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reth, the Government Secretary, the sanction of the government to celebrate marriages among the slave population. Some time after this, he was induced, at the request of the authorities at Nevis, to refrain from landing there on his return from England, as the slaves of the island imagined, from the earnest efforts which he had made on their behalf, that he had brought the announcement of their freedom with him from England; and it was feared that the presence of their kind and zealous pastor and friend might be the signal for a rising among the negroes.

The following is a copy of Lord Bathurst's letter in 1817, to Governor Probyn, respecting the right of slaves to marry :—

"Downing-street, 11th June, 1817.

"SIR,-I have received your letter of the 29th April, in reply to my despatch of the 6th February, in which I enclosed the complaint of the Rev. Mr. Davis respecting impediments alleged to have been opposed to his marrying a slave in the island of Nevis.

"I am new to acquaint you, that a similar question having arisen in the Bahamas, and it having been referred to his Majesty's law-officers, they have reported it to be their opinion that the ecclesiastical law has always held, without distinction as to the consent of the owners, that slaves were not to be excluded from marriage, either with free persons or slaves, and that their owners' claims to their services would not be affected thereby.

"I am desirous of calling your attention particularly to the opinion above adverted to, in order that you may take the necessary steps for removing the error which appears generally to prevail at Nevis, with respect to the disability of slaves to contract marriage, even with the consent of their owners; an error which is the more dangerous, as it tends to perpetuate that promiscuous intercourse amongst slaves which is fatal to all attempts at moral and religious improvement.

"I have the honour to be, Sir,

"Yours, &c.,

"(Signed) BATHURST." After having held the rectory of St. Paul's, Nevis, for eleven years, Mr. Davis removed to St. George's, Basseterre, St. Christopher's, where he laboured for about fourteen years, winning such general love and respect, that to this day he is remembered with the most reverent fondness by all at that place who are of an age to recollect his services. In the various schools of his parish, at the time of his leaving, there were about 1,300 children. Whilst at Basseterre, he became one of Bishop Coleriged's rural deans. The Right Rev. Dr. W. H. Coleridge was at that time Bishop of Barbados. He resigned the bishopric in 1841, and arrived in England during that year. In 1848 he became the first Warden of St. Augustine's College, Canterbury, where he died much lamented on the 20th of December, 1849.

From St. Christopher's Mr. Davis removed to Antigua, and was appointed in 1837 Archdeacon of Antigua. In 1842 he visited England, and was selected as the bishop of the diocese in which he had so assiduously filled the office of archdeacon. He was consecrated in Westminster Abbey

on the 24th August, St. Bartholomew's Day, 1842, with four other colonial prelates These were the Ven. Thos. Parry, D.D. late Archdeacon, now Bishop, of Barbade; the Ven. W. P. Austin, D.D., late Arti deacon, now Bishop, of Guiana; Dr. F. R Nixon, Bishop of Tasmania; and Dr. Ge Tomlinson, Bishop of Gibraltar. The prelate who had for upwards of sevente years superintended the affairs of the Church in the see of Barbados, preached, his own impressive manner, on the solar and remarkable occasion. The consecrate of five colonial bishops on that day. m Westminster Abbey, was a memorable event in the history of the Church.

Dr. Davis proved himself an active, ener getic bishop, anxious to fulfil in a gentle and kindly spirit the important duties of as sacred office. He had a natural cheerfa ness of disposition and manner, which mingled well with that benign gravity se becoming in a chief pastor of the Church With a lofty form and dignified bearing, was very humble in his demeanour in the performance of duties in his Divine Master's service:

