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me forth on the arena of discussion, seems to me to have nitted an act which tends to lower the dignity of the Shah; and a course which, out of respect to His Majesty, and out of d for the established customs of diplomacy, I cannot consent t ith reference to the case of Meerza Hashem Khan, lately nted British Vakeel* at Shiraz, I am quite ready to answer ents which your Highness can advance against the appoin when you bring them forward in the customary form on the f the Persian Government.

The Sadr Azim.

CH. A. MURRAY

(Inclosure 4.)-The Sadr Azim to Mr. Murray. lation.)

November 6, 185

AVE received your Excellency's letter of this date. You ed surprise that I had communicated to His Majesty the my royal master, the contents of your letter. I believe! equently informed you, both in writing and verbally, that cers of business, especially in affairs connected with the Department, I am charged to submit the entire questas Shah; and the practice existing in this country no s the usages prevalent in Europe. Neither is that attention is Majesty pays to the administration of his country de to his Royal dignity; nor is the obedience and submissi practise unsuitable to the position and office which I hold leed causes surprise is, that your Excellency should, in your tter, write that, by the orders of Her Majesty's Gover -erza Hashem Khan, who is in the pay of this Government. appointed Agent to the Mission at Shiraz, and that you Dect me to consent to such a strange and serious matter e knowledge of His Majesty the Shah, and to admit the he Mission to have an Agent in Shiraz, which is not

the Treaty.

t, with regard to Meerza Hashem Khan, the case is ju e stated; I again repeat it by the Shah's orders: E an should start for any place as a servant of the Mission, inclination of the Shah, by His Majesty's orders he w

arise

ed; and any disagreeable consequences which may proceeding will rest with that person who commits a by taking the initiative in a matter which is contrary to

y, Esq.

* Agent.

SADR AZIN

(Inclosure 5.

I HAVE received you

you say that I

expressed
to His Majesty the Sh
Highness will take the ti
I never said anything of
disapproval at the course
person into a discussion
ought to be carried on be
part of our respective Go
mistaken in supposing th

are different in this
In both countries the Viz
respec
received from and addre
received the Royal comm

and that of his Governme
diguity into the discussion.
1 hope your Highness will
regret to me in this insta
despatch will, in course of
cannot fail to alter the opin
Her Majesty to form of the
for Her Majesty's Governm
of threat held out in
the most trifling importanc
explained satisfactorily in
you are prepared to sacrifice
the 2 countries, which you
cement by a still closer allian

your

The next argument of yo

and unfounded. You preten you of the appointment of an Shiraz, as if it were somet Persian Government; where Highness that although, by are the only places in Persi reside, the British Mission h in Shiraz, Ispahan, and othe subjects in their affairs, and t of passing events. Although of Consuls, they have always local Governors; and it is not respect of a commercial dispute

* Commi

[graphic]

held, at which the British Agent wa claims of the British subjects interested fectly familiar to your Highness, of wh own time and mine by pretending that of this class at Shiraz is unknown to t contrary to Treaty?

I come now to the special case of M Highness has more than once insisted t Shah, and in the receipt of a salary inform your Highness that since I hav time previous, he has neither been in received a farthing of salary. It may ness has desired that the berats* for out, and that his name should be k Office as if he were still in the servic discussion with the British Mission, that he would not receive the pay nor in fact he never had any office or milit ment whatsoever.

Your Highness has stated to me th Government can be considered as havi can produce a paper of dismissal. I both among Europeans here and Per of dismissal, so far from being an univ rare occurrence; if a servant is to be seems to be that a superior officer tell and he goes away without receiving that your Highness argues that in P employment without the consent of ness will excuse me if I decline to well aware that in the army those whether they will or no, unless they c and I know also that a slave must whether he be satisfied or dissatisfied Highness argues that a Persian, not respectable family, finding himself salary is insufficient for his maintena for his strength, cannot present his re elsewhere, you leave no distinction b may, indeed, be true, either in the Highness, that if you had a pish-khi whom you gave an insufficient sal ask for an increase of pay in order t bread, it is in your power, instead * Government Bills. 10

at which the British Agent was present, to attend to the s of the British subjects interested. As these things are per familiar to your Highness, of what avail is it to waste your ime and mine by pretending that the appointment of an Agent class at Shiraz is unknown to the Persian Government and =ry to Treaty?

come now to the special case of Meerza Hashem Khan. Your ess has more than once insisted that he is in the service of the and in the receipt of a salary for service. It is my duty to your Highness that since I have been in Persia, and for some revious, he has neither been in the Royal service nor has be d a farthing of salary. It may be the case that your High as desired that the berats* for his pay should still be made ■d that his name should be kept on the books of the Wa as if he were still in the service, on purpose to keep up this on with the British Mission, although you were well aware would not receive the pay nor re-enter the service; and that he never had any office or military charge in the War Depart

hatsoever.

r Highness has stated to me that no servant of the Persist nent can be considered as having left the service unless be uce a paper of dismissal. I have made extensive inquiry. Long Europeans here and Persians, and I find these pape sal, so far from being an universal custom, are of extremely rrence; if a servant is to be dismissed, the common practic be that a superior officer tells him to go about his business goes away without receiving any paper at all. I am awar - Highness argues that in Persia a servant cannot leave h ent without the consent of the Government; your Highexcuse me if I decline to accept this proposition. I re that in the army those who are recruited must serve hey will or no, unless they can pay the redemption money ow also that a slave must serve whether he will or e be satisfied or dissatisfied with his condition: but if your argues that a Persian, not only born free, but of good e family, finding himself in an employment where h sufficient for his maintenance, or the labours are too gre ength, cannot present his resignation and seek employment you leave no distinction between him and the slave. I ed, be true, either in the Royal service, or in that of you that if you had a pish-khidmet,† or any other servant gave an insufficient salary, and that he came to you in order that he and his family might e in your power, instead of either letting the man s

ncrease of

pay

*Government Bills.

