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SOUTHWARK BRIDGE (11 S. ix. 286).--MR. ALECK ABRAHAMS says at the above reference

Notes on Books that “the bridge will disappear unregretted and unsung. If your correspondent will

LONDON. look in Mr. J. Ashby-Sterry's last volume, London. By Sir Laurence Gomme. (Williams & * The River Rhymer,' he will find the latter

Norgate, 7s.6d. net.) condition is assuredly unfulfilled. At p. 230 London Survivals. By P. H. Ditchfield. (Methuen he will discover a charming lyrical picture of & Co., 108. 6d. net.) the bridge and its surroundings in its last Works on London and its surroundings multiply days, as well as ample reference to the apace. Only the other week we reviewed two interesting Dickensian associations books on Chelsea, and to-day we have these further nected with it. I observe, however, that the contributions to the history of London.

Anything written by Sir Laurence Gomme on Rhymer makes no allusion to the steamboat London is sure to receive a hearty welcome. In pier which years ago was attached to one of his book on * The Governance of London' (1907) the buttresses of the bridge. DUMPS. he dealt with a newly discovered aspect of the

question of origins; in “The Making of London,' ANNOUNCEMENTS IN NEWSPAPER OFFICE published in 1912, he attempted to apply the results WINDOWS (11 S. ix. 508).—Following this of this study to the evolution of the city; and in this statement of my friend MR. ALECK ÅBRA- his latest book he deals with a part of the subject HAMS, it may be mentioned that, whatever is previous works, and claims to have discovered the

which is only incidentally touched upon in the two the custom in this country, in Paris the news- great fact of historical continuity-conscious and papers continue to give full reports of news effective continuity-underlying the main issues in their windows as it arrives. For instance, of London life throughout all its changes. As the the Matin, a journal of large circulation, result of his investigations he maintains that “the with offices in a prominent position in the Londinium, is carried through the hundred years

continuity springs from the city-state of Roman French capital, has crowds all day outside, of historical silence, is handed on to the London reading the many messages displayed, and of Anglo-Saxon times, proceeds through the great inspecting the pictures also on view of period of Plantagenet rule, runs deep down under topical events and persons.

the preponderating mass of Tudor and Stuart

changes, and comes out in the open when the J. LANDFEAR LUCAS.

Georgian statesmanship broke away the blocking

forces.” OLD ETONIANS : (7) RICHARD CALVERT

Sir Laurence acknowledges that “the con(11 S. ix. 489). — I should think the Calverts tinuity thus revealed is not unchanging throughmentioned were connected with the Calverts out the centuries. Each age modities its form ; of Albury, Brent Pelham, and Furneaux or rather its form is modified by the different Pelham, Herts.

forces which Chauncy states that the

have constantly worked

upop

it”; but he asserts that “the ideal of conCalverts of Herts were a branch of the tinuity comes from Roman London and from ancient family of the Calverts of Lancashire. Roman Augusta, and it has never lost touch with Many of the Calverts are buried in Albury the realities. Each age has possessed the feeling Church vault.

M.A.

for continuity, has expressed itself in terms

belonging to itself. It is only the terms which THE GREAT EASTERN, THE FIRST OF THE

have been altered .... The material was different, LEVIATHANS (11 S. viii. 506 ; ix. 55, 116, but the undying ideal was always the same."

The author is aware that there will be opposi158, 298).—See The Illustrated Times, 1859, tion to such a point of view, and an opposition in which, especially in the July-December not easy to meet, coming as it does from “the volume, are many interesting prints and schools which have so long been dominated by much letterpress.

the sweeping generalities of Freeman and his

followers." He says that the story he has to tell PALLAVICINI : JANE CROMWELL (11 S. ix. “ differs altogether from that hitherto told," for 270, 314, 375, 435, 511). At the last refer- it includes masses of material which have until

now been ignored. In the present work he has ence a reply of mine appeared in which I

but one word to say about the tradition of said, concerning the epitaph of Horacio London " ; he could not omit this from his Pallavicine, The following is an exact evidence, and he could not complete it, for it will copy." As it appears it is not exact. make a book by itself, and we are glad to know This is probably owing to some accident the text of the present work a summary sufficient

that he means to publish it soon. He gives in or to faulty type. The last two lines of for immediate purposes, expressing a conviction the epitaph should read :

that “the completed study will satisfy many that
the position he takes up for London is historically

sound."
ROBERT PIERPOINT.

