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On one occasion, perceiving in his changed countenance, and labourious breathing, the signs of approaching dissolution, I said to him,

From morn till night, from youth till | unable to do so. She had prayed with hoary age.' him, and instructed him in the way John at length became the subject of salvation. Not only had she been of severe affliction, being confined for mindful of his spiritual condition, but about six months. The complaint had ministered abundantly to the temunder which he laboured, and which poral wants of himself and his family. eventually proved fatal, was dropsy in The attentions of this lady-who was the chest. On hearing of his illness I a Wesleyan-had been greatly blessed went to visit him at his home; which, in promoting his soul's best interests. alas! I found to be one that exhibited, The gratitude and affection he exin its general aspect, those signs of pressed towards her was truly affectpoverty which speak impressively to ing; indeed, his whole soul seemed the heart. He was exceedingly glad filled with love both to God and man. to see me; and, as I had ever been a special favourite from boyhood, I availed myself of the vantage ground which I knew I possessed in John's regards, to endeavour, with all faithfulness and affection, to convince him of his awful condition as a sinner, and to point him to "the Lamb of God" as the divinely appointed, and only possible means of escaping "the damnation of hell," and of attaining "everlasting life." During this, and subsequent interviews, poor John listened to my remarks with the most earnest attention, combined with the docility of a little child. He soon began to join with fervour in prayer, and deep impressions seemed to be made on his mind.

By the occurrence of circumstances, over which I had no control, my course of visits was interrupted, so that I was unable to see him for six or seven weeks. The next time I went, we had a most affecting meeting. I found him greatly changed since we last met, and he appeared to be rapidly nearing his journey's end. After I had been seated a little while by his bedside, I made some observations respecting the power of Christian principle to sustain the mind under the pressure of affliction, and to cheer it even in the prospect of death. As I spoke, the big tears began to roll down poor John's cheeks, and he exclaimed, with deep emotion, "Blessed Jesus! Blessed Jesus!"

"I hope, John," I said, "you have found him to be your Saviour ?" "Yes," he replied, "I certainly have. Bless his name!"

He then began to tell me of the kindness of a Christian lady in the neighbourhood, who had visited him regularly during the period I had been

"Well, John, you now appear to be drawing very near your end; will you answer me, as in the presence of God, one or two questions ?"

"Yes, sir, that I will."

"Do you really think that you have seen the sinfulness of your own heart and conduct in such a light as to feel yourself a poor lost sinner, justly exposed to the wrath of God?"

"Yes, sir," he replied, "I have seen my great sinfulness. I am very sorry for it. I am a poor lost sinner-a lost sinner! 39

"Do you think, John, that your sorrow for sin arises merely from a fear of punishment; or from some sense of your rebellion, neglect, and ingratitude towards God?"

"I am sorry, sir, from the deep sense have of how wrong I have acted."

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I
'Feeling your guilt and danger, do
you come to God as a condemned sin-
ner, depending entirely on his mercy,
as bestowed through the atoning sacri-
fice of Jesus Christ?"

"Ay, sir, that I do. Christ is the sinner's only hope. Blessed Jesus! Blessed Jesus!"

"Do you think, John, that Christ is able and willing to save you? And can you rely upon him with undoubting confidence?"

Ay, sir, I can. I assure you I do. I believe I have got something within," laying his hand on his breast, " which will never get out."

"Why, then, John, I should think it is eternal life.' 'Whosoever shall drink of the water that I shall give

ushered into eternity. His hymn of praise had scarcely arisen before his Father's throne, than he was called up thither to join in a nobler and heavenlier song. Here is an illustration of the blessedness of religion. If we have religion in our hearts, our existence in the present world is but a preparation for our existence in the future, and our mortal death is but the entrance to immortal life.

My dear children, you all want to be happy, and we wish to make you so, and therefore point you to religion, where happiness only is to be found; for "her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace." The first step in religion, we have told you, is reconciliation with God; do you, then, seek to be reconciled to him. Weak and sinful as you are, if you repent and forsake your sins, he will receive you; he will be your eternal friend, and will "guide you by his counsel, and afterwards receive you to glory."