"Affectionate in look, as well becomes

The messenger of grace to guilty men." If there was one of the episcopal func tions in the discharge of which the Bistr of Antigua took a greater interest th another, in the islands committed to spiritual care, it was the rite of Confirmation, the fitting link between the Sacraments of Baptism and the Holy Communion. was his custom to keep exact records of the several series of confirmations held by him from the period of the constitution of the diocese, and to communicate statistics and interesting particulars of these to the Sonc for Promoting Christian Knowledge, as we as to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. In the seven series he confirmed 9,549 persons. His letters to the Rev. T. B. Murray, Secretary of the former Society, contained, from time to time, accounts of the visits which he had paid, often in roa weather, and under arduous circumstances to the several islands comprised in his cese; the object and effect of these eas copal visits having been to provide me effectually amongst the inhabitants the means of public instruction and worstIn the exertions which he made for the erection of new churches, the establishment of schools, and the supply of pastoral ass<ance, he thought no trouble too great. The islands included in the diocese are numerous. these are Antigua, Montserrat, Barbui, St. Christopher, Nevis, Anguilia, the Virga Islands, and Dominica.

Appended to the Bishop's second Triennial Charge to his clergy, in the summer of 1850, is a pleasing little poem, entitied "The Bishop's Blessing; or, The First Cuis firmation at Madeira." A note at t.e conclusion of the Charge explains the sch ject of the verses. It appears that Contr mation, according to the rites of the Chur h of England, was administered for the first

1857.]

Sir Jas. Boswell, Bart.-Rev. Philip Bliss, D.C.L.

time in the Island of Madeira by the Bishop of Antigua, on Thursday in Passion-week, April 11th, 1843, on his way from England to his diocese, after his consecration. On that day an interesting girl, in the last stage of consumption, was borne to the church on a couch, just before the service began, and placed by her two brothers before the bishop at the communion rails, to receive the holy rite with other candidates. After the Confirmation she was taken from the spot which she had occupied, and again so placed by her brothers as to be able to hear the bishop's charge. On the Easter-day following she received the holy Communion, and on Ascension-day she departed this life, to be with her Lord. Her mortal remains repose in the burial-ground of the English church of Funchal, Madeira. The following stanzas towards the end afford a good specimen of these affecting lines:—

"Of rude grey stone, a simple cross,
With legend brief display'd,
TALITHA CUMI! guards the moss
That wraps the slumbering maid.
"O holiest, loftiest privilege!

Rapt to her Lord away,

In all the brightness, all the pledge
Of His ascension-day.

"All blest and lovely be the bed

Whence, when an angel's wing
Shall sweep the dwellings of the dead,
An angel too shall spring!"

The bishop has left a widow and five children to mourn their loss. His three sons followed him to the grave. He was interred on Saturday, October 31st, in the cemetery at Kensal Green. The Bishop of Jamaica, Sir Robert Horsford, late Chief Justice of Antigua, J. W. Sheriff, Esq., AttorneyGeneral of Antigua, R. J. Mackintosh, Esq., the late Governor of the island, and Robert Young, Esq., a relative of the family, were present, with other friends, as mourners, at the funeral of the lamented pre'ate. His friend, the Rev. T. B. Murray, M.A., read the Burial Service over the remains.

M.

SIR JAS. BOSWELL, BART. Nov. 4. At his seat in Scotland, aged 50, Sir James Boswell, Bart., of Auchinleckhouse, county Argyll.

Sir James was the only son of Sir Alexander Boswell, who in his turn was the only son of James Boswell, the friend and biographer of Johnson, by his cousin Margaret, daughter of David Montgomery, Esq., of Landishaw, N. B. Sir Alexander was raised to the baronetage in 1821. As is well known, he lost his life in a duel in the following year; and as the baronet so recently deceased has left no male issue by his wife, Jessie Jane, daughter of Sir James Montgomery Cunninghame, Bart., the Boswell title has become extinct. Two daughters, Julia and Emily, we believe, survive to lament their loss. The deceased baronet was for many years an active magistrate and deputy-lieutenant for his native county of Argyll.

677

REV. PHILIP BLISS, D.C. L., F.S.A. Nov. 18. At his lodgings, St. Mary Hall, Oxford, the Rev. Philip Bliss, D.C.L., aged 69.

