Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

P. 159, Appendix, Table V.) (P. 157, Radcliffe.) (Radcliffe, p. 30.) (Radcliffe, p. 28.)

MANAGEMENT.

"6 AUDI ALTERAM PARTEM."

To the Editor of the Odd-Fellows' Magazine.

Sir,-On reading Mr. Charles Hardwick's article upon Management, &c., in your October number, I think, in his endeavours to expose the disadvantages of the Office Clubs, he has rather overstepped the strict bounds of fellowship, by advising the working man not to accept the independent and disinterested advice and assistance in the practical management of their financial concerns. The absence of this aid has indeed been too frequently the cause of ruin to so many clubs, leading them the prey of interested members. All societies, from the humble club to the House of Peers, require for their own true stability a mixture of interests and sympathies; and is it not the daily effort of the intelligent public to infuse more popular elements into their House of Commons, and for a very wise purpose, to destroy the very object which Mr. Hardwick is anxious to promote in his house of parliamentnamely, classism and se fish ideas? I think that all Benefit Societies should seek and cultivate a lively cordiality with all classes, and promote those principles of friendship, love, and truth, which have been with honest pride the boast of your Order particularly.

The universality of Odd-Fellowship is only rivalled by the Freemasons; and it is to be regretted that so little advantage has been taken of it by the Bre hren to make them more public; out of the lodge room they become dormant and listless. With Masonry, on the contrary, it is ever active in all places and with al men, no matter what their position, so long as they are honest.

In my daily life I always endeavour to promote the welfare of Benefit Societies, and it is frequently done in the face of many annoyances and unjust reflections. Yours, in good fellowship,

A TRUSTEE.

Southwood, November, 1858. The above letter was sent by the Editor to Mr. Hardwick, from whom the following reply has been received:

To the Editor of the Odd-Fellows' Magazine.

Manchester, November 25th, 1858. Sir, I have perused the note of "A Trustee." He altogether misunderstands me if he conceives that I "advise the working man not to accept the independent and disinterested advice and assistance in the practical management of their financial concerns," of (I suppose he means, for he does not state) the upper classes. I think I may, without egotism, assert that I have done as much as any other Odd-Fellow to procure the countenance and approval of the middle and upper classes to our institution and similar Societies; and I am happy to say I have by no means been unsuccessful in my efforts. What I desire is that the financial members should retain their authority over that which is their own, and not hand themselves over to the mercies, (tender or otherwise) of any class or party. In my estimation, one of the most valuable results of Odd Fellowship is the practical education which its self government gives, and this I would preserve at any cost. It is easy to talk about "independent and disinterested advice and assistance," but to distingu sh it from its counterfeit is not always the easiest of ta-ks. All profess disinterestedness who give advice, but ulterior results do not always endorse the profession The administration of public trusts in England presents no very encouraging picture; but, if the reverse were the case, the self-government of these societies is in itself too valuable to be ex

changed even for the most perfect and honourable foreign administration. I find this to be the opinion of many of our best friends amongst the middle and upper classes; men who wish to develop the true manhood of the people, and not to simply train them to political or social docility. The laws and principles of Odd-Fellowship ignore no man's right to advise and assist; but they very wisely confine its honours and authority to those who have earned it by actual labour amongst themselves. If any gentleman feels disposed to give "independent practical advice and assistance," the road is perfectly open; nay, he is actually invited to enter. Let him do as I and scores of others have done become a subscribing member, and doubtless his superior talent and command of leisure will speedily be appreciated. Odd Fellowship is essentially a self-dependent provident institution, and self dependence cannot hang pendant from external patronage, however distinguished.

I am, yours respectfully,

CHARLES HARDWICK, P.G.M. P.S.-I know several clergymen and professional gentlemen who have done, or are now doing, the routine of lodge duty. I think, Mr Editor, you informed me a short time ago that you had harnessed yourself to the car of practical Odd Fellowship, and had become secretary to your lodge. This is the true

course.

EXTENSION OF BENEFITS.

Brother John Bannister, of the Loyal Patience Lodge, Chorley --in a letter for which we regret we can find no room-suggests that, instead of members of our Order joining other Friendly Societies, they might be allowed to pay double subscriptions and obtain double benefits. This is a question that might be properly submitted to the delegates at the next A.M.C.-ED.

BROTHER J. T. SMITH, MAYOR OF MELBOURNE.

On the occasion of the visit of this gentleman to England, the G.M. and Board of Directors, having heard that he took great interest in the working of the Order in Victoria, Australia, determined to invite him to a dinner at head quarters. The invitation was forwarded accordingly, and the following correspondence ensued:

London, Morley's Hotel,

Dear Sir and Brother, November 9th, 1858. I have to acknowledge your very kind note inviting me to visit Manchester and dine with the Board of Directors. I regret much, as I leave London on Thursday next on my return to Melbourne, that I am precluded from enjoying your hospitality. Be kind enough to convey to the Board the assurance of my sincere gratification at the proffered hospitality.

Believe me very fraternally yours, J. T. SMITH, M.L.A., To Henry Ratcliffe, Esq. Mayor of Melbourne. On receiving the above, Messrs. Aitken, Daynes, and Hardwick were appointed to prepare an address of congratulation on Brother Smith's visit to this country. The following address, engrossed, was afterwards laid before the Board, and having been signed by the officers of the Order, was forwarded to London :

"To J. T. Smith, Esq., M.L.A., and Mayor of Melbourne. "Honoured Sir, and Brother,

"We, the officers of the Manchester Unity Independent Order of Odd-Fellows and Board of Directors, beg to congratulate you on your visit to the mother country.

