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INSPECTORS OF FACTORIES

OF THE

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO

1911.

REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR JAMES T. BURKE.

To the Honorable the Minister of Agriculture:

SIR, I have the honor to submit to you the twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Factories Inspectors for the Province of Ontario for the year ending December 31st, 1911.

It is a source of gratification to be able to say that the work of inspection this year has been attended with good results. This has been brought about in certain cases by having resorted to the Courts, but on the whole there has been comparatively little friction in having our recommendations and the law carried out. The usual large amount of work has been done by the Inspectors in instructing, warning or persuading employers to a better observance of the law, and the investigation of accidents and complaints-the latter of the usual variegated character has also occupied a portion of their time.

The inspection of several Chinese laundries throughout the Province was another feature of this year's work. This necessitated having the most salient points of the Factories' Act translated from English into the Chinese language, which is naturally better understood, and in consequence the laundry premises are much improved. The owners of some of these buildings have in the past been relieved by the laundry people from making needed repairs, and now complain that the enforcement of the Act militates against their pocket books because they are compelled to fix up these properties so that they may be termed habitable.

Many special inquiries too have been made into processes which are considered to have injurious effects on those engaged in them, and the Department has been in close communication with Factory Inspection Departments in older countries which have had a senior experience, with the results that we have obtained many perfected ideas relating to the testing of air and suction pressures, both of which are very useful in determining what impurities the air in a work room may contain, and also in coping with suction fan pressures which should be as nearly uniform at all openings as it is possible to make them, in order to remove dust, gases, etc., which are deleterious to those employed at such work as polishing, grinding and buffing We have also about perfected a regulation for the safety of retorts used under steam pressure in canning factories.

The fumes that arise from wood alcohol when used for commercial purposes have caused us to make special inquiries in order to provide a remedy that will protect the health of the employees.

The question, also, of lead poisoning caused by inhaling fumes from linotype machines required us to make a special investigation, which resulted in findng a remedy that will protect operators from being obliged to work in this atmosphere.

No changes have taken place in regard to the staff, and there has been no alteration in boundaries or arrangement of districts.

Industrial development continues, and a good many new industries have been reported.

There were 8,690 inspections made during the past year in 472 cities, towns and villages. Of these 313 were made exclusively in connection with inforcing the Stationary Engineers' Act in places that did not come under the Factories' Act, and the requirement of the Stationary Engineers' Act were also pointed out by the Inspectors to every steam user in the course of their regular inspections.

In the following table is shown the variety of places inspected and the number of inspections made in each place:

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In these factories and mercantile establishments there were (approximately) 234,561 employees.

Three thousand, one hundred and fifteen recommendations were made by the Inspectors dealing with the following subjects: Boiler inspection, child labor, cleanliness, elevators, fire-escapes, mode of wearing the hair, guards for machinery, hours of labor, sanitation, seats for females, ventilation, miscellaneous. A large proportion of these recommendations have been complied with.

ACCIDENTS.

There were nine hundred and eighty-five accidents reported during the year 1911, which is an increase over last year. This at first sight may seem extraordinary, but there are two reasons for it: one is that nearly all minor accidents are reported some firms report every accident no matter how trivial it is-and another is an increasing observance of the law in this respect. All fatal accidents, and a large number of the more serious ones, were investigated, but as may be seen from the number reported, it is impossible to investigate every one. A glance at the appended list will show that a large percentage were due to causes which could not reasonably be foreseen, and could only be avoided by the exercise of care on the part of the employees themselves.

The extended use of electricity increases the danger of accidents from that

source, although only two fatalities were reported this year. These, however, were of an unusual nature. I refer to those accidents where one man was killed while in the act of receiving an electric lamp from another, and another man while attaching a bulb to a socket.

Fatal accidents totalled forty-four, proportionately the same number as in 1910, and are as follows:

HARRY QUESNEL, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, after throwing switch climbed on hoist, and as boom was swinging round, arm caught in gear which threw him around until stopped by hoist man. Was killed instantly.

HARRY MARTZ, employed by J. R. Booth, Ottawa, fell from ledge to platform of elevator car, dying a few hours after. He was standing on top of elevator floor doors oiling, when elevator started up.

HARRY WILSON, employed by the Slingsby Manufacturing Co., Brantford, died from lock jaw, developed from an injury to hand which was caught in carding

machine.

STANISLAU KTUKIEC, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, slipped under moving coke car and had both legs taken off. Died subsequently.

ALBERT CATENA, employed by the Canada Foundry Co., Davenport, had his skull fractured and neck broken. Fell off boiler in boiler shop yard.

H. DARKE, employed by the Canadian General Electric Co., Peterborough, was killed while tightening up clamp which fastened machine to floor. A belt caught his smock, pulling him in between pulley and belt.

JAMES L. DIXON, employed by the Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton, died. from electric shock. Placed hands on fuse block.

DAVID CROXFORD, employed by the Canada Foundry Co., Davenport, while coupling a portable yard derrick to a flat car was crushed between derrick and car. JAMES WEAVER, employed by the Gartshore-Thomson Pipe & Foundry Co., Hamilton, was killed by load of cores falling on him. Arm of car collapsed.