The deceased was the son of the Rev. Philip Bliss, formerly of Oriel College, Oxford, and who held the livings of Dodington and Frampton-Cotterell, in the county of Gloucester. Dr. Bliss was born at Chippig-Sodbury, in the same county, and received his early education, first at the Grammar-school in that town, under the Rev. Edward Davies, well known as the author of "Celtic Researches" and other works. From thence he was sent to Merchant Taylors' School, where he continued from 1797 to 1806, in which year he went to St. John's College, Oxford, as a Scholar, He became a Fellow of that society in 1809, and succeeded to a Law-fellowship in 1811, on the death of Dr. Saunders. In 1809 he published a new edition of "Earle's Microcosmography." 8vo., for which work we believe he had collected large materials for another and an improved edition at the ti ne of his decease. This work was followed by the publication, for the first time, of "Aubrey's Lives of Eminent Men," transcribed from the original MSS. in the Ashmolean Museum, and which were subjoined to, and form a portion of, the work better known as "Letters from the Bodleian," 3 vols. 8vo., London, 1813, which letters were selected by another hand. In the same year he also printed, conjointly with a friend, a limited number (104 copies) of a thin 4to. volume-"Bibliographical Miscellanies," which is now rare, and not easily obtained. But the work by which he is best known to the literary world, is his edition of Wood's Athena Oxoniensis, "Lives of Eminent Men, Educated in, and Annals of, the University of Oxford," 4 vols. 4to., which appeared between the years 1814 and 1820.

This very valuable republication owed its origin to a conversation Dr. Bliss had in Oxford with the late Thomas Park, of Hampstead, in the course of which he named to Mr. Park the many MS. additions he had made to his copy of the Athena Oxoniensis. Mr. Park named the matter to an enterprising publishing firm in London, suggesting at the same time a new edition, to be edited by Dr. Bliss; the work was undertaken, and admirably accomplished, the editor receiving £2 2s. per sheet for his labours.

Dr. Bliss took his degree of B.C.L. in 1815, Deacon's orders in 1817, and Priest's orders in 1818, proceeding to his D. C.L. in 1820. He first held the curacy of Newington, in Oxfordshire, which he retained until the death of the rector, (Dr. Pett). From that time, until affected with paralysis in 1855, he officiated at Studley Priory, which charge was given him by his friend the late Sir Alexander Croke. Whilst an Oxford undergraduate, he performed the duties of one of the assistants in the Bodleian Library. Subsequently, through the interest of Earl Spencer, he obtained a position in the British Museum as an

[graphic]

The public duties which occupied Dr. him.
Bliss during a long series of years, almost
excluded that devotion to literary labour of Oxford,
which he so much loved. It remains for us,
therefore, only to enumerate a few other
publications for which we are indebted to his
editorial care. He republished two old plays,

"The Inconstant Lady, 1614," and "The
Christmas Prince, as acted before the Univer-
sity of Oxford, in 1607," both in 4to., 1814
and 1816. In 1841 he edited a new edition
of "Henshawe's Meditations," 12mo., which
we believe is still to be obtained. In 1846
he presented to the members of the Rox-
burgh Club a volume of historical papers,
printed from collections in his own library.
In 1848, Dr. Bliss edited, for the Ecclesiasti-
cal History Society, "The Life of Ant. à
Wood," which was intended to have formed
the first volume of a new edition of the Athena.
In the notes to this volume will be found much
interesting matter relative to old Oxford.
The work was not proceeded with, the so-
ciety proving a failure, through the mis-
management of parties connected with and
originating the scheme. Dr. Bliss has, how-
ever, done enough in this volume to shew
how valuable a new edition of the Athena
would have been, if issued under his revision.
"The Catalogue of Oxford Graduates from
1659 to 1850," prepared by Dr. Bliss, and
printed at the University Press in 1851, is a
work involving much labour, and possessing
great accuracy. But the history of the last
work to which his name is appended may
be considered as one of the most curious and
interesting of his literary labours;-we allude
to" Reliquia Heurniana; Extracts from the
Diaries of Thomas Hearne," 2 vols. 8vo.,
1857. This work was commenced, and be-
tween 500 and 600 pages were printed, more
than forty years before; but, owing to his
various engagements, Dr. Bliss was unable
to devote the time and labour requisite to
its completion until the summer of 1856,
when he again took the work in hand, and
it was issued from the press at the close of
that year. One hundred and fifty copies of
this curious and entertaining work were
printed on small, and fifty copies on large
paper; and of these, the whole impression

ocess as a physician at Virgen
of Dublin. His mother was

James Weir Hogg, late
East India Company

Beverley and H

John N

on the

re

distinguished

by the literary world

those who shared

His uniform affability
habits, rendered him peculiarly-
manner, combined with his
fied for the important office of Regist
the University, which he so long t
proportion of whom will lament his s
the satisfaction of all its members, a ac
that of a kind personal friend.

THE REV. GEORGE RAWLINSON.

Sept. 23. "We regret to announce

death of the Rev. George Rawlinson, Pris
sor of Applied Sciences in the Elphinst
Institution, which took place early on t
23rd instant, from abscess of the liver.
Rawlinson had not been long in India, hav
only arrived in Bombay about ten months
but during his short sojourn among us be
excellent qualities endeared him to all the
of Mr. Rawlinson were interred on Thursda
who made his acquaintance. The remai
evening, and were followed to the grave
numerous circle of his friends and admirers

Bombay Times. Such are the terms a
which the "Bombay Times" announced
relatives and friends.
event which has shocked a large circle

The subject of that notice is the only s
of George Rawlinson, Esq., formerly of D
y Graig near Bridgend, Glamorganshers
January, 1828, and was educated at Chester,
but now of Kurrachee. He was born 5th d
under the Rev. R. W. Gleadowe, (formerly
Head Master of the King's School,
College. While at King's College he was a
Vicar of Neston,) and afterwards at King')
Jelf, appointed by Lord Palmerston to se
the recommendation of his warm friend Dr.
dents, whose regard for him was manifested
perintend the studies of some Egyptian st
in a most gratifying manner as he passed
King's College he proceeded to Cambridge,
through Egypt on his way to Bombay. From
where he entered Emmanuel College; here

ned one

-Rev. Philip Bhs, DCL OF

'he close of the war, he took
the 1st Madras European
he most gallant and dis-
s belonging to the ser-
characterized by Sir
speech at Glasgow

be recent mutiny,
th his regiment,
→ssed on with
the capture
rs will not
matter of
', whom

gre

***** eius to associate

without any harm to himself, Christian and gentlemanly beha greatly to raise the tone of the which he was."

shing
foor

of

At Christmas, 1854, he was orda. the curacy of St. Mary's, Vincent-sq and the best testimony to his conduct dur. the two short years he remained there, were the tears for his loss shed by the poor whom

saved yourselves and your comrades!' We did not lose a man in the charge, though it was thought by other corps to be a mad attempt. As we started to charge, the last round of grapeshot went immediately over the heads of our small band of men; but in their haste to fire the enemy lost their elevation, so we thus escaped. Private M'Grath and myself were struck in the action, but only bruised, the shot having first hit the ground. M'Grath received five balls on different parts of his body, so he had to fall to the rear. I was merely struck on the hip-bone with only one ball, therefore I ran on, not heeding it. Mr. Crowe and Campbell thought I was killed, until I jumped up and ran after my comrades."

The full particulars of his death have not, of course, been received; but we believe that he was discovered in his tent ill of his mortal sickness on the morning of the 16th, d that he died after a four hours' illness. the 14th, two days previously, he had n home a long and interesting letter, an account of the action of the 12th, the above extract, and narrating horrible scenes he had witnessed e. Mrs. Campbell and family, d, are at St. Andrew's, where ung bereaved children will sympathy,

+

he had visited, when the intelligence of his bur

death was received.

In the autumn of last year he was appointed to the Professorship of Applied Sciences at the Elphinstone College, Bombay. He only arrived there at Christmas last, but devoted himself with such energy to the field of usefulness which he saw open before him, that, finding the students without proper class-books, he at once set about supplying the deficiency, and had prepared one on Dynamics, which was printed and in use at the time of his decease. A second was in type, and four others were in active preparation. When we add that he was making rapid progress both in the Hindustani and Mahratta languages, with the view to a more efficient discharge of the duties of his office, his death may well be regarded as a great loss to the important cause of education in India.

foreign

ON, LATE M.P. FOR
t, Basildon Park,
James Morrison,
Morrison, Dillon,
don, and for-
⚫the borough

one or tw well illustrate Dining one day for his consi long before the Mirz claimed, with a little impart bottle, Mirza-what do you ca the man that stops the wine?" him Mohammed," said the Mir quiet smile. The same person warm King disputing with the Mirza about the E lence of his cook, of whose fame he very jealous, and wound up with " ought to know something about fire? "Well," said the Mirza, "he may have been forty years before the fire, but he is

On leaving Vincent-square, he contributed a painted glass window to the east end of the church as a memorial of his first ministry. That window is now a memorial of his early and lamented death. He has left a widow, a daughter of William J. Thoms, Esq., F.S.A., to whom he was married only a few weeks before he left England.

PROFESSOR MIRZA IBRAHIM. July. We have to record the death of Mirza Mohammed Ibrahím at Teheran, in July last. Mirza Ibrahim was a Persian gentleman, who, having for fifteen years been professor of his native language at Haileybury, retired in 1844, on a pension, from the East India Company, to spend the remainder of his days in his own land, having previously married a Dutch lady. The Mirza will be regretted by a large circle of literary and distinguished friends in this country. Few foreigners ever mas

for he has been forty years before the

raw yet.'

nts,

born

otch de

metro

A colleague, who was rather

celebrated for his good appetite,

one day

oun

told the Mirza he meant to dine on soup of fish. "Indeed," was the reply, "it is t often you make a superficial dinner." We could record many other facetiæ, which, had they been uttered by a Chief Justice, would have been immortalized in Campbell's Lives, but enough has been said to shew that Mohammed Ibrahim was a man of abilities beyond the common herd.-Homeward Mail.

BRIGADIER GENERAL NICHOLSON.

Sept. 21. Of wounds received before the walls of Delhi, aged 34, General John Nicholson, of the 34th Bengal Native Infantry.

General John Nicholson was an officer of no ordinary experience and promise. At the time of his decease he was in command of the Punjab division. He was the eldest son of the late Dr. Alexander Nicholson, who owned a small landed property in the county of Down, and who died a few years since, having practised with considerable

Assistant-Librarian; but this he held for a very short time, and then returned to Oxford. From the years 1822 to 1828 he filled the office of Under-Librarian in the Bodleian Library; in 1824 he was appointed Registrar of the University, in the room of the Rev. John Gutch, and soon after, in 1826, Keeper of the Archives. The Registrarship he resigned in 1853, and was succeeded in it by Mr. (now Dr.) Rowden. He continued to fill the office of Keeper of the Archives until the period of his decease, though only a few days before that lamented event, the Rev. John Griffiths, of Wadham College, was chosen by the University to assist him, in consequence of his increasing infirmities. He was ap pointed Principal of St. Mary Hall in the year 1848, to which he was presented by the then Chancellor, the late Duke of Wellington.

