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On Liberty. By John Stuart Mill. London: J. W. Parker, 1859.

The Temperance Cyclopædia. Compiled by the Rev. W. Reid.

London: Tweedie.

Tweedie's Temperance Almanac for 1860. London: Tweedie.

An Argument for the Legislative Prohibition of the Liquor Traf-

fic, with Sequel [Prize Essay). By Dr. F. R. Lees. London:

Tweedie, 1857.

Reports of the United Kingdom Alliance for the Suppression of

the Traffic in all Intoxicating Liquors as Beverages. Alliance

Offices, 41 John-Dalton Street, Manchester.

VI.--THEODORE PARKER

144

Theodore Parker's Experience as a Minister. London: Whit-

field, 1859.

Additional Speeches, Addresses, and Occasional Ser-

2 vols. Boston, U.S., 1859.

Four Sermons addressed to the Progressive Friends at

the Pennsylvania Yearly Meeting, 1858. New York, 1858.

Trial for the Misdemeanour of a Speech in Faneuil Hall

against Kidnapping. Boston, U.S., 1855.

Theism, Atheism, and the Popular Theology. London:

Chapman, 1853.

Critical and Miscellaneous Writings. London: Chap-

Discourse of Matters pertaining to Religion. Third edi-

tion. Boston, U.S., 1847.

VII.-ENGLAND'S POLICY IN Tue CONGRESS

174

Fraser's Magazine for December. Last Article.

VIII.-DARWIN On the ORIGIN OF SPECIES.

. 188

On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or the

Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. By

Charles Darwin, M.A., F.R.S., F.G.S., F.L.S., &c., Author of

“Journal of Researches during H.M.S. Beagle's Voyage round

the World.” London, 1859. Post 8vo, pp. 502.

On the Tendency of Varieties to depart indefinitely from the Ori-

ginal Type. By Alfred Russel Wallace. From “Journal of

the Proceedings of the Linnæan Society,” July 1, 1858.

Essays on the Spirit of the Inductive Philosophy, the Unity of

Worlds, and the Philosophy of Creation. By the Rev. Baden

Powell, M.A., F.R.S., F.R.A.S., F.G.S., Savilian Professor of

Geometry in the University of Oxford. London, 1855. Post

8vo, pp. 503.

IX.—THE HISTORY OF THE UNREFORMED PARLIAMENT,

AND ITS LESSONS

215

The Rise and Progress of the English Constitution. By E. S.

Creasy, M.A. Fourth edition, revised and with additions.

London: Richard Bentley, 1858.

The Representative History of Great Britain and Ireland : being a

History of the House of Commons, and of the Counties, Cities,

and Boroughs of the United Kingdom, from the earliest Period.

By T. H. B. Oldfield. In 6 vols. London: Baldwin, Cradock,

and Joy, 1816.

Books OF THE QUARTER SUITABLE FOR READING-SOCIETIES -256

CONTENTS OF N. XX.-APRIL 1860.

.

I.-PLUTARCH'S LIVES: CLOUGH

259

Plutarch's Lives. The Translation called Dryden's, corrected

from the Greek and revised by A. H. Clough. 5 vols. Sampson

Low. 1859.

II.—The TestIMONY OP GEOLOGY TO THE AGE OF THE

HUMAN Race

279

An Account of some recent Researches near Cairo, undertaken

with the view of throwing light upon the Geological History of

the Alluvial Land of Egypt; instituted by Leonard Horner,

Esq., V.P.R.S. Phil. Trans. of Royal Society for 1855, p. 105,

and 1858, p. 53.

Reliquiæ Diluvianæ : Observations on the Organic Remains con-

tained in Caves, Fissures, and Diluvial Gravel. By the Rev.

W. Buckland, D.D., F.R.S. 4to. London, 1823.

Cavern Researches; or, Discoveries of Organic Remains and of

British and Roman Reliques in the Caves of Kent's Hole, Anste's

Cave, Chudleigh, and Berry Head. By the late Rev. J. Mac-

Enery. Edited from the original Manuscript by E. Vivian.

London, 1859.