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MEMOIRS OF ANN CLOWES,

LEEK, STAFFORDSHIRE. ANN CLOWES was favoured with pious parents, and thus, from her infancy, had the advantages of instruction, example, and prayers,-advantages which the young cannot too highly value. Their influence was seen in her strict regard to truth, and willing compliance with all which she was required by her parents to do. In early life she was deprived of a father's care; but the same conscientiousness and obedience, even in the most trivial matters, were always manifested by her. There was all in her temper and conduct to lead her widowed mother to hope that she was not far from the kingdom of God." She showed an unwavering attachment to the services of his house, and on no account, except by needful business, would she be absent from them. Such was her conviction of God's supreme right to dispose of us as he please, that she would say, "If it be the Lord's will we should die, I don't think it is right we should be anxious to live."

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While anticipating years of mutual enjoyment and usefulness, a change in her health was obvious. Means were immediately used for her recovery; but all were in vain. The time of her departure to a better country—that is, an heavenly-was at hand. A removal to a milder air was tried; and while she was at Boden, in Cheshire, her minister wrote her a letter, expressing his concern for her spiritual welfare, and his desire to know that she had "chosen the good part."

It was not till after this time-for she soon returned home to die that her mother learned the state of her soul, as she always seemed unwilling to converse on the subject. Now the most serious and earnest inquiry was made, when she said to her: "I cannot recollect when I had not at times a desire to live unto the Lord. Many times, while Mr. Goshawk has been preaching, and while I have been at the Lord's Supper (as a spectator), I have been affected to tears; but, oh! I have gone back, and have not given God my heart; that is the cause of my grief. It is not the fear of hell, though I know I deserve it; but it is because I have not given God my heart." Her mother replied: "You know, then, you are a sinner, do you, and need a Saviour." "Oh, yes; and I wish I had been decided sooner. I have been more determined since Mr. Goshawk wrote to me while I was at Boden." After her return home, her minister gave her James's "Anxious Inquirer,” which was read to her, and conversed upon by her mother; and while doing so, the departed rejoiced and wept, and said, "I always thought it was in this way; but still I thought it was too easy for such a blessing to be obtained." She then fell on her knees, praising God for what he had done for her, and implored his blessing to rest on her sisters.

Life was now desired only that she might be useful in directing souls to Christ; and especially that she might promote the spiritual well-being of her sisters, and of her class at the Sundayschool: but this desire was not granted. "A good hope through grace" sustained and consoled her amidst a se

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vere affliction; and, except when harassed by temptation, gave her joy and peace even in the prospect of eternity. About a fortnight before her departure she said to her mother, How shall I let you know that I am happy at last; I mean when I am dying?" It was agreed that she should give to each a parting kiss, and express her happiness at the solemn period by raising her hand.

The symptoms of approaching dissolution were soon more obvious. Pain became so intense a day or two before that event, that she was deprived of rest, and speech gradually failed. "Christ will work, till of life's sinful stain No spot or wrinkle on the soul remain." Thus, when in great suffering a few hours before her death, she looked at her mother, saying, "The Lord does not pity me yet, mother;" who replied, "Heaven is a holy place, my child, perhaps you are not pure enough yet; he will take you to himself just at the right time." At hearing this, she exclaimed, "Oh, that I had breath to praise him! Oh, that I had breath to

praise him! He is always in my heart. He is always in my heart." While all were expecting her last gasp, with an anxious look she showed her desire for their farewell token; and then, with uplifted hands, expressing her "full assurance of hope," absent from the body, her soul was present with the Lord. The young are especially entreated to lay this to heart, and think

""Tis not the whole of life to live,

Nor all of death to die." There is another state; and it is only by an immediate, entire devotedness to Christ, that the life which now is can really be enjoyed, and that which is to come be welcomed with delight. Inquire, then, whether you are on his side. If not, it must be "a cause of grief," either in this world or the next, that you did not from your childhood believe his truth, and love his service. Trifle not with the convictions which you have of the privilege and necessity of personal piety; but repent and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, and your souls, by the Holy Spirit, be made meet for heaven. Give your

selves first to the Lord, and then to his people, in church-fellowship, according to his will. The least delay is unwise, and injurious, and it may be ruinous. Dec. 1847. O. P. Q.

