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fortune, not mine. He should have had it immediately reprinted. I am informed that it could have been done in less than half a day, and at an expense of only four dollars. Surely the rich. State of New York could have afforded that amount. A great deal more might be said upon this subject, but the above is quite sufficient to show that it is not my fault that this difficulty has arisen.

In this case I do not desire that the law of publication should be harshly administered, but I insist that the circumstances are such that it should be strictly carried out. Prof. Hall's pamphlet was not regularly published, according to the strict meaning of the law, and as it is altogether his fault, and not mine, the consequences should fall upon him and not upon me. In the common law, when a loss has accrued, which must be sustained by one out of two individuals, it falls upon the one by whose misconduct or neglect of duty it has been occasioned. The same rule holds good in scientific matters, as well as in the ordinary affairs of every-day life. I bestowed a great deal of investigation. on my genus, and no doubt Prof. Hall did the same upon his. As matters have turned out, either his work or mine must be lost. On whom must the loss fall? On the party who is to blame, or or on the party who is not to blame? I do not ask to have the law stretched or executed leniently in my favor. I require no such extension in order to obtain justice. I only desire that it should be strictly adhered to, and not distorted in order to favour the party who has been the cause of all this difficulty.

METEOROLOGICAL

BY CHARLES SMALLWOOD, M.D., LL.D., D.C.L.,

Professor of Meteorology in the University McGill College, Montreal.

The following observations extend over the past year, 1871, and are reduced from the records of the Montreal Observatory, Lat. 45o 36m 17.41s Long. 4h 54m 17s west of Greenwich. The cisterns of the Barometer ar: 182 feet above mean sea level. The whole of the readings are corrected for any instrumental errors, and the observations of the Barometer are corrected and reduced to 320 F.

Atmospheric pressure. The highest reading of the Barometer occurred at 10h 30m p.m., on the 25th day of January, and indicated 30,985 inches; the lowest reading was at 2h 25m p.m., on the 18th day of February, and was 29,050 inches, giving a range during the year of 1.935 inches.

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RESULTS FOR MONTREAL FOR THE YEAR 1871.

The following table has been compiled to show the highest and lowest readings, also the monthly mean and monthly range in inches and decimals of an inch:

September

October

November
December

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Temperature of the Air F.-The highest reading of the Thermometer during the year was on the 13th July and was 95°. The lowest was on the 5th February and was 28° (below zero), giving a yearly range or climatic difference of 123°. The mean temperature for the year was 44.53, which is 2.23 degrees higher than the Isothem for Montreal deduced from observations extending over a long series of years.

The first frost of autumn occurred on the 8th September.

The warmest month during the year was the month of July, and the coldest February. The mean temperature of the warmest day was 81.70 on the 13th July, and the mean temperature of the coldest day was 13.73 (below zero) on the 5th February.

The following table shows the monthly mean temperature for 1871, with the amount of rain and snow; the snow in this case is not reduced by melting into water, but is the observed depth in inches on the surface:

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Spring Quarter.

44 41

58°59

67°52

76°58

70967

57°00

50°50

31°60

18050

Months.

Winter Quarter. January.

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February.

Quarterly mean.

March

April

May.

December..

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46°1

46°2

6196

6800

9425

9282

9500

8996

Quarterly mean.

9190

8390

5293

46°0

The following table shows the quarterly mean temperature, also the amount of rain and snow in inches for each quarter:

Quarterly mean...

September.

Autumn Quarter. October ..

November.

- 2608

2890

1700

2791

54°1

5607

3594

2907

6c6

- 2299

Mean Temp.

24035

11904

18070

18°03

35025

44°41

58°59

46°08

67952

70958

70067

3694

4501

69°59

57°00

50°50

31°60

46°36

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There were three cold terms during the year, one in January, the second in February, and the third in December.

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The first was somewhat remarkable for its duration and severity. The temperature was 101 and 20 below zero, and it attained a minimum of 26°8, and the Barometer attained a maximum of 30.985 inches.

The following table will show the variations in temperature and its duration :

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The second cold term occurred on the 4th of February and attained a temperature of -28°. The Thermometer was 52h 45m below zero.

The following table contains a record of the observations:

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VOL. VI.

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The third cold term of the 21st December set in with somewhat unusual rapidity. The early part of the evening was bright and moonlight, with but light wind from the N. W. The Thermometer attained its zero point at 8.5 p.m. and at 9 p.m. stood at -1°6. Wind N. W.; velocity 4 miles per hour. Barometer 29.632. At midnight the wind freshened and veered to the W., velocity 12 miles per hour, the Barometer slowly rising, and at 11.19 p.m. (one of the signal hours of the War Department at Washington) it stood at -5°5; at 2 a.m. it stood at -10°6; and from that time it fell rapidly and attained a minimum of -2299. The Thermometer was 34h below zero.

No. 3.

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