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'Tis finished! ay! the daring mission's filled!
The grasp of Death rests on the iron hand
That laid the Southern banner in its shroud,
And flung the "Stars and Stripes" o'er all the land.

MEMPHIS, 1882.

Virginia M. Fruger!

C. C. CARPENTER.

485

I

HAVE been more deeply interested in the life and character of Abraham Lincoln, and have admired him more unreservedly, than any other American, living or dead. I have read all the biographies of which I have any knowledge, and not one of them, or all of them, have given me the high estimate of his character which was indicated in the unreserved confidence and generous love with which he was regarded by all his contemporaries, and especially by those who came in personal contact with him and knew him best.

FORT DODGE, 1882.

ENGLISH SYMPATHY FOR MR. LINCOLN.

TH

HE hatred of aristocratic England of the American
Union in the time of the rebellion almost made

anti-slavery England pro-slavery. The anti-slavery society of Clarkson and Wilberforce were alarmed at the revulsion of principle, and issued an address to the people. They sent a copy of that address to President Lincoln, with the following letter:

"TO HIS EXCELLENCY ABRAHAM LINCOLN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

"SIR: It has seemed desirable to the Committee of the BRITISH AND FOREIGN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY, to issue, at the present crisis, an Address to the friends of the AntiSlavery cause, of which a copy is annexed.

"In directing your attention to it, the Committee. would take advantage of the opportunity, to assure you of their personal respect and sympathy, and of their ap preciation of the exceeding great difficulties of your position. Since your accession to office, they have watched, with deep interest, the progress of events, and especially the gradual development of a policy tending to promote Negro Emancipation. If certain measures in furtherance of that policy, and some apparently inconsistent with it, have not recommended themselves to the approval of the Committee, they have, nevertheless, recognized the majority of them with satisfaction, as con

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ducive, in the main, to the interests of the enslaved portion of the African race.

The Committee earnestly desire, that the sanguinary conflict between the two sections of the Union may speedily cease, and that with the removal of the sole cause of this strife, a way may open for a reconciliation, upon the enduring basis of a community of interests, and a mutual forgiveness of injuries.

"On behalf of the Committee,

"(Signed) THOMAS BINNS, Chairman.
"L. A. CHAMEROVZOW, Secretary,

27 New Broad Street, E.C.

London, 17th November, 1862."

MR. LINCOLN'S EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION IN ENG

LAND.

When it had been learned that Mr. Lincoln had been elected for a second term for the presidency, a large public meeting was called in Bristol, England, to congratulate him on his re-election, and the meeting was broken up by a mob. Afterwards the following address was prepared and signed by a number of prominent persons, representing the friends of the American Union. A few weeks later another public meeting was held in the same hall, and presided over officially by the Mayor of the city, to express their abhorrence of the assassina tion of our President and condolence to the nation for the loss of so great and good a man.

ADDRESS TO HIS EXCELLENCY ABRAHAM LINCOLN ON HIS RE-ELECTION TO THE PRESIDENCY OF THE

UNITED STATES.

We, the officers and members of the Committee of the Bristol Emancipation Society, in the name of a large number of our fellow-citizens, who, in meeting assembled, on several occasions, and invariably by a large majority of votes, have adopted resolutions in agreement with the tenor of this address, desire most cordially to express to your Excellency our congratulations on your re-election to the presidency of the United States, by the popular vote of your freedom-loving countrymen.

We rejoice in this result, regarding it as evincing the will and design of the American people to sustain you in the Anti-Slavery policy inaugurated under your administration by the Federal Government, a policy which, while rapidly making your country as free in fact as it has been heretofore by profession, will for the future. identify your administration with the Liberation of the Enslaved.

We believe that in issuing your Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all persons held as slaves by citizens who were in arms against the United States Government. after 1863, and your corresponding recommendation to purchase for emancipation the slaves of loyal persons in States not in rebellion; and your signing the law excluding slavery from all the lands of the United States at present under a territorial form of government, together with the anti-slavery policy marking many of your acts,

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