Let me, then,

BE READY TO DIE! SUCH, my dear children, was the exhortation of the blessed Saviour when on earth. You, no doubt, have often read it, and heard it from your teachers and ministers, and possibly this remarks they have made upon it may, in some degree, have impressed it upon your minds. In a few cases the Spirit of God may have so deepened the impression, that you have been led to seek that preparation, without which none can enter the kingdom of heaven; while in others it has been as the morning cloud and the early dew, which soon passeth away. again call your attention to it, and apply it by the solemn warnings which God are taking place around us. speaks by his providence as well as his word. Two or three sabbaths ago, a number of persons were breaking the sabbath by sailing, rowing, and bathing in the river close by, when one of them was drowned. He left his home in the morning in health and strength, and was pursuing his pleasure on God's holy day, when he was suddenly and unexpectedly summoned into the presence of his Judge to render in his account. Thus saying to every sabbathbreaker, "Be ye also ready; for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh." But they heeded not the voice of warning, they continued to follow their evil ways, and last sabbath God again spake to them. In the same place two young men were rowing in a boat, intending to bathe; the boat was upset, and one of them sunk and was taken out dead.

The one taken, and the other left. Oh, what awful warnings are these! How loudly do they speak to us," Be ye also ready; for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh."

During the past week, God has more especially spoken to you in our own school. Your schoolfellow, J— G—, was here in his place on Thursday

ushered into eternity. His hymn of praise had scarcely arisen before his Father's throne, than he was called up thither to join in a nobler and heavenlier song. Here is an illustration of the blessedness of religion. If we have religion in our hearts, our existence in the present world is but a preparation for our existence in the future, and our mortal death is but the entrance to immortal life.

My dear children, you all want to be happy, and we wish to make you so, and therefore point you to religion, where happiness only is to be found; for "her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace." The first step in religion, we have told you, is reconciliation with God; do you, then, seek to be reconciled to him. Weak and sinful as you are, if you repent and forsake your sins, he will receive you; he will be your eternal friend, and will " guide you by his counsel, and afterwards receive you to glory."

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MEMOIRS OF ANN CLOWES,

LEEK, STAFFORDSHIRE. ANN CLOWES was favoured with pious parents, and thus, from her infancy, had the advantages of instruction, example, and prayers,-advantages which the young cannot too highly value. Their influence was seen in her strict regard to truth, and willing compliance with all which she was required by her parents to do. In early life she was deprived of a father's care; but the same conscientiousness and obedience, even in the most trivial matters, were always manifested by her. There was all in her temper and conduct to lead her widowed mother to hope that she was "not far from the kingdom of God." She showed an unwavering attachment to the services of his house, and on no account, except by needful business, would she be absent from them. Such was her conviction of God's supreme right to dispose of us as he please, that she would say, "If it be the Lord's will we should die, I don't think it is right we should be anxious to live."

While anticipating years of mutual enjoyment and usefulness, a change in her health was obvious. Means were immediately used for her recovery; but all were in vain. The time of her departure to a better country—that is, an heavenly-was at and. A removal to a milder air was tried; and while she was at Boden, in Cheshire, her minister wrote her a letter, expressing his concern for her spiritual welfare, and his desire to know that she had "chosen the good part."

It was not till after this time-for she soon returned home to die-that her mother learned the state of her soul, as she always seemed unwilling to converse on the subject. Now the most serious and earnest inquiry was made, when she said to her: "I cannot recollect when I had not at times a desire to live unto the Lord. Many times, while Mr. Goshawk has been preaching, and while I have been at the Lord's Supper (as a spectator), I have been affected to tears; but, oh! I have gone back, and have not given God my heart; that is the cause of my grief. It is not the fear of hell, though I know I deserve it; but it is because I have not given God my heart." Her mother replied: "You know, then, you are a sinner, do you, and need a Saviour." "Oh, yes; and I wish I had been decided sooner. I have been more determined since Mr. Goshawk wrote to me while I was at Boden." After her return home, her minister gave her James's "Anxious Inquirer,” which was read to her, and conversed upon by her mother; and while doing so, the departed rejoiced and wept, and said, "I always thought it was in this way; but still I thought it was too easy for such a blessing to be obtained." She then fell on her knees, praising God for what he had done for her, and implored his blessing to rest on her sisters.