+ Upper servant.

service elsewhere or ind

and force him to work
ness might have the
1
and not right or law; a
is too humane to pern
enlightened to practise

Now the case of M
nature; he found his sal
and he applied to your
did not think fit to grant
you would not give him a
his business, and get mo
that your Highness told
Mission, you had given
dismissal, and from that
from the Government.
and also at the time of m
consider the Meerza as
ment, otherwise you would
and afterwards to myself
his service.

From all these circum
Highness in detail, it is c
Khan residing in the Mi
had been more than a year
Government, had just the s
part of the British Govern
Meerza, pish-khidmet, or ot

In obedience to the inst have given him his tezkerel Highness well knows that in house, he is as completely as if he were within the wa therefore, causes him to be i his duties, the responsibility ensue will fall on your High H.E. The Sadr Azim.

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arguments more perfect, and to elucida orders, I beg to trouble you with this las

You stated that the customs in thi matic affairs, were similar in Europe to t that in Europe also, the commands of th with obedience and submission. Such b both of us being aware of the fact, it is should involve ourselves in troublesome But as your Excellency admits this point surprised that His Majesty the Shah sho part in the discussion, because this is no rule having been adopted, nor is it an in the trouble to refer to the letters in y Persian Ministers, you will certainly per ber of these communications, expression "I have to inform you, by order of His have laid your letter before the Shah, manded me to give the following repl often happened that copies of the Shah' to me, have been enclosed in my letters, graphs have frequently been transmitted Chief of the Mission. At all events, whe in this respect are the same, or whet this country the source from which or trifling and of great importance, is the Shah-in-Shah (may our souls be his sac written by this Government tend to pr Since things existed this has always be try; and hereafter never will any chang After all, the execution of the Shah's or of all matters, depend upon the Chief foreign affairs the Foreign Minister sha

You also write that I had evinced bonds of friendship between the 2 Gove ence whatever to any former official agr stand your object. This can only be ex discuss the matter verbally with you. statement, that you regretted that the Shah's commands would alter the opi Queen of England would have formed British Government from your letters the expression of regret and surprise sh from the day that I assumed the office sent time, on every occasion 1 have cle by which I am actuated sincerely to co

ents more perfect, and to elucidate the case, by the Shah's - I beg to trouble you with this last letter in full detail.

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stated that the customs in this respect, that is, in diplo ffairs, were similar in Europe to those in force in Persia; and Europe also, the commands of the Sovereign were received edience and submission. Such being so clearly the case, ani us being aware of the fact, it is quite unnecessary that we involve ourselves in troublesome discussions on the subject your Excellency admits this point you ought not to have felt d that His Majesty the Shah should have personally taken the discussion, because this is not the first instance of this ing been adopted, nor is it an innovation. If you will take ble to refer to the letters in your office received from the Ministers, you will certainly perceive that in a great num ese communications, expressions such as these are used:to inform you, by order of His Majesty the Shah," or, your letter before the Shah, and His Majesty has cou me to give the following reply." More than this, it has pened that copies of the Shah's autograph notes addressed ve been enclosed in my letters, and even the original aute we frequently been transmitted for the information of the ne Mission. At all events, whether the customs in Europe spect are the same, or whether they are different, in ry the source from which originate all commands, both of great importance, is the person of His Majesty the ah (may our souls be his sacrifice!), and all the letter this Government tend to prove that such is the case. -s existed this has always been the practice in this coun reafter never will any change be allowed to take place. e execution of the Shah's orders only, and the discussion -rs, depend upon the Chief Minister of the State, and in

the

and

rs the Foreign Minister shares with him his duty.
write that I had evinced a desire to strengthen
endship between the 2 Governments; this had no refer
er to any former official agreement, and I do not under-
bject. This can only be explained when I see you,
natter verbally with you. But with regard to your
at you regretted that the letter I had written by the
ands would alter the opinion which Her Majesty the
gland would have formed of my friendship for the
nment from your letters to the Government;
of regret and surprise should come from me,

indeed.

because

hat I assumed the office of Sadr Azim, up to the pre

desire

very occasion I have clearly proved the strong actuated sincerely to cement the friendship between

ᏀᎡᎬᎪᎢ

the 2 countries; and it is
doubt can be entertained o
made an argument that I s
of Persia. Certainly, Her
interest in Persian affairs,
should be added to those no
will not alter her opinion of
rule observed in Persia, an
nation, and that Her Maje
friendship which she has for
she cannot wish to see this c
It is clear that the foundat
the purpose of increasing th
of this country, not with a
present exist.

With regard to your age
Tabreez and Bushire, you ha
that I never supposed you
just, and insert it in an officia
never yet recognized any offici
excepting in the places abov
consent to such appointments
ment or even letter of recom
Mission is in possession of an
the Persian Minister may see it
Mission have agents, secret a
world, some of whom are mere
again news writers; and all th
friendship felt for the British
the British Government have an
proof that they are formally entit
Ministers have never, in any wa
do so. Any agents which the M
except those already specified,
secresy that once, when in frien
name of one of those persons to
employment he denied it, and
description in his pay. With reg
Ispahan, I do not even know the
place, and up to the present time
How, then, can it be that, as you
sent at that meeting? If this i
documentary evidence to produce fr
that the truth may be known.

Commission

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