The last chapter, The Greatness that is

London,' refers to its magnificent development, [The type was correctly set, but two or three which has never been at the bidding of outside leiters were broken during printing.)

forces, for its whole_history shows it to be a

BEING OF THE AGE OF SIX

AND THIRTY YEARES.

living organism at every stage of its exhausting We must leave the author's readers to ramble life.' “ Neither inonarch nor noble has had a with him through the pre-Reformation churches, hand in its making." Whatever the future may the churches built by Wren, the Inns of Court, the bring, London, the author predicts, will be the City Palaces, and the Halls of the Companies, centre, as she has been the centre all these cen- and we feel sure that they, like ourselves, will find turies, of the new institutions which will come into enjoyment in doing so. existence. It will not be a small uncared-for London, not a London shrinking within its walls, Bannockburn. By John E. Morris. A Centenary and commanding nothing but the fragments of its Monograph. (Cambridge University Press, 58. former greatness—the greatness that was London. net.) She will be a great London with a territorium We have great pleasure in recommending this stretching from the Thames to the sea (we hope monograph alike to historical students and to not), endowed with powers of self-government general readers who are interested in mediaval within the empire to which she belongs.'

warfare and in the battle of Bannockburn in parThere are twenty-four illustrations. We much ticular. wish that the compiling of the Index had been eagerness the work done by Mr. Mackenzie in

Dr. Morris has assimilated with some more thorough.

elucidating the puzzles presented by the ordi. Mr. Ditchfield, in a series of pleasant rambles, nary accounts of the battle. Not all modern takes us through the quaint streets of the City, experts on the question will agree with him, but and points out the treasures of beauty and we must confess that on the all-important question antiquity that still survive. The wanderings do of the real site of the battle he seems to us to make not extend far beyond the demesne of the Cor- out an incontrovertible case for the theory which he poration, and most of the illustrations (114 in and Mr. Mackenzie hold. This is to the effect that number) by Mr. E. L. Wratten have been the fighting took place not on the upland, but on sketched within the area of the City. The con

the level Carse, in the tract between the forth and stant references made in our pages to vanishing the Bannock-the English, most disastrously for London show how rapidly old landmarks are them, having the Bannock at their backs. If this disappearing, and we are grateful to Mr. Ditchfield ground is accepted, the movements of the Scottish for these descriptions and sketches of places, army

otherwise almost unintelligible as the some of which will in course of time become mere

tactics of a master of war-are readily explained, matters of history.

and the accounts of the different authorities may The author begins with a quest for the earliest be harmonized without violence. relics to be found of London civilization. He The story of the battle as we learnt it in our does not concern himself about Celtic London, childhood falls almost to nothing.

Edward's army but contents himself with searching for Roman of 100,000 men soon, no doubt, began to seem London, the first object looked for being doubtful; but the awful charge of the heavy-armed the Roman wall. The survey is begun at English horse, and the plunge into the treacherous the Tower, where among the remains of the “pots,". covered with earth and hurdles, and fitted Wardrobe Tower, close to the White Tower, there with wicked stakes, seemed still to survive, as did is a portion with some mediæval building attached the “multitude that watched afar” which poured to it. This was long concealed by modern brick down on the wearied English at the end of the day work, and eventually it was found that the wall and completed the rout. Dr. Morris, however, had continued further south. “From the Tower assured that the Carse was the battle-field, tells us it ran northwards across the moat, through that the “pots” were dug, indeed, but, as things Tower Hill (though no signs appear above the turned out, were never used, while the campground) to Trinity Place, where we see a large followers on Gillies' Hill must be relegated to the portion from the level of the street. It has been region of myth. repaired, and a roof has been placed over the top One of the ablest features of the work is the to preserve it." Northwards, a considerable handling of the original authorities, and the skill portion of the wall is to be found in Barber's and insight with which each is corrected as to his Bonded Warehouses, Cooper's Row. Mr. Ditch-errors, and made to yield his quota of truth. Thus field was permitted to examine this, which forms we have discrepant accounts of the position of the part of the eastern wall of the great warehouse English archers, said by the Lanercost Chronicler and vaults. “Its height here is 35 ft., and we climb and by Trokelowe to have been in the first line, stairs and descend into cellars, and inspect each and by Baker to have been in the rear. Dr. Morris part of this magnificent stretch of 112 ft. In the plausibly conjectures that the main body of them basement it is 8 ft. thick, and entirely Roman. was in fact in the rear, but that in the course of the “ That part which is displayed on the ground and battle Edward threw out a skirmishing line of upper floors is medieval, and you can see the archers - a small proportion only of the whole rampart, along which the guard walked, protected number - which drew northwards towards the by a bulwark." In Crutched Friars, No. 1 has English right, and did some rapid and not ineffec. been named Roman Wall House,” where a tive shooting into the left flank of Douglas. perfect piece of the wall was discovered which The account of the battle is preceded by a good forms the foundation of the neighbouring houses, and careful study of the evolution of tactics and the Mr. Ditchfield then traces the wall to the site of composition of armies during the previous reign, Christ's Hospital, where, during the erection of while the whole monograph points forward to the the new Post Office, a fine part of the wall was methods employed at Crecy and Poitiers. It is discovered beneath the ground... Steps have been curious, in analyzing the levies, to observe how Inade to lead to it, so as to facilitate inspection of unwarlike at one time were the northerners of this piece. The wall proceeds southwards,“ run- England, and, again, for how long a time it was ning probably through Printing Mouse Square Welshmen, not Englishmen, who could alone be towards the river."

counted on to do execution as archers.

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The illustrations are photographs giving views of offered for 2. 10s. 6d. Under the heading the tract over which the armies moved, and of the Curious' we notice a copy of Defoe's 'Colonel supposed field of the battle, and an attentive con. Jacque,' the second edition, published in the same sideration of them is well worth while for the year as the first (1723), 11. 58.; and under 'Early light it throws on the historical material at our Printing' there is an interesting little sixteenthcommand.

century, production from Rome, 24 pp., roughly Tue July number of The Burlington Magazine marginal notes in ink here and there, containing

hound in contemporary parchment, and bearing contains further • Notes on Pictures in the

a treatise on calligraphy and letter-writing, 1543, Royal Collections,' by Mr. Lionel Cust, these re 31. Freemasonry covers nearly 130 items in the lating to pictures by Pieter de Hooch. One, 'A catalogue, and not a few are worth consideraGarden Scene,' now at Windsor Castle, has only tion. We noted the Masonic print by Gillray received notice comparatively recently, owing (192 in. by 174 in.), in which Count Cagliostro is the to its seclusion in private apartments. Illus

principal figure, mentioned in Trowbridge's book trations of this and of two others are provided on that hero, 1786, 41.; and also a Recueil de The results of the continued exploration of Chansons,' dated Jerusalem 1765, and Philadelphie the soil of Persia are recorded in notes on 1773," and offered for 31. 7s.6d., which has bound early Persian pottery from the excavations at up with it a work on Female Masonry, both of Rhages, of which plates are given, and a de- them belonging to the circle, if not to the pen, of tailed description by M. Charles Vignier. Some Cagliostro. Under Old Plays' and Old Poetry interesting Limoges enamels by an unidentified

are some good first editions ; and two interesting master receive comment and illustration. The volumes with which we may conclude this notice -series of ‘Notes on Italian Medals,' by Mr. G. F.