Antiquités celtiques et antédiluviennes. Mémoire sur l'Industrie

primitive et les Arts à leur Origine. Par M. Boucher de Perthes.

2 vols. 8vo. Paris : Vol. I., 1847 : Vol. II., 1857.

III.—The BUDGET AND THE TREATY IN THEIR RELATION

TO POLITICAL MORALITY

313

The Chancellor of the Exchequer's Speech on the Finance of the

Year and Treaty of Commerce with France, Friday, February

10th. London: J. W. Parker.

IV.-ST. THOMAS OF CANTERBURY AND HIS BIOGRAPHERS 321

Vita S. Thomæ Cantuariensis Archiepiscopi et Martyris. Epistolæ

Sancti Thomæ Cantuariensis et aliorum. Gilberti Episcopi

Londoniensis Epistolæ. Herberti de Boscham Opera quæ ex-

tant omnia. Edidit J. A. Giles, LL.D. 8 vols. Oxford, 1845.

Joannis Sarisburiensis Opera omnia. Collegit J. A. Giles, J.C.D.

5 vols. Oxford, 1848.

The History of Latin Christianity. By Henry Hart Milman, D.D.

Vol. III. London, 1854.

The Life and Martyrdom of St. Thomas Becket, Archbishop of

Canterbury and Legate of the Holy See. By John Morris,

Canon of Northampton. London, 1859.

Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. A Biography. By James

Craigie Robertson, M. A., Canon of Canterbury. London, 1859.

V.--MADAME RÉCAMIER

347

Souvenirs et Correspondance tirés des Papiers de Madame Réca-

mier. 1859.

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VI.—The Acts OF THE APOSTLES; HOW FAR HISTORICAL? 392

Paulus, der Apostel Jesu Christi. Ein Beitrag zu einer kritischen

Geschichte des Urchristenthums. (Paul, the Apostle of Jesus

Christ. A contribution to a critical History of Primitive Christi-

anity.) Von Dr. F. C. Baur. Stuttgart, 1845.

History of the Planting and Training of the Christian Church by

the Apostles. By Dr. Augustus Neander. Translated from the

German by J. E. Ryland. London, 1856.

Das apostolische und das nach apostolische Zeitalter. (The Apos-

tolic and Post-apostolic Age.) Von Dr. G. V. Lechler. Stutt-

gart, 1857.

Commentar über den Brief Pauli an die Galater, mit besonderer

Rücksicht auf die Lehre und Geschichte des Apostels. (Com-

mentary on Paul's Epistle to the Galatians, with especial refer-

ence to the Doctrine and History of the Apostle.) Von Dr.

Karl Wieseler. Göttingen, 1859.

VII.—THE Reform Bill: ITS REAL BEARING AND ULTI-

MATE RESULTS

421

A Bill further to amend the Laws relating to the Representation

of the People in England and Wales. Ordered by the House of

Commons to be printed, March 1, 1860.

VIII.-CHRISTIANITY IN JAPAN

446

The History of Japan, giving an Account of the ancient and

present state of that Empire, &c. &c. Written in High Dutch by

Engelbertus Kämpfer, M.D., Physician to the Dutch Embassy

to the Emperor's Court; and translated from the original manu-

script, never before printed. By J. G. Scheuchzer, F.R.S., and

a Member of the College of Physicians, London. London, 1727.

Histoire et Description général du Japon. Par le Père de Charle-

voix, de la Compagnie de Jésus. Paris, 1736.

Nippon : Archiv zur Beschreibung von Japan, &c. P. F. von

Siebold. Leyden, 1832-51.

Narrative of Lord Elgin's Mission to China and Japan. By Lau-

rence Oliphant, Private Secretary to Lord Elgin. Edinburgh

and London, 1859.

IX.-Papal Rome

477

La Rome des Papes ; son Origine, ses Phases successives, ses

Mæurs intimes, son Gouvernement, son Système administratif.

Par un ancien Membre de la Constituante Romaine. Traduc-

tion de l'ouvrage italien inédit. Premier volume. Bâle :

Schweighauser. London : John Chapman, 1859.

Le Pape et le Cougrès. Paris, 1859.

X.–CEREBRAL PsychOLOGY: BAIN

. 500

The Senses and the Intellect. By Alexander Bain, A.M. Lon-

don, 1855.

The Emotions and the Will. By Alexander Bain, A.M., Exami-

ner in Logic and Moral Philosophy in the University of London.

London, 1859.

XI.-MR. BRIGHT, PAINTED BY HIMSELF

522

Mr. Bright's Speeches. Revised by himself. London: Judd and

Glass, 1859.

BOOKS OF THE QUARTER SUITABLE FOR READING-SOCIETIES 545

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THE NATIONAL REVIEW.

JANUARY 1860.

ART. I.-MR. KINGSLEY'S LITERARY EXCESSES.

Miscellanies. By the Rev. Charles Kingsley. 2 vols. J. W. Parker.

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THERE are two living English writers who, wide as the poles asunder in many points, have yet several marked characteristics in common, and whom we confess to regarding with very similar sentiments-Mr. Carlyle and Mr. Kingsley. Both are eminent; both are popular; both have exercised, and are still exercising, a very unquestionable influence over their contemporaries: unquestionable, that is, as to degree; questionable enough, unhappily, as to kind. Of both we have frequently bad occasion to speak with respect and admiration. We read them much, and recur to them often; but seldom without mixed feelings, provocation, disappointment, and regret. We constantly lay them down outraged beyond endurance by their faults, and mentally forswearing them in future; we as constantly take them up again in spite of vow and protest, drawn back into the turbid vortex by the force of their resistless fascinations. In short, we feel and act towards them as men may do towards women whom they at once delight in, admire, and condemn; who perpetually offend their purer taste and grate against their finer sensibilities, but whose noble qualities and whose meretricious charms are so strangely vivid and so marvellously blended, that they can shake themselves free from neither. For Mr. Kingsley we have long ago expressed our hearty appreciation; but there is a time to appreciate, and a time to criticise. Standing as he now does at the zenith of

No. XIX. January 1860.

B

his popularity, it is the fit time to speak of his shortcomings with that frankness which is the truest respect.

The historian of Frederick the Great and the author of Hypatia have many points of resemblance, but always with a variation. They are cast in the same mould, but fashioned of different clays and animated by different spirits. Both are terribly in earnest; but Kingsley's is the earnestness of youthful vigour and a sanguine temper, Carlyle’s is the profound cynicism of a bitter and a gloomy spirit. He is, if not the saddest, assuredly the most saddening of writers,—the very Apostle of Despair. Both seem penetrated to the very core of their nature with the sharpest sense of the wrongs and sufferings of humanity; but the one is thereby driven to preach a crusade of vengeance on their authors, the other a crusade of rescue and

a deliverance for their victims. Mr. Kingsley's earnestness as a social philosopher and reformer develops itself mainly in the direction of action and of sympathy; Mr. Carlyle's cxhales itself, for the most part, in a fierce contempt against folly and weakness, which is always unmeasured and usually unchristian. The earnestness of Carlyle, though savagely sincere, never condescends enough to detail or to knowledge to make him a practical reformer; that of Kingsley is so restless as to allow him no repose, and sends him rushing, téte baissée, at every visible evil or abuse. The one has stirred thousands to bitterest discontent with life and with the world, but scarcely erected a finger-post or supplied a motive; the other has roused numbers to buckle on their armour in a holy cause, but has often directed them astray, and has not always been careful either as to banner or to watch word.

Both are fearfully pugnacious; indeed, they are beyond comparison the two most combative writers of their age. Nature sent them into the world full of aggressive propensities; and strong principles, warm hearts, and expansive sympathies, have enlisted these propensities on the side of benevolence and virtue. Happier than many, they have been able to enlist their passions in the cause of right. But their success or good fortune in doing this has led them into the delusion common in such cases. They fancy that the cause consecrates the passion. They feel

“We have come forth upon the field of life

To war with Evil;" and once satisfied that it is evil ag unst which they are contending, they let themselves go, and give full swing to all the vehemence of their unregenerate natures. We comprehend the full charms of such a tilt. It must be delightful to array

the energies of the old Adam against the foes of the new. What unspeakable relief and joy for a Christian like Mr. Kingsley, whom God

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