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$255

Maynard
Piano

FULLY WARRANTED

THIS Quality Piano shipped

subject to approval, all charges paid. High grade stool and silk plush scarf included. Guaranteed for ten years. Combined capital back of this guarantee over $1,000,000. Sold on terms. Send for our illustrated catalogue of Pianos & Player Pianos. It contains interesting information.

DENVER MUSIC Co.

ESTABLISHED 1884

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COLORADO

SEE US BEFORE YOU ORDER

The O.P.Baur

Confectionery
Company.....

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THE FINEST BON BONS

& CHOCOLATES

The Denver Marble & Granite Co.

PHONE MAIN 1815

1224 LAWRENCE ST.

BRANCH OFFICE

AT ENTRANCE TO FAIRMOUNT CEMETERY

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COMMERCIAL SULPHURIC (ANY STRENGTH INCLUDING OLEUM)

MURIATIC AND NITRIC ACIDS, MIXED ACID (ANY FORMULA) ELECTROLYTE STRICTLY CHEMICALLY PURE SULPHURIC, HYDROCHLORIC AND NITRIC ACIDS AND AMMONIA AQUA AND ANHYDROUS AMMONIA, SALT CAKE AND NITRE CAKE

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The EVANS INVESTMENT

20-21 Evans Block, at the Central Loop

COMPANY

High Grade Bonds - Real Estate

We deal exclusively in our own holdings. We
are largely interested in and have charge of the

Central Savings Bank Building

ON 15TH ST. AT THE CENTRAL LOOP

Complete Law Library

Every Modern Convenience

For office space in this High-class Building see the RENTAL
AGENT on the premises, or communicate with us.

PHONE MAIN 1253

EVAN E. EVANS

PRESIDENT AND TREASURER

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The First Ascent of Long's Peak

Made by an Expedition under Maj. J. W. Powell

L. W. Keplinger

After the close of the great uncivil war, I attended school at the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, Ill. Professor Powell, as he was then called, was a member of the faculty in charge of what might be termed the scientific department. Powell had command of a battery during the war and had actively and efficiently participated in the Shiloh fight, where he lost an arm. In 1867 he made a trip to the mountains, accompanied by students of the Illinois State Normal School and of the Wesleyan University, among whom was J. C. Hartzell, a classmate of mine, who since has become a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The next year Powell organized a larger party made up of students of these two schools, and I joined it. Different Different departments of science were repre- country through which were were to sented, including botany, ornithol- travel is especially hard on unshod ogy, geology and entomology. My horses. The first thing was to shoe part was to determine altitudes and every animal. This was done, with latitudes at various points. I was equipped with sextant, barometers broncho. the exception of my dun-colored and chronometers furnished by the Smithsonian Institute. That institute furnished other facilities, but all quate. My broncho stayed unshod.

personal expenses were born by the members of the party.

We went on the Union Pacific to

Cheyenne, where each member of the party provided himself with a horse for riding, and a pack mule. We got horses out of a wild herd, none of them ever having been

backed or lassoed. That those from whom we purchased should back the animal once in our presence was part of the contract. This they did with results not particularly encouraging. Though some of us had been in the army, we had not been in the cavalry. A dun-colored broncho with dark streaks along the back

and down its legs fell to me. Those

in charge of the herd told me these

were "bad signs," and subsequent events justified the warning. The

It resisted every effort, until finally the facilities in Cheyenne were declared to be inade

6

The next thing was to break him to with no little trepidation I vaultedthe saddle.

Being busy with other matters, I made no attempt to mount him until after I had had no end of fun watching the experience of the others. All were thrown.

One was deposited

in a cactus patch and stayed sore for days. His relatives-prominent people residing in Illinois and in Kansas -may be interested to know that that was Allen. Allen was the ornithologist of the party, and the collection he made on the trip included every species of the feathered kind to be found in Colorado.

At this time Rev. W. H. Daniels, a divine of some eminence, who had been a teacher both at Normal and at the Wesleyan, and who had written a history of Methodism, was a member of our party. He, too, was thrown and his foot hung in the stirrup. Lying on his back on the ground he addressed himself now to his pony, and now to those who were "Take hold of her, standing by: boys, take hold of her! Whoa, whoa, you sweet little angel you! Take hold of her boys, take hold of her!"

To all my comments on the adventures of my broncho busting friends they replied, "Just wait until you tackle your dun-colored broncho. And finally the time came for me to do so. The pony stood mute and motionless. I put on the bridle; he remained unchanged in mien. I put on the saddle; the situation was absolutely peaceful. I cinched the girth tighter and tighter; he never flinched or batted an eye. Then I patted and petted him and told him how nice a pony he was, but he gave no sign either of appreciation or dissent. Then I folded my arms about his neck and actually dared to fold my legs around his fore legs. He made no objection. Then I bore down on the stirrup. Finally I put my foot into the stirrup, and at last

I believe that's the right word-into
the saddle. And still that broncho
stayed mute and motionless. Then I
renewed my pettings and pattings
wherever my hands could reach,
fore and aft. I took hold of his ears
one by one. I leaned forward and
folded my arms about his neck. He
remained motionless as the sphinx.
Then I called everybody's attention
-here was the pony that couldn't
be shod! I was a second Rarey, a
gentleman who in those days had a
national reputation as a horse tamer.
With the whole party for interested
and astonished spectators, I again
patted and petted and leaned for-
ward and folded my arms about my
broncho's neck. Finally some doubt-
ing Thomas suggested that it would
be more satisfactory to see a little
going, though it were ever so little.
So I
Sure enough, I hadn't thought of
that. Going there must be.
slapped gently and said "Go 'long,"
but he didn't go. Then I began spur-
ring, very gently at first, then harder
and still harder. Then he did per-
ceptibly flinch, but otherwise re-
mained motionless. The spectators
became intensely interested. Then
the spur was applied vigorously, ac-
companied by an imperative com-
mand to "Go 'long." And then there
was a going. Further particulars
will be omitted, except to say that I
was finally extricated from the re-
sulting heap of man, horse and sad-
dle. Nevertheless I kept at it, and
finally the beast was broken to ride.
I had a breaking experience later
from which also some amusement
was derived by the bystanders. My
pony became somewhat out of com-
mission by reason of being unshod,
so I was provided with a mule as a
substitute. This creature had been
a pack animal and it had to be
broken. Accompanied by Major
Powell, I led the mule out into an

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