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A TREATY

BETWEEN THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

AND THE

TRIBES OF INDIANS

CALLED THE

SIX NATIONS.

THE

HE Prefident of the United States having determined to hold a conference with the Six Nations of Indians, for the purpose of removing from their minds all caufes of complaint, and establishing a firm and permanent friendship with them; and Timothy Pickering being appointed fole agent for that purpose; and the agent having met and conferred with the Sachems, Chiefs and Warriors of the Six Nations, in a general council: Now, in order to accomplish the good defign of this conference, the parties have agreed on the following articles; which, when ratified by the Prefident, with the advice and confent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on them and the Six Nations.

ARTICLE I.

Peace and friendship are hereby firmly efta- Peace and blished, and shall be perpetual, between the friendship United States and the Six Nations. perpetual.

ARTICLE II.

cured to

The United States acknowledge the lands Certain reserved to the Oneida, Onondaga and Cay- lands feuga Nations, in their respective treaties with Indians. the state of New-York, and called their refervations, to be their property; and the United

Boundary of lands

Nation.

States will never claim the fame, nor disturb them or either of the Six Nations, nor their Indian friends refiding thereon and united with them, in the free ufe and enjoyment thereof: but the faid refervations fhall remain theirs, until they choose to fell the fame to the people of the United States, who have the right to purchase.

ARTICLE III.

The land of the Seneka nation is bounded belonging as follows: Beginning on Lake Ontario, at to Seneka the north-weft corner of the land they fold to Oliver Phelps, the line runs wefterly along the lake, as far as O-yong-wong-yeh Creek, at Johnfon's Landing-place, about four miles eastward from the fort of Niagara; then foutherly up that creek to its main fork, then ftraight to the main fork of Stedman's creek, which empties into the river Niagara, above fort Schloffer, and then onward, from that fork, continuing the fame ftraight course, to that river; (this line, from the mouth of Oyong-wong-yeh Creek to the river Niagara, above fort Schloffer, being the eastern boundary of a strip of land, extending from the fame line to Niagara river, which the Seneka nation ceded to the King of Great-Britain, at a treaty held about thirty years ago, with Sir William Johnson;) then the line runs along the river Niagara to Lake Erie; then along Lake Erie to the north-east corner of a triangular piece of land which the United States conveyed to the state of Pennfylvania, as by the Prefident's patent, dated the third day of March, 1792; then due fouth to the northern boundary of that ftate; then due eaft to the fouth-west corner of the land fold by the Seneka nation to Oliver Phelps; and then north

and northerly, along Phelps's line, to the place of beginning on Lake Ontario. Now, the United States acknowledge all the land within the aforementioned boundaries, to be the property of the Seneka nation; and the United States will never claim the fame, nor difturb the Seneka nation, nor any of the Six Nations, or of their Indian friends refiding thereon and united with them, in the free ufe and enjoyment thereof: but it shall remain theirs, until they choose to fell the fame to the people of the United States, who have the right to purchase.

ARTICLE IV.

never to

lands in the

The United States having thus described and acknowledged what lands belong to the Six Nations Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas and Senekas, claim other and engaged never to claim the fame, nor to boundaries disturb them, or any of the Six Nations, or of U. S. their Indian friends refiding thereon and united with them, in the free ufe and enjoyment thereof: Now, the Six Nations, and each of them, hereby engage that they will never claim any other lands within the boundaries of the United States; nor ever disturb the people of the United States in the free ufe and enjoyment thereof.

ARTICLE V.

make a

road gran

The Seneka nation, all others of the Six Nations concurring, cede to the United States Right to the right of making a waggon road from Fort Schloffer to Lake Erie, as far fouth as Buffa- tcd, & pafloe Creek; and the people of the United lands, &c. fage thro' States fhall have the free and undisturbed ufe of this road, for the purposes of travelling and transportation. And the Six Nations, and each of them, will forever allow to the people of the United States, a free paffage through

Prefent, &

their lands, and the free ufe of the harbours and rivers adjoining and within their respective tracts of land, for the paffing and fecuring of veffels and boats, and liberty to land their cargoes where neceffary for their fafety.

ARTICLE VI.

In confideration of the peace and friendannuity. fhip hereby established, and of the engagements entered into by the Six Nations; and because the United States defire, with humanity and kindness, to contribute to their comfortable fupport; and to render the peace and friendship hereby established, strong and perpetual; the United States now deliver to the Six Nations, and the Indians of the other nations refiding among and united with them, a quantity of goods of the value of ten thoufand dollars. And for the fame confiderations, and with a view to promote the future welfare of the Six Nations, and of their Indian friends aforefaid, the United States will add the fum of three thousand dollars to the one thousand five hundred dollars, heretofore allowed them by an article ratified by the Prefident, on the twenty-third day of April, 1792; making in the whole, four thousand five hundred dollars; which shall be expended yearly forever, in purchafing cloathing, domeftic animals, implements of husbandry, and other utenfils fuited to their circumftances, and in compenfating ufeful artificers, who fhall refide with or near them, and be employed for their benefit. The immediatè application of the whole annual allowance now ftipulated, to be made by the fuperintendant appointed by the Prefident for the affairs of the Six Nations, and their Indian friends aforefaid.

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