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'ikingly portrays

ed with a cita-, themselves and their associates, alike of especially at ti

To widely and misery in this world and of eternal destruc

been con- tion in the world to come.” Pur and real

has been “During the twelve months over which ? person ca rious th

I never this lady's exertions have extended, no fewer

or the than 250 girls have been reclaimed. Of cting 1

the these, so far as is known, only 20 have teres the

vin relapsed, and of this number several have

returned in bitter penitence, and are now doing well. 85 of these girls have been estored to their parents, upwards of 40 engaged as domestic servants in different cities, and the remainder are engaged scellaneous employments, of whom "O are at present under the care and

on of this lady." Famii

letached paragraphs, extracted I. Lona

troduction, sufficiently explain alpin.

1 objects of this volume. It sond volume of this noble

ch may well appear side by Sacred Scriptures is now befox

red Homes and how to ud is every way equal to the preceding

aste to the Rescue," and volume, to which, on a former occasion, we

luctions of recent date. referred. The profuse and appropriate The

John Snow, Paterillustrations will make it a favourite amongst written, the poor ; and we feel assured that if by many was

tle, and certainly ample facilities were afforded to the mem- prive them of

aven in its adbers and Sunday scholars of country con. original biographies. These sermons gregations this Bible would be subscribed book for boys, full of stiu

as such, for by hundreds and thousands.

precious lessons.
The World at School, or Education and Words of Comfort for Parents Bere.

for would

adhering Development.

of little Children. Edited by Wax

ermon, LOGAN.

With an Introduction by the
Biblical Interpretation.

wwed. Rev. WILLIAM ANDERSON, LL.D, Gle

inMiracles : What they are, what they prove,

London: James Nisbet and Co.

gow. and how to prove them.

| 1861. ம THESE are the titles of three of a series THERE are many books for the consolaof " Theological Tracts for the Times,” tion and comfort of the sorrowful; some of published by Mr. Tresidder, of Ave Maria them are very beautiful and very precious, Lane. Written in a free style, they are but few are specially applicable to those popularised so far as such subjects can be who are bereaved of little children. Here made popular; and as they have very we have one,-to our mind, just the book direct reference in their teachings to the to be read and appreciated by a disconso" Essays and Reviews," we hail their ap- late bereaved parent. A treatise on such a pearance with pleasure, feeling assured subject would be ill adapted, however well they will be extensively circulated and pro- conceived and written, to the wants of a ductive of good.

bruised, sorrowing heart. Thoughts, anecVillage Missionaries; or, " to every one passed through the same deep waters would

dotes, and heart-sighs of others who have his Work.” By the author of "Under be more appropriate; and in making a colthe Microscope.” London : T. Nelson lection of such we think Mr. Logan has been and Sons.

very successful. In the poetical department A CHARMING volume, presenting beautiful there is not so much of the Gospel as we pictures of village life-of humble believers could have wished to see ; for after all, mere sanctified and upheld in the midst of afflic-poetry and sentiment, however beautiful, tions and trials by the sustaining power of afford but poor consolation in the vacantthe Gospel of grace. The volume opens chamber, or at the new-made grave. There with a beautiful sketch of an orphan family is more poetry and true consolation for the early bereaved of their earthly guides, but heart of a bereaved Christian mother, in the who were left with the best of all legacies, “ I am the resurrection and the life; be that the early lessons and memories of a godly believeth in me though he were dead yet home. As the title indicates, the great les shall he live," than in all the sweet and sons of the tale are the duty and blessedness beautiful sentiments about “innocence," of living for Christ, of " doing goud as ye and "angels,' and "heaven" that such.

