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PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

4" COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

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58% receive less than

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62% receive less than

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on a tead som Percent of Institutions Below American Library Association Standords

esrollo 60 bata anul Source: The se percentages are locatie based on 1960-61 data reported by 1,666 buat

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SPECIAL LIBRARIES Y LIBH governmental agency, a newspaper, magazine, or advertising agency

, or any other organization whose activity creates a need for library Associato service within a particular field or discipline. Highly specialized

departments in public and in college or university libraries are occaNS sionally considered as special libraries.

It is estimated that there are 10,000 persons employed in 7,500 special libraries in the following types of organizations: Associations, societies..

3, 000 Companies....

2, 800 Government agencies. Total...

7, 550 S

Inclusion of the special library departments of some 250 public and 2,200 college and university libraries would increase the total to 10,000 special libraries with some 15,000 employees. In addition, a Federal survey reveals that an estimated 850 persons are employed in approximately 90 technical information centers.

1, 750

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LIBRARY SERVICES ACT

The collection and publication by the Federal Government of statistics relating to public libraries dates back to the 1860's and the inception of the U.S. Office of Education. The Federal legislative role in stimulating State and local action in the library field was recognized in 1956 with the passage of the Library Services Act (Public Law 84-597). Extended by Public Law 86–679 until June 30,

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1966, the act authorizes $7.5 million annually for grants to the States
for the extension of public library services to rural areas (places of
under 10,000 population).
Under the stimulus of the Library Services Act:

Thirty-six million rural residents have new or improved

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information people had only inadequate service. Moreover, urban libraries in
es hare best communities of over 10,000 population are ineligible for benefits under
libraries the act and have little financial incentive to participate in cooperative
to assist la programs for extending service to adjacent areas.
Orary SeTTES
ppropriate

Expenditures under State plans for library services 1 1956 and 1

(Fiscal year data in thousands of dollars)

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! Provisional data from reports filed with the U.S. Office of Education by participating States and out-
lying parts under the Library Services Act. Data may not add to totals due to rounding.

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de la result STATEMENT OF FRANCIS KEPPEL, U.S. COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION,

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE, ON "TITLE
VI-C: PUBLIC COMMUNITY LIBRARIES," IN H.R. 3000, NATIONAL
EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 1963, BEFORE THE SELECT
SUBCOMMITTEE ON EDUCATION, House COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION
AND LABOR, APRIL 9, 1963

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I am honored to
appear before the Select Subcommittee on Education in support of
title VI, part C, the public community library provisions of the
National Education Improvement Act of 1963.

The public library is a basic educational resource. The widespread recognition that education is a lifelong process has dramatized the importance of having good public library service readily available to every citizen. Good libraries are as important as the purposes they serve and without them we cannot hope to achieve the social, educational, cultural, and economic goals of the individual and of society.

Our national investment in good public library service is a direct and highly productive contribution to the intellectual life of our Nation. Today's library is not only a place of study and research. It is also a busy marketplace of ideas, a reservoir of practical, factual information, and a source of continuing cultural and social enlightenment.

Businessmen are learning that libraries have a real dollars and cents value to them. Manufacturers' departments need current data on technological developments; researchers need special indexes, monographs, and statistics; and sales personnel need data on markets,

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98-466 0 - 63 - (Vol. 5) - 7

buyer motivation, and sales techniques. Mr. Arthur S. Owens, the city manager of Roanoke, Va., underscored this economic value of good libraries by saying:

It is no secret that the outstanding public library programs of New Orleans, La., and Charlotte, N.C., to cite onlę two, have played important roles in attracting industry to these growing cities.

The increased national concern with manpower training and retraining has already made new demands on public libraries. In several economically depressed areas, a substantial contribution to job retraining programs is being made by public libraries which are participating in the present Libraries Services Act.

Public libaries have many uses: Children use public library resources to stretch their imaginations and to build good reading habits which will benefit them throughout life. Students of all ages engaged in a both formal and informal educational activities pursue independent on study, each at his own pace and in his own way Housewives and mothers rely on the library for the practical information they need 88, consumers to guide the growth of a happy, healthy family. The increasing numbers of the aged and the retired are continuing to make their personal lives rich and productive through the pleasures of

, reading

These and other demands on public libraries demonstrate that good library is more than just a collection of books. It is, in fact, part of a complex communications system which should bring together the library user and the material or information he needs. The library users of today and tomorrow will be more sophisticated, more highly educated, and more numerous than their counterparts of res terday. Their library needs will

be more complex, greater in quantity, and more expensive to meet. To do this job will require a working partnership among all levels of government, a partnership which has had a highly promising beginning in the present Library Services Act.

That program, Public Law 597, 84th Congress, 2d session, amended, now in its seventh year of operation. It is having real success in extending and improving our rural public libraries of special significance is the fact that State appropriations for public library services have increased 92 percent and funds from local govern ment for the same purpose have risen 71 percent since the act went into effect.

These funds have provided 38 million rural residents with new or improved public library facilities. More than 350 bookmobiles have been placed in operation under this program and over 10 million books and other informational materials have been purchased for use by rural readers.

The leadership capacity of State library agencies has been increased. More than 130 professional public library field consultants have been employed by the States to carry out State plan projects. Seven States have begun or greatly expanded programs of cash grants-in-aid to local libraries.

Although we can be proud of these accomplishments, much remins to be done. In 1961, 18 million persons (16.5 million rural, 1.5 million urban) still had no readily accessible public library service available to them. Reports from State libraries also indicate that 110 million

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