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CHAPTER XV.

FRANCE.

I. Rheims-Face of the Country-Productions-Canals-

Population-Wines

331

II. Sagacity of Swine - Ice Cavern - Paris Jardins des

Plantes-Studies of the French Youth ....

335

HII. St. Denis

341

IV. Bois de Boulogne-St. Cloud

345

V. The Thuilleries-English Economists-Royal Library..

Charlatans-Theatres...

347

VI. The Catacombs-St. Germain Auxerrois--Massacre of

St. Bartholomew....

354

VII. General Survey of Chief Towns--Rouen- Its Maufac.

SECT.

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Hours

II. General Survey of Italy-Marble of Carrara-Phospho-

ric Stones- Mountain Flax-Manufacture of Asbestos

Cloth

428

III. Geography of Italy continued-Excursion to Montea-

Milan - Cathedral – Lodi --Buonaparte - Mantua-

Virgil-Church of St. JustinaPadua-Verona..... 431

IV. Venice-Manners of the Venetians-Theatres-Panto-

mime-Remarkable Arlequino and Signor Grimaldia

Venetian Ladies—Interesting Fate of Foscari-Church

of St. Mark....

437

V. Ferrara, Padua-Italian Town and Farm-Bologna-

The Appenines-Inflammable Exhalations..... 440

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SECT.
VI. Splendour of Italian Scenery-Florence-Church of the

Holy Cross-The Gallery of Florence-Sienna--Beg-
gars-St. Catherine of Sienna

443
VII. Journey to Rome-The Coliseum-Prison Scene...... 447
VIII. Pantheon - St. Peter's - Vatican - The Catacombs at

Rome-Banditti-Loss of their Servant-Terracina
Voyage to Naples_Scenery of its Bay-Manners-
Lazeroni-Baiæ ..

461
IX. Itinerant Monk-Messina Scylla-Charibdis .
X. Mount Etna-Syracuse-Archimedes-Dionysius's Pri-
son, built like a Human Ear..

464

CHAPTER XVIII.

VOYAGE THROUGH THE ISLANDS OF THE MEDITER-

RANEAN, AND JOURNEY IN GREECE.

VOYAGES AND TRAVELS.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION.

Edward Montague was an only son ; he with two daughters engrossed the whole attention of Mrs. Montague, who had been for some years a widow. Her son had never left her roof, and her maternal indulgence, which at times bordered upon weakness, had greatly impeded the benefit he might otherwise have derived from the instructions of a young man of considerable abilities, who had undertaken the arduous task of tutor in Mrs. Montague's family.

Time however passed rapidly away, and Edward approached his seventeenth year with a superficial knowledge of Greek and Latin, but without possessing even the requisites for the ordinary topics of conversation. His cousin, a boy about two years younger than himself, having spent the Midsummer holidays at Montague House ; Mrs. Montague could not help remarking the difference between the two boys. For the first time in her life she saw her son's deficiencies, and with a sigh regretted she had not sent Edward to school with his cousin. Her affection at length submitted to her good sense, and she wrote to Dr. Walker upon the subject, and begged he would point out the path she should pursue, in order before it was too late to repair her errors.

Dr. Walker was a gentleman of considerable literary but very extensive scientific knowledge. He had been the intimate friend of Mr. Montague, and in a very friendly manner answered this letier in person, when after a very long and interesting conversation, he proposed taking charge of Edward himself, provided Mrs. Montague would consent to their going abroad. Heart-breaking as was this proposal,

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after a few moments of painful silence she gave a trembling

assent; and leaving the Doctor to communicate the plan to - her son, she retired to her own chamber for about an hour, and then joined her family.

Preparations were immediately made for the departure of the travellers, and in the course of a fortnight all was ready. “ Heaven preserve you, iny dear boy,” said Mrs Montague, as she kissed Edward's cold cheek, “ Heaven preserve you." So far she had commanded her feelings, but fearing to agitate Edward, who appeared really palsied as she spoke, she gave her hand to Dr. Walker and hastily quitted the room.

Edward was roused from his reverie by the more demon. strative sorrow of his sisters at parting with him; and Dr. Walker having intimated to the young ladies, that their mother might perhaps require their attendance, they obeyed the hint, and with tearful eyes withdrew.

Dr. Walker allowed his young friend half an hour's silent meditation, and then ringing the bell, he enquired if all were ready for their departure. Being answered in the affirmative, “ Come Edward,” said the good man,

we shall be later than I intended.”

Edward took up his hat with a sigh, and observing a miniature of his mother which had been brought home that morning, he put it in his pocket, and bidding the servant say he had taken it, he followed the Doctor down stairs, and for the first time in his life quitted the paternal mansion unaccompanied by any of his family.

“ We will not be laughed at when we get to Rome, for our ignorance respecting our native land,” said Dr. Walker to his pupil, as the carriage drove through Portland-place. “ We will make an excursion through the British Isles, and we shall then have the pleasure of judging, whether we may not reap both profit and advantage from our peregrinations at home, as well as from more extensive rambles abroad. You have visited the principal buildings in London, and you will not be less pleased with some other cities of your native isle."

“ We shall go through Oxford, shall we not, sir?” enquired Edward, as his eye glanced over a travelling map of England, which the Doctor held in his hand, “ and so on to Worcester. But," continued he, “ I should like sometimes to deviate from the direct road.”

Dr. W.-" You shall be gratified in this request, although

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