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preached but baptized. These two instances the Session of St. Peter's was laid before are sufficient to prove one of two things, viz., the Presbytery of Lancashire, asking them either

to adjudicate upon a claim made by Mr. 1. That Deacons preached and baptized Smith for arrears of salary. The Presby virtue of their ordination to the diaco- bytery declined to interfere judicially in the nate; or,

matter ; but, “ considering that it might 2. That they preached and baptized with tend to the satisfaction of the parties inout any ordination to the ministry at all. volved,” the members present volunteered

One of these two positions must be to act as friendly referees in the case-in granted.

other words, to give their advice as Chris. If these views be correct, let us not scru- tian brethren—if the parties present were ple to give them effect in our general policy, willing to abide by their judgment. This was and we may yet find that a diaconite, enjoy- agreed to; and the referees, after con. ing more extensive functions according to sidering the case, gave it as their judgment Scriptural precedent, may be the means of “that Mr. Smith had no claim, legal or extending our Church's usefulness in this moral, to arrears of stipend." A very brief land.

report of this, expressed in three sentences, I have the honour to be,

was published as part of the Presbyteries' Yours truly,

report in our October number, last year,

and, so far as we are concerned, this is the AN ENGLISH PRESBYTERIAN.

sum and substance of Mr. Smith's gries.

It was a simple record of facta ;

no opinion was expressed upon the subject. THE REV. WALTER SMITH AND Mr. Smith's statement is a very extra.

ST. PETER'S CONGREGATION, ordinary production. It appears to consist
LIVERPOOL.

of broken sentences, or jottings, as if copied

from a private memorandum-book. We We have received a long letter from the are unwilling to believe that it was originRev. Walter Smith, formerly minister of ally written for publication in our columns. St. Peter's Church, Liverpool, complaining In all sincerity, if not with grief, we say, of a report of the Presbytery of Lancashire, that its publication would do the writer which appeared in our columns in October, far greater “ damage" than the minute of 1860, by the publication of which he “has which he complains. We cannot, therereceived damage,” he says, and therefore fore, afford him the opportunity which he requests the insertion of a counter state- craves of inflicting injury upon himself. ment. Although this “ damage” was done We are well aware that, in the history of to Mr. Smith nearly twelve months ago, he the St. Peter's Congregation, there are seems to have been living in happy igno- painful passages of mismanagement and rance of the fact, until lately he was in. misfortune, of the consequences of which formed of the circumstance by a friend. Mr. Smith had to bear a heavy share ; but Truly, if “ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to it cannot serve the interests of truth or be wise." As for ourselves, we were as igno. justice to publish such a record of these rant as Mr. Smith of the evil we had done misfortunes as Mr. Smith has sent to us; him until we received his letter: and even nor can it be studying "the things that now, we have only the light of this October make for peace” to describe the conduct of minute, and his statement, to inform us members of Presbytery in epithets such as upon the subject. But the facts of the respectable men of the world would not case appear to be these.—About this time venture to apply to one another. last year a memorial from two members of

[Ed. E. P. M.]

Ilutices of Books.

The Twin Brothers.—By WILLIAM An- standing the labours of an arduous calling,

DERSON, Author of " Bethlehem and its Mr, Anderson finds time to produce little Kings,”

," "The Clay House,” &c. Sun- books which cannot fail to be read with derland : J. G. Campbell & Co. London: pleasure and profit by old and young. The Partridge & Co., Paternoster Row.

subject of the “Twin Brothers," is the

difference between the reality and the This is another effusion from the indus- profession of religion. In å narrative trious pen of our literary elder, Notwith- 'ingeniously constructed, Mr. Anderson

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strikingly portrays the hollowness of the have opportunity." It is especially a book one, especially at the close of life, and the for the young, and they will read it with ingrandeur and reality of the other. No terest and profit. reflective person can read the book without Lives made Sublime by Faith and Works. having serious thoughts presented to his mind respecting his own spiritual condi

By the Rev. Robert Steel, Chelten. tion. The interest of the narrative is so

ham, Author of “Samuel the Prophet,” well sustained, that few persons who once

“ Doing Good,” &c. Simpkin, Marshall,

and Co. begin it will rest until they have finished its perusal, while this interest is not ex- In this little volume Mr. Steel presents cited by any unworthy appeal to mere us with brief biographical sketches of fourpassion or sentiment, but by the delineation teen eminent men, most of whom were but of the loftiest themes which can engage the other day adorning the doctrine of Christ our attention as rational and religious in the Church on earth, but who have all beings.

passed away into the enjoyment of the “rest Cassell's Ilustrated Family Bible, with

that remaineth.” Here are a few of the Notes. Vol. II. London: Cassell,

subjects :- -“ Dudley A. Tyng, the Child of Petter, & Galpin.

Prayer;" Ensign Marcus Cheek, the

Young Confessor ;” “James Maitland Hog, The second volume of this noble edition the Christian Gentleman;" "Jonas Sugof the Sacred Scriptures is now before us, den, the Christian Manufacturer ;” “ Wiland is every way equal to the preceding liam Allen, the Christian Chemist;" " Hugh volume, to which, on a former occasion, we Miller, the Christian Geologist,” &c. &c. referred. The profuse and appropriate The narratives are beautifully and faithfully illustrations will make it a favourite amongst written, and they will be read with delight the poor; and we feel assured that if by many whose time and means alike deample facilities were afforded to the mem- prive them of the power of perusing the bers and Sunday scholars of country con original biographies. It is an admirable gregations this Bible would be subscribed book for boys, full of stirring thoughts and for by hundreds and thousands.

precious lessons. The World at School, or Education and Words of Comfort for Parents Bereaved Development.

of little Children. Edited by WILLIAM Biblical Interpretation.

LOGAN.

With an Introduction by the

Rev. WILLIAM ANDERSON, LL.D, GlasMiracles : What they are, what they prove, gow.

London: James Nisbet and Co. and how to prove them.

1861, THESE are the titles of three of a series THERE are many books for the consolaof " Theological Tracts for the Times,” tion and comfort of the sorrowful; some of published by Mr. Tresidder, of Ave Maria them are very beautiful and very precious, Lane. Written in a free style, they are but few are specially applicable to those popularised so far as such subjects can be who are bereaved of little children. Here made popular; and as they have very we have one,-to our mind, just the book direct reference in their teachings to the to be read and appreciated by a discongo

Essays and Reviews,” we hail their ap- late bereaved parent. A treatise on such a pearance with pleasure, feeling assured subject would be ill adapted, however well they will be extensively circulated and pro- conceived and written, to the wants of a ductive of good.

bruised, sorrowing heart. Thoughts, anecVillage Missionaries; or, " to every one passed through the same deep waters would

dotes, and heart-sighs of others who have his Work.” By the author of "Under be more appropriate ; and in making a colthe Microscope.” London : T. Nelson lection of such we think Mr. Logan has been and Sons.

very successful. In the poetical department A CHARMING volume, presenting beautiful there is not so much of the Gospel as we pictures of village life of humble believers could have wished to see ; for after all, mere sanctified and upheld in the midst of afflic- poetry and sentiment, however beautiful, tions and trials by the sustaining power of afford but poor consolation in the vacant the Gospel of grace. The volume opens chamber, or at the new-made grave. There with a beautiful sketch of an orphan family is more poetry and true consolation for the: early bereaved of their earthly guides, but heart of a bereaved Christian mother, in the who were left with the best of all legacies, “ I am the resurrection and the life ; he that the early lessons and memories of a godly believeth in me though he were dead yet home. As the title indicates, the great les shall he live," than in all the sweet and sons of the tale are the duty and blessedness beautiful sentiments about “innocence, of living for Christ, of " doing good as ye and

'angels," and "heaven" that such.

authors as Dickens, Burns, Tennyson, and

“ There was no loveliness in flowers; in human Thomas Moore ever wrote.

eyes, or books;

Dear household faces flitted round with pain'd But the volume contains some pieces pos- and ghastly looks ; sessing great power and beauty, of which A shadow mulled like a mist the splendours

of the day, we would not like to deprive it. Many a

And sorrow speaking to the night took all its parent will read his own experience in the

stars away. following picture of a father's anguish, by James Hedderwick, extracted from his “No more might fair hands fondly smooth the

pillow for his head; Lays of Middle age.”

The joyless task was now all mine to lay him

in his bed : "I never thought of him and death, so far apart

I laid him in his earth-cold bed, and buried they seem'd

with him there The love that would have died to sare, of danger The hope that trembling on its knees expired scarcely dream'd ;

’mid broken prayer.' Too late the fear that prompted help-too late the yearning care;

The Pleading Saviour; or, the Wondrous Yet who that saw his lustrous face could doubt Love of Christ as displayed in His Inthat death would spare ?

tercessory Prayer. By the Rev. JAMES "Oh, could my pangs bave lightened his, or eased

SMITH, Cheltenham. London: T. Nel his failing breath,

son and Sons. I would have drained the bitter cup had every drop been death;

THERE are few more industrious labourers But though I drank his agony antil my heart in the Master's vineyard than the author of o'erflow'd,

this little volume. He furnishes to a greater From off the little sufferer’s breast I could not extent than most men a practical illustra. lift tho load.

tion of the text, “ Freely ye have received, "It weighed him down ; I saw him sink away freely give.” We believe his pen runs freely, from life and me;

and we know he has willingly placed it at Grief waded in the gentlest eyes—my own could the service of many a good, but needy ob

scarcely see : He look'd so calm, he felt so cold-all hope, all ject, as his generous contributions to the life had fled

devotional periodical literature of the day A cry of pain would have been sweet, but pain abundantly testify. He always chooses suititself was dead.

able subjects, and his earnest, devout, im"They took his form of innocence and stretch'd pressive tracts and papers have been useful it out alone;

to thousands of readers. Of this brief exTears fell upon the pulseless clay, like raindrops position of the 17th chapter of John, he

upon stone; They closed bis eyes of beauty, for their glory says there is no attempt to be profound, or was o'ercast,

to pry into the secrets of God, but a simple And sorrow drew its deepest shade from glad- endeavour to comprehend something of the ness that was past.

Saviour's meaning, in order that we may "The sun was lazy in the heavens that day our understand and enjoy more of his love. It darling died,

is a book for believers, rich with comfortAnd longer wore away the night we miss'd him ing assurances and elevating truths.

from our side; All sleep, was scared by weary sobs from one T'he " Essays and Reviews" Examined. By

wild heart and mineThe only sleep in all the house, my innocent !

the Rev. James BUCHANAN, D.D. Edinwas thine.

burgh : Johnstone and Hunter. London:

Nisbet and Co. "I made mad inquest of the skies; I breathed an inward psalm :

Another Gospel" Examined : or, a Popa. The stars burn'd incense at God's feet-I grew more strong and calm :

lar Criticism of each of the Seven Essays I uttered brave and soothing words as was my and Reviews." London: W. Walker and manhood's part,

Co. Then hurried speechlessly away to hide the father's heart,

Observations on the Rev. Dr. Temple's " His coffin crib a soft hand deck'd with flowers Essay on the Education of the World. of sweetest scent;

By the Rev. R. BLAKELOCK. London: To beauty and decay akin their living breath Nisbet and Co.

they lent; But never could they breath impart whence We need not inform our readers how

other breath had flown ;Ah me! affection's helplessness when death has numerous are the publications which have claimed his own!

issued, and still continue to issue, from the

press, in reply to the Oxford “Essays "Our child was now God's holy child, yet still and Reviews." The excitement caused by

he lingered here; Oh, could we but have kept him thus, the pic- too great, and it is not likely soon to sub

the “Essays” has been very great, perhaps tured dust how dear! But soon the grave its summons writ upon the side, for the production of one of the writers black'ning lips,

has brought him into the Ecclesiastical And wheresoe'er I look'd for life I only saw eclipse.

Courts, and it is reported that another (Dr.

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Williams) has been also served with a cita- , themselves and their associates, alike of tion to the Court of Arches. So widely and misery in this world and of eternal destrucgenerally have the “ Essays” been con- tion in the world to come.demned, that the attention of many has been “During the twelve months over which called to them who otherwise might never this lady's exertions have extended, no fewer have heard of their existence. But for the than 250 girls have been reclaimed. Of position which the authors hold in the these, so far as is known, only 20 have National Church the book might have lain relapsed, and of this number several have upon the publisher's shelves for years un- returned in bitter penitence, and are now heeded and unknown.” Now, however, it is doing well. 85 of these girls have been scattered over the length and breadth of the restored to their parents, upwards of 40 land by thousands, and, it is to be feared, are engaged as domestic servants in different has done more in one year to sap the foun- capacities, and the remainder are engaged dations of the faith of many than the now in miscellaneous employments, of whom defunct “Reasoner" of Hollyoake was able about 60 are at present under the care and to do in ten. It was meet, therefore, that supervision of this lady." the bane should be followed by the antidote,

These detached paragraphs, extracted and therefore we cordially welcome any from the introduction, sufficiently explain honest effort that is made to furnish the the nature and objects of this volume. It general reader with a popular treatment of is a volume which may well appear side by the subjects.

side with “Ragged Homes and how to For a calm, thorough, and effective refu. Mend Them," Haste to the Rescue," and tation and exposure of the arguments and similar valuable productions of recent date. sopbistries contained in the Essays, we be- Metrical Lay Sermons. John Snow, Paterlieve nothing that has yet issued from the

noster Row, press can be placed before this little work of Dr. James Buchanan. The substance of

A SOMEWHAT original title, and certainly the work was first contributed in a series of herence to prescribed rule. These sermons

an original book--original even in its adarticles to the Morning Post, but these have

are, in fact, short sacred poems: as such, been considerably extended in the present it might be supposed, the author would volume, which also contains an able Intro

take ductory Chapter on the points of Connec. strictly to the general order of a sermon,

some license, in not adhering tion and Contrast between the two Schools of and such variation might well be allowed. Oxford, as exemplified in the " Tracts for But we have throughout the orthodox inthe Times" and the “Essays and Reviews.” “ Another Gospel" is a very creditable troduction, and the first

, second, and third attempt at a popular criticism of the Essays, parts of a sermon adhered to. Here, howand which, with Mr. Blakelock's “ Obser- ever, the likeness ends ; cach part is in vations” on Dr. Temple's Essay, is well

itself a complete poem, although all bearing worthy of persal. By some readers they The poetry is irregular in quality, but it

on the text or texts heading the “ sermon.' will be better understood, and more highly rarely descends to common place; and here appreciated than the classic language and and there you meet with flashes of original polished arguments of Dr. Buchanan,

thought. There is at all times a great The present number of the Quarterly facility of expression, and often a power of Journal of Prophecy (Nisbet) is chiefly word-painting is exhibited that would alone occupied with a continuation of former repay a perusal. It is a book that may be articles, such " Readings in First taken up in spare moments with pleasure Chronicles," “ The New Jerusalem," and and advantage. Here is a specimen taken the “ Day of the Lord in the Epistles of St. almost at random :Paul.” “ Jewish Thoughts on the Times of the Messiah," and an article entitled, “ Transjordanic Discoveries,” are particu- “It is gone! it is gone! like dream that has larly interesting, and to the general reader

fled ; will repay perusal. The number closes, as

The promise of blessing and pureness that usual, with a few sweet verses from the pen

shone, of the accomplished editor.

When God the fair garden of Paradise The Omnipotence of Loving Kindness.

spread Nisbet & Co.

All brightness and joy. It is gonel it is

gone! " The foļlowing pages lay before their readers an account of the exertions made Gone! all that gave freshness and beauty to by a lady in Glasgow to bring back to the paths of virtue and purity those unhappy The fragrance of love that defied every females whose sinful traffic is productive, to

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