are a copy of the first issue of the sixth edition of Hill, is continued. Attention is called to some Frederick Locker's London Lyrics,' which, it may thirteenth-century portrait-heads of St. Louis and be remembered, includes halt a score or so ot his family in the Château Vieux, St. Germain, the poems here published for the first time, 1822, plates of four of these showing work that is full of 108. 6d., and a first edition of Eothen, 1844, vitality, early in date as it is. There is a full-page 188. 6d. coloured illustration of a tapestry picture recently brought from China by Mr. Larkin of Bond Street, MESSRS. PROBSTHAIN & Co.'s Catalogue of Indian -droll and quaint in character, though perhaps some- Literature, Art, and Religion (No. 28) is certainly what slight as a work of art. Mrs. J. H. Pollen has worth an Oriental student's looking through. an article on Ancient Linen Garments,' and Mr. There are useful collections of Sanskrit and Pali Egerton Beck some interesting notes on Pre-texts and translations, as well as some examples Tatial Crosses in Heraldry and Ornament.' Four in like kind of divers Indian dialects, and a number -sketches of scenes at Tivoli by Turner are repro- of Grammars and Dictionaries. Books on the duced. with some comments on the points of Jains and Parsis, on Folk-lore, Yoga and Vedanta, interest in the neighbourhood by Mr. T. Ashby. Numismatics, and Music also include several good The frontispiece is a reproduction of a Persian items, among the last being six works by s. M. miniature of the sixteenth century from the collec. Tagore. The most important item in the list of tion of M. Léonce Rosenberg.

Journals and Trapsactions is a complete set, from Vol. I. to Vol. LXXIII., of the Journal of

the Asiatic Society of Bengal (1832–1904), for which BOOKSELLERS' CATALOGUES. - JULY.

1251. is asked. Under Art and Archæology we In his Catalogue No. 340 Mr. Francis Edwards noticed the Reports of the Archäological

Survey of

India, 1871-87, done by Major-General Cunningham 'has brought together something short of 300 works and Messrs. Beglar and Carlleyle, complete in on Alpive Climbing and Mountaineering generally: 24 vols., including a General Index, 201. There are The earliest work described is Fynes Moryson's also Fergusson's "Tree and Serpent Worship, * Itinerary,' the 1617 folio, offered here for 7. 108. second edition, 1873, 12. 128. ; Moor's Hindu Nearly a century separates this from the book next Pantheon," 1861 edition, 21. 10$. ; and Dubois's in date," "Itinera Alpina Tria, 1702-4, by Joh. Jac. Description des Castes Indiennes,' in a Ms. of Ssheuchzer, a small 4to, published in London, 1708, 1,019 pages, bound in calf, and thought to be the and to be had here for 14s. Of eighteenth-century author's original copy from which the English works, the best is Baron de Zurlauban's Tableau translation was made, 101. 104. A copy of this last de la Suisse," four folio vols., containing 430 copper: (1817) is also offered here at 18s. plate views-uplettered proofs—and published at Paris, 1780-86, 141. Among early nineteenthcentury things we noticed as worth mentioning Von Humboldt's Vues des Cordillères,' bound in

Notices to Correspondents. half-morocco, 1810, 91. ; Brockedon's Illustrations of the Passes of the Alps'-one of the 12 copies on

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately, large paper-in 2 vols., having the plates, of which - there are 109, in two states, 1828, 4l.; and Beau of old books and other objects or as to the means of

nor can we advise correspondents as to the value mont's Travels from France to Italy through the disposing of them. Lepontine Alps,' a coloured copy, 1800, 31.

CORRESPONDENTS who send letters to be for. MR. J. METCALFE-Morton of Brighton has sent warded to other contributors should put on the top us his Catalogue No. 14, which is both various and left-hand corner of their envelopes the number of entertaining. One of the best collections here is the page of ‘N. & Q.' to which their letters refer, that of works on botany, which includes a number so that the contributor may be readily identified. of useful works, and also a set of Anne Pratt,' complete in six volumes, and an unopened copy, E. L. H. T.-See ante, p. 26. Forwarded.

6

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