Life was now desired only that she might be useful in directing souls to Christ; and especially that she might promote the spiritual well-being of her sisters, and of her class at the Sundayschool: but this desire was not granted. "A good hope through grace" sustained and consoled her amidst a se

vere affliction; and, except when ha- | selves first to the Lord, and then to his rassed by temptation, gave her joy and people, in church-fellowship, according peace even in the prospect of eternity. to his will. The least delay is unwise, About a fortnight before her departure and injurious, and it may be ruinous. she said to her mother, "How shall I Dec. 1847. O. P. Q. let you know that I am happy at last; I mean when I am dying?" It was agreed that she should give to each a parting kiss, and express her happiness at the solemn period by raising her hand.

BE READY TO DIE! SUCH, my dear children, was the exhortation of the blessed Saviour when on earth. You, no doubt, have often The symptoms of approaching disso-read it, and heard it from your teachlution were soon more obvious. Pain became so intense a day or two before that event, that she was deprived of rest, and speech gradually failed. "Christ will work, till of life's sinful stain No spot or wrinkle on the soul remain." Thus, when in great suffering a few hours before her death, she looked at her mother, saying, "The Lord does

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not pity me yet, mother;" who replied,
"Heaven is a holy place, my child,
perhaps you are not pure enough yet;
he will take you to himself just at the
right time." At hearing this, she ex-
claimed,
Oh, that I had breath to
praise him! Oh, that I had breath to
praise him! He is always in my heart.
He is always in my heart."
were expecting her last gasp, with an
anxious look she showed her desire for
their farewell token; and then, with
uplifted hands, expressing her "full as-
surance of hope," absent from the body,
her soul was present with the Lord.
The young are especially entreated
to lay this to heart, and think-

While all

""Tis not the whole of life to live,
Nor all of death to die."

There is another state; and it is only
by an immediate, entire devotedness
to Christ, that the life which now is
can really be enjoyed, and that which
is to come be welcomed with delight.
Inquire, then, whether you are on his
side. If not, it must be "a cause of
grief," either in this world or the next,
that you did not from your childhood
believe his truth, and love his service.
Trifle not with the convictions which
you have of the privilege and necessity
of personal piety; but repent and be
converted, that
may be blotted
out, and your souls, by the Holy Spirit,
be made meet for heaven. Give your

your sins

ers and ministers, and possibly this re-
marks they have made upon it may, in
some degree, have impressed it upon
your minds. In a few cases the Spirit
of God may have so deepened the im-
pression, that you have been led to
seek that preparation, without which
none can enter the kingdom of heaven;
while in others it has been as the morn-

ing cloud and the early dew, which
soon passeth away. Let me, then,
again call your attention to it, and
apply it by the solemn warnings which
God
are taking place around us.
speaks by his providence as well as his
word. Two or three sabbaths ago, a
number of persons were breaking the
sabbath by sailing, rowing, and bath-
ing in the river close by, when one of
them was drowned. He left his home
in the morning in health and strength,
and was pursuing his pleasure on God's
holy day, when he was suddenly and
unexpectedly summoned into the pre-
sence of his Judge to render in his ac-
count. Thus saying to every sabbath-
breaker, "Be ye also ready; for in such
an hour as ye think not the Son of
man cometh." But they heeded not the
voice of warning, they continued to
follow their evil ways, and last sabbath
God again spake to them. In the same
place two young men were rowing in a
boat, intending to bathe; the boat was
upset, and one of them sunk and was
taken out dead. The one taken, and
the other left. Oh, what awful warn-
ings are these! How loudly do they
speak to us,-" Be ye also ready; for
in such an hour as ye think not the
Son of man cometh."

During the past week, God has more especially spoken to you in our own school. Your schoolfellow, J- Gwas here in his place on Thursday

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