ANGELO D'ANGELO, NICHOLAS MILLER, and WALTER ALBROUGH, Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, were killed through ammonia sulphate basket bursting.

T. N. COLE, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, fell from a ladder, fracturing his skull. Died shortly after.

JAMES GIRALDI, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, while dragging a piece of hose across a track was struck by locomotive and had hand and both feet cut off. Death resulted.

BEN. ANDREW, employed by J. & C. Greer, Selwyn Lake, was struck on the jaw by an axe hurled back by pulley. Was removing belt from pulley.

WILLIAM MERCER, employed by the Port Hope Preserving Co., Port Hope, died from injuries received through explosion of retort on steam cooker.

LEO. COLEY, employed by Northrop-Lyman Co., Toronto, was crushed between elevator and side of shaft. Accident not witnessed.

W. MISSON, employed by the Jenckes Machine Co., St. Catharines, while receiving an electric lamp from another man supposed to have received a shock, dying instantly.

WILLIAM MCGREGOR, employed by the Port Credit Brick Co., Port Credit, was smothered in a clay bin. Accident not witnessed.

THOMAS GODFREY, employed by the Russell Motor Car Co., Toronto, died while attaching an electric bulb to socket. Supposed to have received shock.

T. WARNER, employed by the Russel Motor Car Co., Toronto, died from blood poisoning, the result of injury to foot received while buffing bicycle parts. Piece of work fell on foot.

JOHN MCADOREY, employed by the Strathroy Furniture Co., Strathroy, was struck in abdomen by a piece of wood thrown back from rip saw. Died shortly after. FRANK LEFAVE, employed by the Canadian General Electric Co., Peterborough, was struck in the stomach by loading table which protruded beyond door and was caught by box car.

PETER DAWSON, employed by the Rainy River Lumber Co., Rainy River, while replacing machine chain on transfer platform was drawn between sprockets and platform and abdomen torn open. He had stopped as if to replace incline chain with foot.

NICHOLAS HOMEICK, employed by the Gurney Foundry Co., West Toronto, was struck on the head by emery wheel which had burst.

JOSEPH DRAPER, employed by the Anglo-Canadian Leather Co., Huntsville, was drowned while unloading a scow.

ROBERT W. MARTIN, employed by the Canadian Pacific Railway Co., West Toronto, while removing ring and door from smoke box, was struck on the back by ring, and died shortly after. On seeing ring falling he jumped into pit and the ring followed.

B. HAIGHT, employed by the Kinleith Paper Co., St. Catharines, was wound up on shaft and killed.

JAMES ALLAN, employed by the B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton, was killed by falling down elevator shaft.

CHARLES TINO, employed by the Canadian Bridge Co., Walkerville, while delivering a load of rivets was caught by revolving drill.

DENNIS MURRAY, an employee of the Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto, was killed in fly wheel. Was supposed to have pulled on fly wheel while throttle of engine was open, and was caught between arm of wheel and floor.

F. WATERHOUSE, employed by the Canada Foundry Co., Davenport, fell from ladder, fracturing his skull.

PATRICK BARRETT, employed by the Hamilton Milling Co., Hamilton, was caught in a pulley. Accident not witnessed.

J. BORELAND, employed by the Canadian General Electric, Peterborough, stepped into loop formed by wire and was drawn against shaft. Broke leg and died from shock.

MURDO BOSS, employed by the Waterous Engine Works, Co., Brantford, was killed by heavy casting falling on him.

LOUIS GUILLON, employed by the Canada Cement Co., Port Colborne, was struck by moving locomotive and fatally injured.

ILKO KOBLANSKI, F. LAZORKA, and R. SZEWOZUK, employees of the Riordan Paper Co., Hawkesbury, died from scalds received while working in dump pit. Door in top of partition between digesters was blown off and steam entered pit.

ALFRED BINNETTE, employed by the Riordan Paper Co., Hawkesbury, while putting drive belt on pulley was caught and wound around shaft.

NAPOLEON PROULX, employed by the Crown Laundry, Ottawa, was playing with extractor while same was in motion, and had elbow dislocated. Died subsequently.

A. PIERCE, employed by the Canada Cycle & Motor Co., West Toronto, had skin torn from knuckle and died from blood poisoning.

EDWARD MINER, employed by J. R. Booth, Ottawa, while attending Wet

Machine had his arm caught between cylinder mould and couch rolls, and was drawn in to shoulder, death occurring instantly.

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WILLIAM GOGGIN, employed by the Port Credit Starch Co., Port Credit, while tightening a nut under germ cooker, was caught on revolving shaft.

WILLIAM FAIRWEATHER, employed by the Hamilton Bridge Co., Hamilton, was killed by steel plate falling on his head.

EUGENE GEHL, employed by the National Furniture Co., Berlin, while adjusting belt was drawn on to shaft.

JOHN FAUBERT, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, while hoist was being swung round he was caught between carriage and top of machine and crushed.

HERBERT MOORE, employed by the McCormick Manufacturing Co., London, was killed while passing the end of a belt through floor. He was caught in shafting.

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