LIX
454
LXX
596
LXXII
606
LXXIII
609
LXXIV
611
LXXV
613
LXXVI
614
LXXIX
642
LXXXI
644
LXXXIII
645
LXXXIV
646
LXXXV
647
LXXXVI
648
LXXXVII
649
LXXXVIII
663
XCI
665
XCII
670
XCIII
671
XCIV
674
XCVII
677
XCVIII
681
XCIX
858
C
902
CI
911
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Об авторе (1990)

James Maxwell was a British physicist who developed a standard theoretical model for the modern understanding of electricity and magnetism. He showed that these two phenomena are two aspects of the same field and as a result he unified and systematized a vast field of research. Maxwell took many diverse observations and qualitative concepts developed by Michael Faraday and others, formulating them into a unified theory between 1864 and 1873. On the basis of this theory, Maxwell predicted that electromagnetic waves should exist and travel with the speed of light, and he identified light as a form of electromagnetic radiation. Both of these predictions were experimentally confirmed. Maxwell's other great contribution to physics was formulating a mathematical basis for the kinetic theory of gases. Using a statistical approach, he related the velocity of the molecules in a gas to its temperature, showing that heat results from the motion of molecules. Maxwell's result had been conjectured for some time, but it had never been supported experimentally. Maxwell then expanded his research to study viscosity, diffusion, and other properties of gases. Maxwell also provided the first satisfactory explanation of Saturn's rings. He established on theoretical grounds that the rings are not solid but rather composed of many small, fragmented objects that orbit Saturn.

P. M. HARMAN is Professor of the History of Science at Lancaster University.

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