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MONUMENT TO LADY CALVERT.

[FROM CUSSAN's History of Hertfordshire. Vol. II.]

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In the Chancel [of St. Mary's Church, Hertingfordbury) is an Altar Tomb on which is the recumbent effigy of a lady carved in white marble. She is habited in a richly embroidered dress with tight fitting sleeves, and a ruff about her neck. Over her head is a kerchief, which is thrown back, disclosing the face. On a tablet in front of the Tomb is this inscription :

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ANNÆ GEOR. F. IOAN. N. MINNA
AD OMNIA QUÆCUNQ. EGREGIA NATÆ AD

MELIORA REGRESSÆ
PIETATE PUDICITIÂ PRUDENTIÂ INCOMPA-

RABILIS FEMINÆ

GEORGIUS LEON. F. JOAN. N. CALVERTUS

EQ. AUR. INVICTISS. JACOBO REGI MAGNO-BRITANNICO FRANCICO HIBERNICO PIO FELICI ET SEMPER AUGUSTO SECRET. PRINC. ET A CONSILIIS SANCTIORIBUS QUICUM VIXIT ANNOS XVII SINE OFFENSA LIBEROSQ. PARI SEXUS DISCRIMINE X RELIQUIT CECILIUM LEONARDUM GEORGIUM FRANCISCUM HENRICUM ANNAM DOROTHEAM ELIZABETHAM GRACIAM HELENAM SEXTUM AUTEM FILIUM JOANNEM MORTIS HEU SUÆ LUCTUSQUE PATERNI PRODROMUM EDIDERAT TAM SUAVIS CONTUBERNII MEMOR MARITUS DOLORI ET DESIDERIO IMPAR CONJUGI SANCTISSIMÆ

HOC MONUMENTUM MANUBUS GEMINIS GEMENS POSUIT SIBIQ. ET SUIS [ET] POSTERIS EORUM

VIXIT A. XLII M. IX D. XVIII

On the edge of the slab on which the figure is laid

OBIT VIII° DIE AUG. Ao SALUTIS MDCXXI

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Over the monument are three shields of arms. On the centre shield : Paly of six, or and sable, a Bend counterchanged for Calvert, impaling Sable, a Fess dancetté paly of four gules and ermine, between six Crosses-crosslet argent for Mynne. On the other shields Calvert and Mynne alone.

[TRANSLATION OF THE EPITAPH. Sacred to Almighty God and to the most pleasing memory of Anne, daughter of George, and grand-daughter of John Minne, a woman born to all excellent things, who has departed to [a] better (world], for Piety, Chastity, Prudence, incomparable

George Calvert, son of Leonard, grandson of John, Knight, Chief Secretary and Privy Councillor to the invincible James King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Pious, Fortunate, and always August, with whom [sc. George Calvert] she lived seventeen years, void of offence, and left ten children, equal in number of each sex : Cecilius, Leonard, George, Francis, Henry, Anne, Dorothy, Elizabeth, Grace, Helen, and had given birth also to a sixth son, John, the forerunner, alas ! of her death and of his father's mourning—her husband, in memory of so sweet a wedded life, overcome by so great pain and grief, sorrowing, has placed with his hands this monument to his sainted wife, for himself, his [children], and their posterity.

She lived forty-two years, nine months, and eighteen days.
She died August the eighth, A. D. MDCXXI.]

A VISIT TO BOHEMIA MANOR.

REV. GEO. ARMISTEAD LEAKIN.

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During the recent summer, I visited with Rev. Mr. Shouler, of Elkton, and Mr. Johnson, author of a History of Cecil County, the site of the Labadist settlement on Bohemia Manor. We started from Elkton on July 17th, 1882, passed through Chesapeake City, and soon reached the place of our destination. The Labadist lot consisted of 4000 acres bought from Augustine Herman, who received his grant from Lord Baltimore, in 1660, principally in consideration of a valuable map of Maryland made by Herman, and now in the possession of our Society.

Jean Labadie, the founder of the Labadist sect, was born in France 1610. He deserted the Jesuits, and moving into Holland, Denmark and other places, established a communistic sect, which numbered several distinguished persons.

