Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

8.9.24
AND HIS MOTIV E S.

BY

GEORGE MOORE, M.D.,

MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, LONDON, ETC.; AC.
THOR OF "THE POWER OF THE SOUL OVER THE BODY," "THE

USE OF THE BODY IN RELATION TO THE MIND,” ETC.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

NEW YORK:

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

82 CLIFF STREET.

1848.

PREFACE.

This work is somewhat religious; but it is hoped that the reader will not deem an apology necessary on that account, since it is impossible to reflect on the nature and motives of man, without concluding that religion is the end and purpose of

reason.

It was formerly the author's ambition to write acceptably on subjects more strictly professional, but circumstances having pressed the higher objects of thought upon his attention, he feels constrained to express his convictions, not because others have not better exhibited those truths which influence his own mind, but because the manner in which he has felt and presented them may suitably meet the state of some other hearts, and induce in them those sympathies, without which life, instead of brightening toward its close, is apt to become dark indeed.

(RECAP)

5747

238837

The topics propounded demand and deserve the fullest consideration of every man, but especially of him whose business it is to administer to the relief of mental and physical disorder. The medical practitioner can scarcely be engaged in his duties, with a right feeling of their importance, without discovering that moral influences operate very extensively, both in causing and in curing the majority of maladies. He sees, too, that religious hope enables a patient to bear calmly, and even cheerfully, those evils which therapeutic agents, however important, can neither remove nor ameliorate, while the absence of religion often aggravates disease, and adds terror to death,

The thoughts presented in this volume are such as occurred to the author, while fully occupied in his profession, and are those that his intimacy with sufferers and with suffering leads him to believe are most needed and most neglected.

The sick bed tests a man almost as much as the martyr's pyre; and those who there see something more than bodily disorder, often learn lessons of the greatest practical value, in relation to the spiritual training of man. The physician thus gains instruction for himself, and he who does his best to render such lessons available to others also, ought

66

rather to be deemed worthy of praise than of blame. Those views, which have encouraged the writer's own heart, under appointed and appropriate trial, will probably tend also, in some degree, to improve the faith, feeling, and practice of those who shall peruse, with candor and kindness, what has been writen in patience and hope.

This volume was designed, in connection with two others— The Power of the Soul over the Body in relation to Health and Morals,” and “ The Use of the Body, in relation to the Mind”—both of which have been so far favorably received as to warrant the expectation of an equally indulgent reception of this, which, although of rather a different complexion, will probably be thought an appropriate companion to them. Those persons who are disposed to dig deep, will discover indications in these works that they are based upon a substratum of more difficult materials, designedly kept out of sight. We give an architect credit for laying a good foundation, notwithstanding he conceals it under what is intended to be familiar. The suggestion of an argument is usually sufficient for all the practical purpose of persuasion, since those who are reasonable enough to judge of moral truth, readily work out ideas in their own

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »