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FIRST YEAR.

SEC. III. (1.) The main physical features of the Australian continent; the directions of its mountain ranges and rivers, and the geological character of the parts which are best known. (2.) The names of the different Australian colonies-their limits, chief towns, date of settlement, and peculiar circumstances.

SEC. IV. (1.) The chief articles of commerce between this country and the Australian dependencies; the value of exports and imports. (2.) The history of settlement in New Zealand; the divisions and chief provinces of the colony; its climate and natural products.

SEC. V. (1.) Tasmania-its discovery, first settlement, climate and productions, and chief towns: a small sketch-map should be given. (2.) An account of the most noted exploring expeditions in Australia. (3.) The form of government of New South Wales. Postal arrangements with Great Britain. Mode of proceeding for intending emigrants.

SECOND YEAR, 1866.

SEC. I. Draw a map of (1.) the South African colonies; (2.) Australia, with its political divisions. (N.B.-Places must not be indicated by letters or figures referring to a list of names at the side; but the names themselves must be inserted in the map.)

SEC. II. Describe in words (1.) the lake system of Canada; (2.) the physical features of Jamaica.

SEC. III. (1.) The islands of New Zealand-their discovery, settlement, and present government; with the chief articles of export and import. (2.) The history of the Mauritius; its climate, productions, and commercial importance. (3.) The progress of British settlement in Australia; the political and commercial development of these colonies; with a particular account of the growth of Victoria or Queensland.

FIRST YEAR.

SEC. IV. Ceylon; its physical features, climate, natural products, with some account of the native inhabitants; their history, and the settlements of European nations in this island at various times.

SEC. V. (1.) British India; its physical features, climate, and productions; its political divisions laid down in a small sketch-map containing the principal towns and rivers. (2.) An account of the progress of British power in India, with the various changes in the constitution of the East India Company from its incorporation to its extinction. (3.) Describe the overland route to India, the time occupied in effecting it, and the modern improvements to which it has given rise in Egypt.

SECOND YEAR, 1867.

SEC. I. (1.) Draw a map of New Zealand; (2.) British North America. Insert in it the names of such places only as you think it material for children to remember.

SEC. II. Describe in words the mountain system of India.

SEC. III. (1.) Tasmania; its discovery and subsequent history; it chief towns and government; the produce of the island; and its general condition at this time. (2.) The history of British settlement

in South Africa; the nature of the country; its inhabitants and political divisions. (3.) The West Indian Islands and British Guiana; the history of these colonies; changes in their political history; and their former and present commercial value.

SEC. IV. Draw up notes for a lesson to your pupil-teachers on the discovery of gold, and the mode of working at the gold-fields.

FIRST YEAR. SPECIAL CONTINENT-AFRICA.

SEC. III. In what respect does the north of Africa differ from what it was in the time of the Roman Empire? What is the history of colonisation in Southern Africa?

SEC. IV. (1.) The chief trade between England and (a.) Egypt; (b.) Western Africa; (c.) Southern Africa. (2.) Name all the British settlements in Africa, or in the islands belonging to it. What is the chief value of these settlements? What are the chief articles we im

port from Western Africa?

SECOND YEAR, 1868.

SEC. IV. Draw a map of the mountain and river system of India. Insert in it the names of such places only as you think it material for children to remember.

N.B.-Places must not be indicated by letter or figures referring to a list of names at the side, but the names themselves must be inserted in the map.

The map should be drawn on a scale sufficient to occupy all the blank space available. If the candidate can put in and correctly number the lines of latitude and longitude, it will add to the value of the exercise.

SEC. II. Describe in words the lake system of British America, and the course of the S. Lawrence.

SEC. III. (1.) Some account of British Columbia and Vancouver Island; its government, history, and recent productions. (2.) An account of Ceylon, its history and natural productions. (3.) What is the chief commercial value to England of her colonies in South Africa? Compare the capabilities of these colonies for a British settler with New Zealand or with Queensland.

What are

SEC. IV. What are the sugar-producing colonies? the different kinds of sugar? What is the comparative commercial value of each? What is the history of the sugar trade?

SEC. V. Draw up notes for a lesson to a pupil-teacher on the physical features of the Australian continent.

FIRST YEAR.

SEC. IV. Give a short historical notice of Canada, and state what you can of―(1.) Its mineral riches; (2.) Its forest productions; (3.) Its wild animals.

SEC. V. (1.) State what you understand by the "West Indies." Enumerate the British, French, and Dutch islands of North America, and give a short account of the Bahamas. (2.) Describe the river system of North America, and more particularly the S. Lawrence or Mississippi. Draw a map of its course. (3.) What is the trade between England and (a.) New Brunswick; (b.) Hudson Bay Territory; (c.) Vancouver Island; (d.) Newfoundland?

SECOND YEAR, 1869.

SEC. I. Draw a map of the lake system of North America. N.B.-Places must not be indicated by letters or figures referring to a list of names at the side, but the names themselves must be inserted in the map.

The map should be drawn on a scale sufficient to occupy all the blank space available. If the candidate can put in and correctly number the lines of latitude and longitude, it will add to the value of the exercise.

SEC. II. Describe in words the geological structure of the Australian continent.

SEC. III. (1.) The history and present government of Tasmania. (2.) The chief West India islands; their former and present value to this country; islands belonging to other European States.

SEC. IV. (3.) The trade of India and the sources of Indian revenue.

FIRST YEAR.