"We are exceedingly happy to know that you take an active part in all that concerns the well-being of our Order, and hope you may long be spared to support the benevolent principles of our constitution, laws, and lectures of our extensive Society.

"Be pleased to convey to our Brethren at the antipodes how pleased we are to know that, although so far from us, they so cheerfully carry out everything that can tend to the consolidation and extension of the Independent Order.

"In bidding our shores farewell-it may be for ever, we hope you may arrive safely at your distant home; and, in your future journey through life, that you and yours may enjoy all the happiness this world can afford. "We remain, yours fraternally, on behalf of the M.U.,

WILLIAM ALEXANDER, G.M.
WILLIAM HIKTON, D.G.M.
CHARLES HARDWICK, P.G.M.
SAMUEL DAYNES, P.G.M.
HENRY BUCK, PROV. C.S.
JAMES ROE, P.G.M.

JOHN SCHOFIELD, P.G.M.

REV. THOMAS PRICE, P. PROV. G.M.
BENJAMIN STREET, P.G.M.

WILLIAM AITKEN, P. PROV. G.M.
JOHN GALE, P. PROV. G.M.

JOSEPH WOODCOCK, P. PROV. G.M. HENRY RATCLIFFE, Corresponding Secretary. "Manchester, November 10th, 1858."

LIVERPOOL NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE.-At the meeting of this important association, held in October last at the St. George's Hall, Liverpool, Mr. Charles Hardwick, P.G.M., by invitation from the central committee, read a paper upon "Friendly or Benefit Societies, their errors, and the means of improvement." Mr. Hardwick's sentiments on this subject are well known to the readers of our Magazine. He entered at length into the discussion of the principal points at issue between the patrons of "office clubs" versus the selfgoverned bodies, and contended that the true duty of the upper classes was to aid by their countenance, and by the diffusion of sound information on the subject of finance in a popular form, the efforts of the provident and industrious portion of the community, but to leave management and the practical details in the hands of the members themselves. The paper, which was well received and listened to with marked attention, was read in the section devoted to subjects having relation to "Social Economy," Sir James Stephen occupying the chair.

STATISTICS OF THE NORTH LONDON DISTRICT.

December 14, 1838.

To the Editor of the Old-Fellows' Magazine. Sir,-Will you please to find a corner, in the next issue of the Magazine, for the annexed return. By so doing, you will perhaps assist in disabusing the minds of our members of the slander too carelessly thrown on Benefit Societies by the Times of yesterday. I am aware that it is not always easy to answer the sophistical arguments which appear in that paper; but all men possessing an average of common sense will admit that a plain statement of facts like those accompanying this note, are worth all the ifs and supposes which the scribblers to the Times have caused to be inserted therein. I am, Sir, yours truly,

JAMES ROE,

Secretary to the North London District. M.U. A Return is issued to the Lodges of the North London District, shewing the income and expenditure of the Sick and Funeral Funds for the year

1857. Seven Lodges have not supplied Returns, as called for, and have caused delay in publishing. Sixty-four Lodges numbering 6483 members, have forwarded Returns to the District Secretary, and the following is the result:

[blocks in formation]

Increase by Income over Expenditure in 60 Lodges..
From which deduct Expenditure over income in 4 Lodges...

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

£ S. d.

3633 17 6

67 11 01

3566 6 51

36,807 8 0

TOTAL-Capital of Sick and Funeral Funds of 64 Lodges £40,373 14 6

PRESENTATIONS AND ANNIVERSARIES.

ABERDARE DISTRICT.-Presentation to a Young Lady.-On Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1858, the members of the Sunnybank Lodge, with many visitors, met for the purpose of presenting the daughter of the Rev. Thomas Price with a mark of their esteem, a large Family Bible, bound in the most costly manner, on the corners of which, in gold letters, was the following inscription: "This Bible was presented to Miss Emily Price by the Sunnybank Lodge, I.O.F., for eminent services rendered by her father, the Rev. Thomas Price, P.P.G.M., of the Aberdare District, to the above lodge, 1858." The presentation was made by D. Thomas, P.P.G.M.; and Miss Price returned thanks in some Welsh stanzas, one of which we give for the benefit of our Welsh friends,—

Meistr cadeirydd, ac anwyl gyfeillion,
Cyflwynaf fy niolch o eigion fy nghalon,
I chwi oll, aelodau Cyfrinfa Bryn Heulog,
Am anrheg mor werthfawr, a thlws mor odidog,
Sef Beibl, yr hwn yw ewyllys y Duwdod,

I fydaid o fodau, sy'n gorwedd mewn pechod.

The meeting was afterwards addressed by her father, the three district officers, P.P.G. Masters, Jones, and Botting; Lewis, Thomas, Morgan, and Jones;-all testifying to the services which called for this expression of their regard by the members of the lodge.

ABERSYCHAN, PONTYPOOL DISTRICT.-On the evening of Wednesday, 25th August, the members of the Union Lodge, and of various lodges of the district, assembled at the house of Mr. David Nicholas, Union Inn, Abersychan, for the purpose of presenting P.P.G.M. William Fisher with a small token of respect for his valuable services to the Union Lodge and Pontypool District. Prov. C.S. Thomas was called to the chair, and P.P.G.M. Joseph Ellis acted as vice-chairman. The chairman, after a few compli

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »