Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

"and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, "and drew after him a great number of difciples " and followers. Cartwright afterwards disturbs "the ftate of the University; is recommended to "be quiet, but to no purpose; and is at last expelled, after having refused to affist at a con"ference which Archbishop Whitgift offered him. "Cartwright afterwards publifhed in 1591, a "book of New Difcipline, for which he was pro"ceeded against in the Star Chamber.”

cr

Hooker, fpeaking of Archbishop Whitgift, fays, " he always governed with that moderation which "ufeth by patience to fupprefs boldness, and to "make them conquer that fuffer." The Archbishop was anxious that the Curates' ftipends fhould be raised. His Biographer fays of him, "In letting leafes of his impropriations, if he "found his Curates' wages fmall, he would abate "much of his fine to increase their pensions, some "ten pounds by the year, as Maidstone, &c." Queen Elizabeth," continues the Archbishop's Biographer, "told his Grace, that she "would have the difcipline of the Church of England of all men duly to be observed with"out alteration of the leaft ceremony; conceiving "that thefe Novelifts might have wrought the "fame mifchief in her kingdom which the tur"bulent Orators of Sparta did in that Common"wealth, fo wifely fettled by Lycurgus's Laws, "<< which,

<<

[ocr errors]

which, whilft they took upon themselves to amend, they miferably defaced and deformed; "the inconvenience of which kind of reasoning "the Queen had taken out of the Greek Poet Ara"tus, who, when one asked him how he might «have Homer's Poems free from faults and cor

"

"

ruptions, replied, Get an old copy not reformed; " for curious wits, labouring to amend things well " done, commonly either quite mar them, or at "leaft make them worse."

[ocr errors]

"THIS Nobleman," says Puttenham, “ paffing from England towards Italie, by her Majeftie Queen Elizabeth's licence, was very honourably entertained at the Court of Bruffells by the Lady Duchefs of Parma, Regent there. "And fitting at a banquet with her, (where was "alfo the Prince of Orange, with all the great "Princes of the State,) the Earle, though he "could reasonably well speake French, would "not fpeak one French word, but all English. "Whether he asked any question or answered it, "all was done by Truchemen (interpreters); info"much as the Prince of Orange, marvelling at it, "looked

[ocr errors]

HENRY EARL OF ARUNDEL.

[ocr errors]

"looked afide on that part where I ftood a beholder "of all the feafte, and fayed, I marvel your Noble"men of England doe not defire to be better languaged in the foreigne languages. This word "was by and by repeated to the Earl again. Tell "my Lord the Prince, quoth he, that I love to

fpeak in that language in which I can beft utter "my mind, and not mistake.”

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

SIR ROGER CHAMLOE.

"Ir is a notable tale," fays Roger Afcham, in his Schoolmaster, "that old Syr Roger Chamloe, fometime Chiefe Juftice, would tell of him"felfe. When he was Auncient in Inn of Court, "certaine yong Jentlemen were brought before " him to be corrected for certaine misorders, and "one of the luftieft fayde, Sir, we be yong Jen"tlemen, and wife men before us have proved all

facions, and yet thofe have done full well. "This they fayd, because it was well known that "Syr Roger had been a good felloe in his youth. "But he answered them very wifelie: Indeede "(faith he) in youthe I was as you are now, and "I had twelve felloes like unto myfelf, but not "one of them came to a good ende. And there

"fore,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

"fore, folowe not my example in youth, but "folowe my councell in age, if ever ye think to "come to this place, or to theis yeares that I am " come unto, leffe ye meet either with povertie or "Tiburn in the way.'

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ROGER ASCHAM.

"SYR RICHARD SACKVILLE, a worthie Jen"tleman of worthie memorie, in the Queene's (Elizabeth) privie chamber at Windfore, after " he had talked with me for the right choice of "a good witte in a childe for learnyng, and of "the trewe difference betwixt quicke and harde "wittes; of alluring young children by jentle"nefs to love learnyng, and of the speciall "care that was to be had, to keepe young men "from licentious livyng; he was most earnest "with me to have me fay my mynde alfo, what "I thought concerning the fanfic that many

young Jentlemen of Englande have to travell "abroad, and namely to lead a long life in "Italie. His requeft, both for his authoritie "and good will toward me, was a fufficient "commaundement unto me, to fatisfie his pleafure with utteryng plainlie my opinion in that

"matter.

"matter. Syr Syr (quoth I) I take goyng thither, " and livyng there, for a yonge Jentleman, that "doth not goe under the kepe and garde of "fuch a man, as both by wifedome can, and "authoritie dare rewle him, to be marvelous danст gerous."

Tyme was," fays Afcham, in another part of his learned and excellent Treatife of the Schoolmaster, "when Italie and Rome have bene, to the great good of us that now live, the best breeders and bringers up of the "worthieft men, not onlie for wife fpeakinge, "but also for well doinge, in all civil affaires, "that ever was in the worlde. But now that

"

tyme is gone, and though the place remayne, yet the olde and prefent manners do differ as "farre as blacke and white, as virtue and vice, "Virtue once made that countrie mistress over "all the world; vice now maketh that countrie "flave to them, that before were glad to ferve "it. Italie now, is not that Italie it was wont "to be; and therefore now not fo fitte a place as "fome do counte it, for yong men to fetch either "wifedome or honesty from thence. For furelie they will make others but bad fcholers, that be "fo ill mafters to themfelves."

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

"If you think," fays this learned man in another place, "that we judge amiffe, and write "too fore against you, heare what the Italian fayth

[ocr errors]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »