Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture

Передняя обложка
Cornell University Press, 1993 - Всего страниц: 250
0 Отзывы
Google не подтверждает отзывы, однако проверяет данные и удаляет недостоверную информацию.

Prostitute, adulteress, unmarried woman who engages in sexual relations, victim of seduction--the Victorian "fallen woman" represents a complex array of stigmatized conditions. Amanda Anderson here reconsiders the familiar figure of the fallen woman within the context of mid-Victorian debates over the nature of selfhood, gender, and agency. In richly textured readings of works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, among others, she argues that depictions of fallen women express profound cultural anxieties about the very possibility of self-control and traditional moral responsibility.

Результаты поиска по книге

Отзывы - Написать отзыв

Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

Содержание

Social Science and the Great Social Evil
22
SelfReading
66
Gaskells Mary Barton and Ruth
108
Авторские права

Не показаны другие разделы: 3

Другие издания - Просмотреть все

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения

Об авторе (1993)

Amanda Anderson is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English at Brown University and Director of the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University. She is the author of The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory and Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment and coeditor of Disciplinarity at the Fin de Siècle.

Библиографические данные