Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

"Wales, which your uncle, Don Baltazar, under"ftood, and fo treated the match ever with in"tention to delay it; yet, notwithstanding it is "now fo far advanced, that confidering all the "overtures unto it for the Infanta, it is time to "feek fome means to divert the treaty, which I "would have you find, and I will make it "good whatsoever it be; but in all other things promote the fatisfaction of the King of Great "Britain, who hath deserved very much, and it " shall content me much, so that it be not in the "match."

[ocr errors]

SIR WALTER RALEIGH.

"ABOUT this time," fays Wilfon, « that gal"lant fpirit Sir Walter Raleigh (who in his "receffes in the Tower had presented in lively "characters the true image of the Old World) "made acceffes to the King, whereby he got "leave to vifit the New World in America; Captain Kemifh (one of his old feamen and fervants) fhewing him a piece of ore in the "Tower of a golden complexion, (a glittering "temptation, to begin the work,) affuring him, "he could bring him to a mine in Guiana of "the

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

"the fame metall: which (together with free"dome, the crown of life and being) gave rife to "this enterprize."

The following Notices of Sir Walter Raleigh are copied from Aubrey's Biographical Notes in the Afhmolean Library at Oxford:

"He was a great Chymift, and amongst some "MS. receipts I have feen fome fecrets from him. "He studied moft in his fea voyages, where he "carried always with him a cheft of books, and "had nothing to divert him.

"A person so much immerfed in action, and "in the fabrication of his own fortune, till his "confinement in the Tower, could have but "little time to study but what he could spare in "the morning. He was no fleeper*, had a "wonderful waking fpirit, and great judgment to "guide it.

"He was a tall, handfome, and brave man ; "but his bane was, that he was damnably proud. Old Sir Robert Harley, of Bramp"ton Bryan Caftle, would fay, 'Twas a great "question which was the proudeft, Sir Walter 46 Raleigh or Sir Thomas Overbury; but the dif"ference that was, was judged on Sir Thomas's "fide."

[ocr errors]

In a converfation which Drummond of Hawthornden had with Ben Jonson, the latter, fpeak

ing

He allowed himself five hours to reft.

[ocr errors]

ing of the English Poets, said, that " Spenfer's "stanza pleased him not, nor his matter; "the meaning of the allegory of his Fairy Queen "he had delivered in writing to Sir Walter Ra

leigh; which was, that by the bleating beast he "understood the Puritans, and by the falfe Dueffa "the Queen of Scots." Ben farther obferved, "That Sir Walter Raleigh efteemed more fame "than confcience: the best wits in England were employed in making his hiftory. Ben himself had written a piece to him of the Punic war, "which he altered, and fet in his book." Works of William Drummond of Hawthornden, Fol. Edit. 1711, p. 225.

[ocr errors]

A COPY OF SIR W. RALEIGH'S LETTER SENT TO MR. DUKE IN DEVON.

<: MR. DUKE,

"I write to Mr. Prideaux to move you for the purchase of Hayes, a farm fome time in my "father's poffeffion. I will moft willingly give "whatsoever in your confcience you fhall deeme "it worth; and if at any time you shall have " occafion

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

"Hayes is in the parish of Eaft Badleigh, Devon. Sir "Walter was not buried in Exeter by his father and mother,

nor at Sherborne in Dorfetfhire; at either of which places "he defired his wife (in his letter the night before his death) "to be interred. His father lived eighty years on this farm, and wrote Efquire."-Note by AUBREY.

[ocr errors]

"occafion to use me, you fhall find me a thank"full friend to you and yours. I am refolved (if I cannot entreat you) to build at Colleton; "but for the natural difpofition I have to that place (being born in that house) I had rather "feate myself there than any where else. I take "my leave, readie to countervaile all your cour"tefies to the utter of my power. Court, y xxvi " of July 1584.

"Your very willing friend

"In all I fhall be able,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

<s

"I have now forgot," fays Mr. Aubrey from Dr. Pell," whether Sir Walter was not for the putting of Mary Queen of Scots to death. I "thinke yea; but befides that, at a confultation "at Whitehall after Queen Elizabeth's death, "how matters were to be ordered, and what

ought to be done, he declared his opinion, " 'twas the wifeft way for them to keep the "staffe in their own hands, and fet up a Com"monwealth, and not to be fubject to a needy beggarly nation. It feems there were fome "of this Caball who kept not this fo fecret but "that it came to King James's eare, who was at where the English No"bleffe mett and received him; and being told "upon their entrance to his Majestie their

VOL. I.

S

"names,

[ocr errors]

"WALTER RALEIGH."

[ocr errors]

"names, when Sir W. R'. name was told, he "faid, "O' my foul, mon! I have heard, Rawly " of thee."

"Sir Walter was fuch a perfon (every way) that, " as King Charles fays of the Lord Strafford, a "Prince would rather be afrayd of than afhamed of, he had that awfulness and afcendancy in his aspect over other mortals.

"It was a moft ftately fight, the glory of that "reception of his Majefty, where the nobility "and gentry were in exceeding rich equipages, having enjoyed a long peace under the most "excellent of Queens; and the company was "fo. exceeding numerous, that their obedience, duty, and refpect, carried a dread with it. "King James did not inwardly like it, and with an "inward envy said, that though so and so, as be

fore, he doubted not but he fhould have been "able of his own ftrength (fhould the English "have kept him out) to have been able to have "dealt with them, and got his rights. Sir. W. "Ralegh fayd to him, Would to God that had "been put to the tryal !---- Why do you wish that? replied the King.----Because, faid Sir W. that "then you would have knowne your friends from your foes. But that reason of Sir W'. was never "forgotten or forgiven.

"When he was attached by the Officer about "the bufineffe which coft him his head, he was conveyed

<<

"

[ocr errors]

"

[ocr errors]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »