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THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CHRONICLE

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE EDITORIAL

COMMITTEE OF THE ACADEMIC SENATE

WITH THE CO-OPERATION OF THE FOLLOWING EDITORS

Mr. LEONARD BACON
Mr. VICTOR H. HENDERSON

General Editor
University Record

THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CHRONICLE publishes contributed articles, the chief addresses of general interest delivered at the University from time to time by distinguished visitors, and also as many as possible of the public addresses delivered at home or abroad by members of the faculty. Papers upon all subjects are admitted to its pages, provided the manner of their presentation is such as arouses general rather than technical interest. Each number contains also the UNIVERSITY RECORD, which presents in brief the annals of the University for the quarteryear preceding each issue of the magazine.

Issued quarterly, in January, April, July, and October

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SINGLE COPIES, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS

Foreign postage, twenty cents a year additional

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The University of California Press, Berkeley

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS

BERKELEY

1916

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VOL. XVIII

APRIL, 1916

No. 2

ADDRESSES AT MEMORIAL SERVICES IN HONOR

OF DR. E. W. HILGARD, UNIVERSITY OF

CALIFORNIA, JANUARY 30, 1916

ADDRESS BY E. J. WICKSON
Professor of Horticulture, Emeritus

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We are assembled today not to mourn over a life that was long and good but to be thankful for it; not to be sad that such a life was an environment of our own but to be glad of it; not to stand in inexpressible wonder in what remote and glorious sphere such a life is now continuing, but to lay firmer hold upon that part of it which was the endowment of our own lives, of the lives of this institution, of the State and of the world. For, without yielding aught of the claim to transcendental glories, which both true reason and revelation place in the western horizon of such a life, we may doubt or forget the remoteness of its glorification. For myself it is impossible to think that Hilgard has really departed for a far country. To me he is still here, loving and revering his God, laboring for the good of his fellowmen, enjoying the companionship of his friends and his loved ones—still here, alert and tireless in work; full of strength and grace in thought and speech; cordial, considerate and delightful in associated effort. I still think of Hilgard as many of us have known him for decades and, in this undertaking to lead you in glad admiration and remembrance of him, I shall speak of him as I used to speak to him; for we lived together through times and conditions which made it necessary to discuss frankly, not only the fundamental reasons for positions assumed, but methods of thought, attitudes, forms of expression, ways to force and ways to win approval and support from a firmament of authority which sometimes frowned and from a constituency which sometimes scowled and swore.

Through all such storms of adversity Hilgard came in due time into the full sunshine of enthusiastic approval and support, by the truth and talent which were in him, by the work that was in him and by the beautiful light of love for his fellowmen which twinkled in his eye and shone, fullorbed, in his smile. As I ask you to remember and honor him, how can I think of him as now remote; how can I think of his earthly life as over when I see that it will always continue in the activities of this institution which will live to the last day of mankind. It is therefore only one phase of an entity which will endure, of which I speak to you and, if I can speak at all truly, that phase will appear to you unique; abounding in gladness of heart but unswerving in tenacity of purpose; unremitting in labor and never depressed or appalled by its requirements; full of learning, both old and new, and fruitful in accomplishments beyond the usual achievement of even those accounted among the most efficient of men.

A BIOGRAPHICAL OUTLINE

Eugene Woldemar Hilgard was born January 5, 1833, at Zweibrücken, in Rhenish Bavaria, the son of Theodore Erasmus and Margarethe Hilgard. His father was a lawyer, holding the position of chief justice of the court of appeals of the province. Judge Hilgard, having been born and educated under the shadow of the French Revolution, and being of pronounced liberal views, stoutly opposed the supercedence of the Code Napoleon by the illiberal laws of the old regime. In 1836, when at the fullness of a successful career, he determined to emigrate to America with his family and settled on a farm at Belleville, Illinois. As the public schools of that day were quite primitive,

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