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it, that when the legs or loins were hurt below, "both bodies were fenfible of this pain in common, but when it was pricked, or otherwise "hurt above, the sense of the pain did affect one body only; which difference was also more confpicuous at its death, for one of the bodies died many days before the other, and that which furvived, being half putrified, pined away by degrees. This monster lived twenty-eight "years and then died. I am the more confident," adds the Hiftorian, " in relating this story, be"cause there are many honest and credible perfons yet alive who faw this prodigy with their own eyes."

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LORD BURLEIGH

Was very much preffed by fome of the Divines of his time, who waited on him in a body, to make fome alterations in the Liturgy. He defired them to go into the next room by themfelves, and bring him in their unanimous opinion upon some of the difputed points. They returned, however, to him. very foon, without being able to agree. "Why, Gentlemen," faid he, "how can you expect "that I fhould alter any point in difpute, when

you, who must be more competent, from your

"fituation,

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fituation, to judge than I can poffibly be, cannot agree among yourselves in what manner you "would have me alter it?"

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Lord Burleigh, very differently from many other fuppofed great Minifters, used to fay, that "warre "is the curfe, and peace the bleffinge of a coun"trie."—"A realme," added he, gaineth "more by one year's peace than by tenne years "warre."

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With refpect to the education of children, he thought very differently from Lord Chesterfield and the other luminaries of this age; for he used to fay," that the unthrifty loofeness of youth in "this age was the parents' faults, who made "them men seven years too foone, having but "children's judgements." He would also add, that "that Nation were happye where the Kinge "would take counfell and followe it."-" I "will," faid he, "never trufte anie man not of "founde religion, for he that is falfe to God can "never be true to man."

Lord Burleigh's conduct as a Judge feems to have been very praise-worthy and exemplary, and might be imitated by fome of our prefent Courts of Justice. "He would never," fays his Biographer," fuffer Lawyers to digreffe or wrangle « in pleadinge; advifing Counsellors to deale "truely and wifely with their clients, that if the matter were naught, to tell them fo, and not

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"to foothe them; and where he found fuch a

Lawyer, he would never thinke him honefte, "nor recommende him to anie prefermente, as "not fit to be a Judge that would give false "counsel."

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Thefe particulars are extracted from a life of this great man, published foon after his death by one of his houfehold. It is to be met with in Mr. Collins's Life of Lord Burleigh.

Dr. Wall, in his tranflation of Cicero's Epiftles, fays, that this great Statefman made them his glaffe, his rule, his oracle, his ordinance, and his pocket-book.

Lord Burleigh wrote fome excellent Advice for his Son, which is here fubjoined, and may still be perused with inftruction, in fpite of the alteration of the times, as it contains that fund of general good fenfe and knowledge of the world which is applicable to all times and to all fituations. The perfon to whom it was addreffed applied it fo fuccefsfully to his own life and conduct, that he became Lord Treafurer of England, Earl of Salifbury, and one of the greateft Statesmen of his time.

(( SON ROBERT,

"The vertuous inclinations of thy matchlefs "mother, by whofe tender and godly care thy infancy was governed, together with thy edu

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"cation under fo zealous and excellent a tutor, "puts me in rather affurance than hope, that "thou art not ignorant of the fummum bonum, "which is only able to make thee happy as well "in thy death as life: I mean, the true know

ledge and worship of thy Creator and Re"deemer, without which all other things are vaine "and miferable. So that thy youth being guided by fo fufficient a teacher, I make no doubt but "he will furnish thy life with divine and moral "documents. Yet, that I may not caft off the "care befeeming a parent towards his child, or "that thou shouldeft have caufe to derive thy "whole felicity and welfare rather from others "than from whence thou receivedft thy breath " and being, I think it fitt and agreeable to the "affection I beare thee, to help thee with fuch "rules and advertisements, for the fquaring of thy life, as are rather gained by experience than by "much reading, to the end that entering into this "exorbitant age, thou mayeft be the better prepared to fhunne those scandalous courfes where"unto the world and the lack of experience may

eafily draw thee. And because I will not con"found thy memory, I have reduced them into "Ten Precepts; and next unto Mofes' Tables, "if thou imprintft them in thy mind, thou fhalt "reap the benefit, and I the content. And they "are thefe following:

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"1. When

I.

"1. When it shall please God to bring thee to "man's estate, use great providence and circumspection in chufing thy wife, for from thence " will spring all thy future good or evil; and it is "an action of life, like unto a ftratagem of warre, "wherein a man can erre but once. If thy estate "be good, match neere home, and at leifure; if weak, far off and quickly. Enquire diligently "of her difpofition, and how her parents have "been inclined in their youth. Let her not be " poore, how generous foever, for a man can buy nothing in the markett with gentility: nor chuse "a bafe and uncomely creature altogether for "wealth, for it will caufe contempt in others, and loathing in thee. Neither make choice of (a) dwarfe, or (a) fool; for by the one thou shalt beget a race of pigmies, the other will be thy continual difgrace, and it will yirke thee to hear her talk; for thou fhalt find it, to thy great grief, that there is nothing more fulsome than a "The foole.

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"And touching the guiding of thy houfe, let thy hofpitallitie be moderate; and, according "to the meanes of thy eftate, rather plentifull than fparing, but not coftly. For I never knewe "any man grow poore by keeping an orderly table, but fome confume themselves through fecret vices, and their hofpitalitie bears the "blame. But banifh fwinifh drunkards out of "thine

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