The public duties which occupied Dr. Bliss during a long series of years, almost excluded that devotion to literary labour which he so much loved. It remains for us, therefore, only to enumerate a few other publications for which we are indebted to his editorial care. He republished two old plays,

"The Inconstant Lady, 1614," and "The Christmas Prince, as acted before the University of Oxford, in 1607," both in 4to., 1814 and 1816. In 1841 he edited a new edition of "Henshawe's Meditations," 12mo., which we believe is still to be obtained. In 1816 he presented to the members of the Roxburgh Club a volume of historical papers, printed from collections in his own library. In 1848, Dr. Bliss edited, for the Ecclesiastical History Society, "The Life of Ant. à Wood," which was intended to have formed the first volume of a new edition of the Athena. In the notes to this volume will be found much

interesting matter relative to old Oxford. The work was not proceeded with, the society proving a failure, through the mismanagement of parties connected with and originating the scheme. Dr. Bliss has, however, done enough in this volume to shew how valuable a new edition of the Athenæ would have been, if issued under his revision. "The Catalogue of Oxford Graduates from 1659 to 1850," pr pared by Dr. Bliss, and printed at the University Press in 1851, is a work involving much labour, and possessing great accuracy. But the history of the last work to which his name is appended may be considered as one of the most curious and interesting of his literary labours;—we allude to" Reliquia Hearniane; Extracts from the Diaries of Thomas Hearne," 2 vols. 8vo., 1857. This work was commenced, and between 500 and 600 pages were printed, more than forty years before; but, owing to his various engagements, Dr. Bliss was unable to devote the time and labour requisite to its completion until the summer of 1856, when he again took the work in hand, and it was issued from the press at the close of that year. One hundred and fifty copies of this curious and entertaining work were printed on small, and fifty copies on large paper; and of these, the whole impression

was sold in the course Bartholomew's Day, 2-prelates day of publication. Dr. B mere collector of books; he knew th tents, and understood all those points wi render them valuable, not merely to bibliographer, but also to the student. library is singularly rich in all departm of English literature, especially in that the olden time; and he has noted in m of his literary treasures those peculiari which render them most valuable to book-collector, and which might have pas unnoticed under a less observant eye.

Dr. Bliss was married in 1825 to Sopl daughter of the late Rev. Mr. Bell, v survives him to deplore his loss. In addit to the offices we have named, he was at time of his decease a Clerk of the May and also one of the Delegates of th versity Press, an office for which his ledge and acquirements eminently him. Though not unexpected, will be deeply regretted by the vers of Oxford, of which he had so I been distinguished member and onent, by those who shared his private endship, 21 by the literary world at larg,

His uniform affability ad cordiality f manner, combined with ais business-ke habits, rendered him pealiarly well que fied for the important fice of Registrar of the University, which ae so long file the satisfaction of al its members, a large proportion of whom will lament his loss as that of a kind personal friend.

THE REV. GEORGE RAWLINSON.

Sept. 23. "We regret to announce the death of the Rev. George Rawlinson, Profes sor of Applied Sciences in the Elphinstone Institution, which took place early on the 23rd instant, from abscess of the liver. Mr. Rawlinson had not been long in India, having only arrived in Bombay about ten months; but during his short sojourn among us his excellent qualities endeare i him to all the who made his acquaintance. The rema of Mr. Rawlinson were interred on Thursday evening, and were followed to the grave by a numerous circle of his friends and admirers

Bombay Times. Such are the terms which the "Bombay Times" announced a event which has shocked a large circle of

relatives and friends.

The subject of that notice is the only of George Rawlinson, Esq., formerly of Dea y Graig near Bridgend, Glamorganshire, but now of Kurrachee. He was born 5th of January, 1828, and was educated at Chester, under the Rev. R. W. Gleadowe, (formerly Head Mister of the King's School, Do Vicar of Neston,) and afterwards at King College. While at King's College he was the recommendation of his warm friend Dr. Jelf, appointed by Lord Palmerston to perintend the studies of some Egyptian dents, whose regard for him was manifested in a most gratif ing manner as he pe through Egypt on his way to Bombay, Fre King's College he proceeded to Canbride, where he entered Emmanuel College; here

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