He died in 1674, and his successor attempted to establish a colony in Surinam on the surrender of New York by the Dutch to the English, but the climate of Surinam being unsuitable, his disciples, Sluyter and Dankers, were sent to find a place for another colony, and this they found on Bohemia Manor, and purchased in 1684. The colonists left Wiewerd, Friesland, April 12th, 1683, and reached this country on July 12th. This settlement continued until about 1722, when it expired, leaving as a relic one original building

The wonderful fertility of the soil with vast crops of corn and orchards of peaches, still amply justify the choice of the Labadist selection, “a noble piece of land." The ground extends to the

” Bohemia River for a long distance, allowing easy exportation of grain and importation of building and other material, besides furnishing an ample supply of fish and fowl. The distance is

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some seven miles from Elkton. We were cordially welcomed at the house of Mr. Hanson, whose wife was a Miss Biddle, a family connected with the early history of Cecil County. Herman directed that a stone monument should be erected over his grave, and this still exists in the yard of Mr. Hanson's house. It unfortunately is broken into three pieces, which can easily be cemented. It is a marble slab of oolite, the same as the stones which mark Mason and Dixon's line, 24 feet wide, 51 feet long and 3 inches thick, and has on it this inscription :

AUGUSTINE HERMAN, FIRST FOUNDER AND SEATER OF BOHEMIA MANOR, 1661.”

This was two years after Baltimore County was established, and thirteen before the establishment of Cecil, a Court of Baltimore County being held in 1664, at the house of Francis Wright (Clay Fall).

I think that this stone could easily be procured, and it certainly is worthy of preservation against future breakage, Herman being one of the most important men in the early history of Maryland, whose descendants are the Shippens, Hynsons, Frisbies, Bordleys, Brices, Dulanys, Chestons, Galloways, Jennings, and Randolphs.

It is a curious fact, that as late as 1687, this part of Maryland was disputed territory, William Penn, at that time warning James Frisbie not to pay taxes to Lord Baltimore.

After leaving the house of Mr. Hanson, beautifully situated on Bohemia River, we went first to the family vault, a few hundred feet southwest of the house.

Peter Bayard, nephew of Governor Stuyvesant, was one of the original Labadist trustees, to whom Herman deeded the land. He was the ancestor of the Bayard family, including Col. John Bayard, born on Bohemia Manor in 1738, who was at the battle of Trenton, and James A. Bayard, commissioner at the treaty of Ghent; James A. Bayard, son of the former, United States Senator, father of Senator Thomas F. Bayard. The manor house of Herman came into the possession of Richard Bassett, Governor of Delaware, through Peter Lawson. Governor Bassett con

with me.

structed the vault over which was placed originally the commemorative slab of Herman above mentioned, and where the Governor himself was buried, and also James A. Bayard, commissioner, with Ann Bassett, his wife, and two children.

The property subsequently descended to Richard Bassett Bayard, whose widow lives in this city, a descendant of Col. Howard. Before dying Mr. Bayard had the memorial stone removed, and the bodies transferred to a cemetery in Wilmington. Hence there is no relic of this vault, but a large chasm filled with dock and other weeds as though wishing to hide the ruin beneath.

The original manor house built by Herman, has been destroyed, and in its place farther from the river, was built, probably by Governor Bassett, the present residence of Mr. Hanson. It is easy to define the site of the ancient mansion from the growth of weeds and from the numerous old bricks, one of which I brought

The facts in reference to the family vault of Governor Bassett, were kindly furnished me by the Hon. Thomas F. Bayard.

It is remarkable that while the memorial slab of Herman is in the yard of Mr. Hanson's house, the actual place of interment is entirely unknown, though tradition places it under a large walnut tree a short distance from the vault. A sad commentary on human greatness; Herman, the possessor of 20,000 acres of the finest land, and the place of his burial is forgotten. There is in front of the present house, a large area with fences raised on mounds of earth, supposed to have been a park for deer.

We then went higher up the Bohemia River to inspect the original Labadist house. This is now occupied by an Irish family, the matron of which, perhaps suspicious of our visit and caring very little for historical research, did not give us a hearty wel

We supposed, however, from the windows and the brick, that this was of Labadist use and construction. Along this river with a portage of only six miles to the Apoguirnrinik Creek, a great trade in those early days was carried on between the Chesapeake and Delaware canals.

We then went to the site of a mill built by the Vanbibber family in 1703, and subsequently purchased by Sluyter, one of

come.

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