SEC. V. Give some account of these islands-the Falkland Islands, South Georgia, Juan Fernandez, Tierra del Fuego, the Galapagos, Chiloe.

SECOND YEAR, 1870.

SEC. I. Draw a map of the river and mountain system of Hindostan. Insert in it the names of such places only as you think it material for children to remember.

SEC. II. Describe in words the physical features of the country in Cape Colony.

SEC. III. (1.) The history of Canada, and the present government of that country. What is meant by "The Dominion?" (2.) An account of European settlements on the West Coast of Africa. (3.) A history of the attempts to cultivate intercourse with China, and of our settlement of Hong-Kong.

SEC. IV. Draw up notes for a lesson to a pupil-teacher on the distribution of the British Colonies.

FIRST YEAR.

SPECIAL CONTINENT-ASIA.

SEC. III. (1.) Describe the physical features of Hindostan in general outline. What are the most fertile parts of the country; and what are its chief exports to Europe? (3.) Burmah; its divisions, government, inhabitants, and exports.

SEC. IV. (1.) An account of the island of Ceylon; its history and physical features. (3.) The course of the Himalay mountains; their animal, vegetable, and mineral productions; and the tribes which inhabit them.

SEC. V. Enumerate the chief subject states in India under native princes. When was Scinde annexed to the British Empire? Describe its physical conditions, chief towns, and productions.

SECOND YEAR, 1871.

SEC. II. Describe in words the mountain system of the Australian continent.

SEC. III. An account of the European settlement of (1.) Tasmania; (2.) New South Wales; or (3.) Canada. Describe the present form of government, and the chief sources of wealth and prosperity.

SEC. IV. Draw up notes for a lesson to a first class on (1.) the physical features of Cape Colony; or (2.) the river Ganges.

FIRST YEAR. SPECIAL CONTINENT-NORTH AMERICA.

SEC. II. Describe in words the lake system which has its outlet by the River S. Lawrence.

SEC. III. The divisions of British North America, with their principal towns and rivers.

SEC. IV. British Columbia; its history, boundaries, chief divisions, and natural productions.

SEC. V. (1.) Describe the climate of Canada; its trees and animals; the inhabitants, and the chief articles of commerce. (2.) Give an account of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; their productions and articles of commerce. Describe the entrance to the Gulf of S. Lawrence, with the islands to the north and south.

SEC. VII. (1.) Give an account of the British colonies in Australia. (2.) The chief articles of commerce between England and Hindostan, with a description of the course of the Ganges. (3.) The chief West India Islands, with their productions and natural features.

SECOND YEAR, 1872.

SEC. I.-Q. I. II. III. Map of Scandinavia. Mountain system of Great Britain or the Mediterranean.

SEC. II. (1.) Describe in words the eastern coast of England from Berwick to Dover. (2.) The river system of Ireland or of Hindostan. (3.) The West India Islands which belong to the Queen; their relative position, importance, and present condition.

SEC. III. An account of the European settlement of (1.) Cape Colony; (2.) British Guiana; or (3.) Hong-Kong. Sketch the history of the settlement, and describe the present form of government, and the chief sources of wealth and prosperity.

SEC. IV. (1.) Some account of the trade in coal, corn, or wool. (2.) The places whence the most important metals are imported, and the relative value of each. (3.) The chief exports of Great Britain; the causes of recent changes in their amount and value.

SEC. V. Draw up notes for a lesson to a first class on (1.) The lake system of North America; (2.) The exploration of the interior of Australia; or (3.) The river Indus.

FIRST YEAR.

(For students leaving at the end of their first year.)

SEC. VII. (1.) Enumerate the chief colonies of Great Britain, and state how each was acquired. (2.) The countries from which we get corn, wool, gold, spices, tea, coffee, alpaca wool, sandal wood, tin, tallow, hemp, leather, silk, sugar, ivory, ebony, bristles, quicksilver. (3.) A particular description of the colony of New Zealand.

APPENDIX III.

COLONIES, &c., THAT ONCE BELONGED TO

A. In Europe.

ENGLAND.

1. Calais, taken by Edward III. 1347, re-captured in Queen Mary's reign by the Duke of Guise, 1558.

2. Dunkirk, sold by Charles II., 1658-1662.

3. Minorca (Balearic Islands), Admiral Byng failed to relieve it, 1756, for which he was shot at Spithead. Finally relinquished to Spain, 1802.

4. IONIAN ISLANDS, Corfu, Paxo, Santa Maura, Cephalonia, Ithaca, Zante, Cerigo. Under English protection from 1814 until 1864, when they were ceded to George King of Greece, the brother of our Princess of Wales.

The student will remember that a large portion of France belonged to the English kings in the times of the earlier Henrys and Edwards. B. Asia.

1. JAVA was a British possession from 1811 to 1815 under the government of Sir Stamford Raffles.

2. MANILLA in the Philippines was held for a short time, 1762–64. C. Africa.

Tangiers, part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza, Charles II.'s. Queen (1662-1683).

D. America.

The United States were originally British colonies. Declaration of independence of thirteen States, 1776. (Hence thirteen stripes in star-bespangled banner "-stars for number of States.)

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1. New Hampshire.

2. Massachusetts. 3. Rhode Island. 4. Connecticut.

5. New York.

6. New Jersey.
7. Pennsylvania.
8. Delaware.
9. Maryland.

10. Virginia.

11. North Carolina.

12. South Carolina.

13. Georgia.

The above were English colonies.

All the West Indies have been from time to time in England's hands, owing to the supremacy of her fleets.

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